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  1.  66
    The Aftermath of Organizational Corruption: Employee Attributions and Emotional Reactions.Kathie L. Pelletier & Michelle C. Bligh - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):823-844.
    Employee attributions and emotional reactions to unethical behavior of top leaders in an organization recently involved in a highly publicized ethics scandal were examined. Participants (n = 76) from a large southern California government agency completed an ethical climate assessment. Secondary data analysis was performed on the written commentary to an open-ended question seeking employees' perceptions of the ethical climate. Employees attributed the organization's poor ethical leadership to a number of causes, including: lack of moral reasoning, breaches of trust, hypocrisy, (...)
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  2.  42
    Rebounding From Corruption: Perceptions of Ethics Program Effectiveness in a Public Sector Organization.Kathie L. Pelletier & Michelle C. Bligh - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):359-374.
    We examine the perceived importance of three organizational preconditions theorized to be critical for ethics program effectiveness. In addition, we examine the importance of ethical leadership and congruence between formal ethics codes and informal ethical norms in influencing employee perceptions. Participants from a large southern California government agency completed a survey on the perceived effectiveness of the organization’s ethics program. Results suggest that employee perceptions of organizational preconditions, ethical leadership and informal ethical norms were related to perceptions of ethics program (...)
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  3.  49
    Measuring and Differentiating Perceptions of Supervisor and Top Leader Ethics.Janet L. Kottke & Kathie L. Pelletier - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):415-428.
    We report the results of two studies that evaluated the perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In our first study, we re-analyzed data from Pelletier and Bligh (J Bus Ethics 67:359–374, 2006) and found that the Perceptions of Ethical Leadership Scale from that study could be used to differentiate perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In a second study with a different sample, we examined the relationships between (1) individual employees’ perceptions of top managers’ and immediate supervisors’ ethical (...)
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