Results for 'Katherine Yoshida'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. The development of perceptual grouping biases in infancy: a Japanese-English cross-linguistic study.Katherine A. Yoshida, John R. Iversen, Aniruddh D. Patel, Reiko Mazuka, Hiromi Nito, Judit Gervain & Janet F. Werker - 2010 - Cognition 115 (2):356-361.
    Perceptual grouping has traditionally been thought to be governed by innate, universal principles. However, recent work has found differences in Japanese and English speakers' non-linguistic perceptual grouping, implicating language in non-linguistic perceptual processes (Iversen, Patel, & Ohgushi, 2008). Two experiments test Japanese- and English-learning infants of 5-6 and 7-8 months of age to explore the development of grouping preferences. At 5-6 months, neither the Japanese nor the English infants revealed any systematic perceptual biases. However, by 7-8 months, the same age (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2. Exclusion Constraints Facilitate Statistical Word Learning.Katherine Yoshida, Mijke Rhemtulla & Athena Vouloumanos - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):933-947.
    The roles of linguistic, cognitive, and social-pragmatic processes in word learning are well established. If statistical mechanisms also contribute to word learning, they must interact with these processes; however, there exists little evidence for such mechanistic synergy. Adults use co-occurrence statistics to encode speech–object pairings with detailed sensitivity in stochastic learning environments (Vouloumanos, 2008). Here, we replicate this statistical work with nonspeech sounds and compare the results with the previous speech studies to examine whether exclusion constraints contribute equally to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Metaphysics of Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (5):310-321.
    Social groups, including racial and gender groups and teams and committees, seem to play an important role in our world. This article examines key metaphysical questions regarding groups. I examine answers to the question ‘Do groups exist?’ I argue that worries about puzzles of composition, motivations to accept methodological individualism, and a rejection of Racialism support a negative answer to the question. An affirmative answer is supported by arguments that groups are efficacious, indispensible to our best theories, and accepted given (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  4. How Things Persist.Katherine Hawley - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):230-233.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   123 citations  
  5. Essentializing Language and the Prospects for Ameliorative Projects.Katherine Ritchie - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):460-488.
    Some language encourages essentialist thinking. While philosophers have largely focused on generics and essentialism, I argue that nouns as a category are poised to refer to kinds and to promote representational essentializing. Our psychological propensity to essentialize when nouns are used reveals a limitation for anti-essentialist ameliorative projects. Even ameliorated nouns can continue to underpin essentialist thinking. I conclude by arguing that representational essentialism does not doom anti-essentialist ameliorative projects. Rather it reveals that would-be ameliorators ought to attend to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6.  20
    Consent Related Challenges for Neonatal Clinical Trials.Katherine F. Guttmann, Yvonne W. Wu, Sandra E. Juul & Elliott M. Weiss - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):38-40.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 38-40.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Vagueness and Existence.Katherine Hawley - 2002 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (1):125-140.
    Vague existence can seem like the worst kind of vagueness in the world, or seem to be an entirely unintelligible notion. This bad reputation is based upon the rumour that if there is vague existence then there are non-existent objects. But the rumour is false: the modest brand of vague existence entailed by certain metaphysical theories of composition does not deserve its bad reputation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  8. Science as a Guide to Metaphysics?Katherine Hawley - 2006 - Synthese 149 (3):451-470.
    Analytic metaphysics is in resurgence; there is renewed and vigorous interest in topics such as time, causation, persistence, parthood and possible worlds. We who share this interest often pay lip-service to the idea that metaphysics should be informed by modern science; some take this duty very seriously.2 But there is also a widespread suspicion that science cannot really contribute to metaphysics, and that scientific findings grossly underdetermine metaphysical claims. For some, this prompts the thought ‘so much the worse for metaphysics’; (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  9. Epistemic Authority: Preemption or Proper Basing?Katherine Dormandy - 2018 - Erkenntnis 83 (4):773-791.
    Sometimes it is epistemically beneficial to form a belief on authority. When you do, what happens to other reasons you have for that belief? Linda Zagzebski’s total-preemption view says that these reasons are “preempted”: you still have them, but you do not use them to support your belief. I argue that this situation is problematic, because having reasons for a belief while not using them forfeits you doxastic justification. I present an alternative account of belief on authority, the proper-basing view, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  10. Testimony and knowing how.Katherine Hawley - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):397-404.
    Much of what we learn from talking and listening does not qualify as testimonial knowledge: we can learn a great deal from other people without simply accepting what they say as being true. In this article, I examine the ways in which we acquire skills or knowledge how from our interactions with other people, and I discuss whether there is a useful notion of testimonial knowledge how.Keywords: Knowledge how; Practical knowledge; Tacit knowledge; Testimony; Skills; Assertion.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  11. Emerging levels of consciousness in early human development.Katherine Nelson - 2005 - In Herbert S. Terrace & Janet Metcalfe (eds.), The Missing Link in Cognition: Origins of Self-Reflective Consciousness. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 116-141.
  12. Which symmetry? Noether, Weyl, and conservation of electric charge.Katherine A. Brading - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (1):3-22.
  13.  21
    “Concept” is a useful concept in developmental research.Katherine Nelson - 2011 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (2):96-101.
    Concepts have been a focus of research in developmental psychology for more than 50 years, although the target article does not refer to these uses of the concept of “concept.” I summarize some of the developmental research that is relevant to the issues raised. Cognitive content, concepts as internal products of memory, and the relation of internal concepts to language learning are pointed out important problems in considering the usefulness of the construct in psychology. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  26
    Postpartum Maternal Tethering: A Bioethics of Early Motherhood.Katherine A. Mason - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (1):49-72.
    We must reconceive the ethical relationship between mothers and their newborn babies. The intertwinement of mother and baby does not disappear with birth but rather persists in the form of postpartum maternal tethering. Drawing upon three years of ethnographic fieldwork and training in the United States and China, I argue that dependencies associated with postpartum maternal tethering make it extremely difficult for postpartum mothers to act autonomously, even in the relational sense. Breaching this tether opens up new possibilities for thinking (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  94
    Stereotyping: The multifactorial view.Katherine Puddifoot - 2017 - Philosophical Topics 45 (1):137-156.
    This paper proposes and defends the multifactorial view of stereotyping. According to this view, multiple factors determine whether or not any act of stereotyping increases the chance of an accurate judgment being made about an individual to whom the stereotype is applied. To support this conclusion, various features of acts of stereotyping that can determine the accuracy of stereotyping judgments are identified. The argument challenges two existing views that suggest that it is relatively easy for an act of stereotyping to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  36
    The contents of racialized seeing.Katherine Tullmann - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (4):723-741.
    This paper explores the conscious visual experience of seeing race. In everyday occurrences, racialized seeing involves the capacity for a subject to simply “see” that someone she encounters belongs to a racial category. I bridge research in analytic philosophy of perception and accounts from phenomenologists and critical race theorists on the lived experience of racialized seeing. I contend that we should not trust our visual experiences of racialized seeing because they provide, at best, incomplete information on a target’s racial identity. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  14
    Essay: How Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation Can Transform Business Education.Katherine Milligan - 2019 - Humanistic Management Journal 4 (2):265-268.
    This essay describes the challenges of Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation as a field and explores how it could contribute to transforming business education. The first suggestion is to think about System Change as a much needed shift in perspective away from focusing on the lone individual hero entrepreneur. Current problems often defy the market based approach to entrepreneurship and requires collaborations across sectors and silos. Another shift is to focus more on whole person learning and bringing the lived experience (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Wittgenstein's method : ridding people of philosophical prejudices.Katherine Morris - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  26
    Neurotechnologies Cannot Seize Thoughts: A Call for Caution in Nomenclature.Katherine E. MacDuffie & Sara Goering - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):23-25.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  27
    Sartre.Katherine J. Morris - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    A novel introduction to Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist phenomenology. Draws parallels between Sartre’s work and the work of Wittgenstein Stresses continuities rather than conflict between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, and between Sartre and post-structuralist/post-modernist thinkers, thus corroborating ‘new Sartre’ readings Exhibits the influence of Gestalt psychology in Sartre’s descriptions of the life-world Forms part of the _Blackwell Great Minds_ series, which outlines the views of the great western thinkers and captures the relevance of these figures to the way we think and live (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  21.  44
    The Human Nature of the Economic Mind.Katherine Nelson - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):377-387.
    This paper provides a historical overview of cognitive psychology and computational theories in cognitive science. Critiques of the computational model are discussed. The perspective of the evolution of mind and brain provides an alternative model such as that presented by Merlin Donald in terms of the “Hybrid Mind.” This “naturalist” model is also consistent with what we know of cognitive development in childhood. It provides a better understanding of cognition in situated context than the computational alternatives and is a better (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  1
    Introduction.Katherine J. Morris - 2004 - In G. P. Baker (ed.), Wittgenstein's Method. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 22–51.
    This chapter contains section titled: Reading Wittgenstein Wittgenstein and Waismann Further Directions: History of Philosophy Envoi: AWittgensteinian Reading of Wittgenstein?
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. David Lewis on Persistence.Katherine Hawley - 2015 - In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), A companion to David Lewis. Chichester, West Sussex ;: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 237–249.
    This chapter explores the connections between David Lewis's perdurance theory and his Humean supervenience, arguing that his influential argument about temporary intrinsics is best seen in this light. It presents domestic dispute within the anti‐endurantist camp and analyzes the following questions: why does Lewis identify ordinary objects with world‐bound parts of transworld objects, but not with time‐bound parts of transtemporal objects? Given that Lewis is a counterpart theorist about modality, why isn't he a stage theorist about persistence? Humean supervenience in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24. Epistemic Structural Realism and Poincare's Philosophy of Science.Katherine Brading & Elise Crull - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):108-129.
    Recent discussions of structuralist approaches to scientific theories have stemmed primarily from Worrall's, in which he defends a position whose historical roots he attributes to Poincare. In the renewed debate inspired by Worrall, it is thus not uncommon to find Poincare's name associated with various structuralist positions. However, Poincare's structuralism is deeply entwined with both his conventionalism and his idealism, and in this paper we explore the nature of these dependencies. What comes out in the end is not only a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. Special Relativity, Multiple B-series, and the Passage of Time.Fazekas Katherine - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):215-229.
    B- theorists frequently argue that the A- theoretic views are incompatible with the Special Theory of Relativity (STR) and that this is a problem for the A- theoretic views. however, the B- theory needs to be revised in light of implications of STR. in particular, it follows from STR that some events stand in genuine temporal relations to each other while others do not. Consequently, there isn’t a single temporal order of all events. instead, there are multiple B- series. Some (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  65
    Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Psychological Science.Katherine Nelson - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (3):263-272.
    The field of psychology has emphasized quantitative laboratory research as a defining character of its role as a science, and has generally de-emphasized qualitative research and theorizing throughout its history. This article reviews some of the effects of this emphasis in two areas, intelligence testing, and learning and memory. On one side, quantitative measurement produced the widely used IQ test but shed little light on the construct of intelligence and its role in human cognition. On the other side, reductive quantification (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  6
    Nakae Tōju shingakuha zenshū.Kunizō Koyama & Kōhei Yoshida (eds.) - 2007 - Tōkyō: Kenbun Shuppan.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  85
    Why Euclid’s geometry brooked no doubt: J. H. Lambert on certainty and the existence of models.Katherine Dunlop - 2009 - Synthese 167 (1):33-65.
    J. H. Lambert proved important results of what we now think of as non-Euclidean geometries, and gave examples of surfaces satisfying their theorems. I use his philosophical views to explain why he did not think the certainty of Euclidean geometry was threatened by the development of what we regard as alternatives to it. Lambert holds that theories other than Euclid's fall prey to skeptical doubt. So despite their satisfiability, for him these theories are not equal to Euclid's in justification. Contrary (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  29.  38
    Accessibilism and the Challenge from Implicit Bias.Katherine Puddifoot - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):421-434.
    Recent research in social psychology suggests that many beliefs are formed as a result of implicit biases in favour of members of certain groups and against members of other groups. This article argues that beliefs of this sort present a counterexample to accessibilism in epistemology because the position cannot account for how the epistemic status of a belief that is the result of an implicit bias can differ from that of a counterpart belief that is the result of an unbiased (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30.  44
    Not all information in visual working memory is forgotten equally.Katherine C. Moen, Juan D. Guevara Pinto, Megan H. Papesh & Melissa R. Beck - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 74:102782.
  31. In defense of methodological solipsism: A reply to Noonan.Katherine J. Morris - 1984 - Philosophical Studies 45 (May):399-412.
    Noonan's arguments against methodological solipsism ("methodological solipsism," "philosophical studies" 4, 1981) assumes that mental states are individuated by (russellian) content; this assumption entails that narrowness and wideness are intrinsic to mental states. I propose an alternative "extrinsic" reading of methodological solipsism, According to which narrowness and wideness are modes of attribution of mental states, And thus reject the doctrine of individuation by russellian content. Noonan's arguments fail against this version of methodological solipsism.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  12
    Sartre on the Existence of Others: On `Treating Sartre Analytically'.Katherine Morris - 1998 - Sartre Studies International 4:46-62.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  71
    Sartre on the existence of others on `treating Sartre analytically'.Katherine Morris - 1998 - Sartre Studies International 4 (1):46-62.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  42
    Developing dual-representation processes.Katherine Nelson - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):693-694.
    Cross-domain representations provide the foundation for language and are not its unique product. Modularity of a limited kind is confined to early infancy in humans and is succeeded by domain-general thinking and speaking. Representational language becomes accessible to the cognitive system during the preschool years as a supplement to experientially based conceptual processing, resulting in a dual-process system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  70
    Developing past and future selves for time travel narratives.Katherine Nelson - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):327-328.
    Mental time travel requires the sense of a past and future self, which is lacking in the early years of life. Research on the development of autobiographical memory and development of self sheds light on the difference between memory in other animals and its cultural narrative basis in humans.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  18
    Four-year-old humans are different: Why?Katherine Nelson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):134-135.
    The intentionality schema is an abstraction that relates phylogenetic and ontogenetic sequences of social understanding, but it also obscures the differences between humans and other primates. In particular, it ignores human social developmental and communicative history and the important roles that language plays in human understanding of others' intentional states.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  14
    Reliability, bias, or quality: What is the issue?Katherine Nelson - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):229-229.
  38.  25
    Teaching in good faith: Towards a framework for defining the deep supports that grow and retain first-year teachers.Katherine Newburgh - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (12):1237-1251.
    ‘Good faith’ refers to the existentialist concept of living and acting in harmony with one’s innermost values. An educator who teaches in good faith will fully actualize her philosophy of t...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  47
    The philosophy of Osman Bin Bakar.Katherine Nielsen - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):81 – 95.
    This article examines the philosophy that Osman bin Bakar has published in English. Beginning with his biography and theoretical groundings, and especially the influences that Greek, Chinese, Indian, and Islamic philosophers have had on his thought, the article then turns to Bakar's philosophy of science, 'ilm al-tawhīd, how knowledge about the world should be classified, and especially evolutionary theory within Islamic philosophy. These developments in philosophical grounding provide Bakar with a platform to suggest how science can be used as a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  30
    Naming the Lyric: Literature versus Philosophy in Plato's Symposium.Katherine Elkins - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):402-417.
  41.  24
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Time.Katherine Fazekas - forthcoming - Tandf: Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Poems.Katherine Gallagher - 1988 - Feminist Review 29 (1):133-133.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  28
    Direct-to-Consumer Genomics and Research Ethics: Should a More Robust Informed Consent Process Be Included?Katherine Wasson - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):56-58.
  44.  18
    Lexical distributional cues, but not situational cues, are readily used to learn abstract locative verb-structure associations.Katherine E. Twomey, Franklin Chang & Ben Ambridge - 2016 - Cognition 153 (C):124-139.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Estimation of Water Temperature and Turbidity in Lake Shinji and Lake Nakaumi Using ASTER Data, 2000-2002.Y. Sakuno, M. Yamamoto & T. Yoshida - 2003 - Laguna 10:65-72.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The graceful, the ungraceful, and the disgraceful.Katherine J. Morris - 2010 - In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. New York: Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. Jiji gokajō.Yoshida Tōyō - 1976 - In Tatsuya Naramoto (ed.), Kinsei seidōron. Tōkyō: Iwanami Shoten.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. On the Possibility of Metaphysical Dialetheism.Katherine Valde - unknown - Australasian Journal of Logic 18 (4).
    Metaphysical dialetheism is the belief that there are contradictions in the world. I will argue that metaphysical dialetheism is, rightfully understood, the most controversial form of dialetheism, and further that it remains an open possibility. Dialetheism can come in many different forms, but all share the same belief in “dialethas”. Depending on how we understand what it means to be a contradiction, we will develop correspondingly different understandings of dialetheism. I will explore what different versions of the position might look (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  21
    Anselm on Truth and Truth-telling.Katherine Rogers - 2020 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 94:45-57.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  20
    Misfitting, Breakdowns, and the Normal in Merleau-Ponty.Katherine Ward - 2022 - Human Studies 45 (4):697-718.
    Distinguishing between normal and non-normal cases of perception and motricity is a key part of Merleau-Ponty’s methodology in Phenomenology of Perception. Many feminist philosophers and disability scholars have criticized this use of the normal/nonnormal binary and the presumptions behind it. Others have embraced his methodology and noted its consonance with contemporary feminist, disability, and philosophy of race scholarship. In this paper, I present my own interpretation of what Merleau-Ponty means by “normal”. I draw on Rosemarie Garland-Thomson’s concept of “fit” and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000