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  1. The Unfinished Revolution:How a New Generation is Reshaping Family, Work, and Gender in America: How a New Generation is Reshaping Family, Work, and Gender in America.Kathleen Gerson - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The vast changes in family life-the rise of single, same-sex, and two-paycheck parents-have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of family values, but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to live out those values. The Unfinished Revolution makes clear recommendations for a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving (...)
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    The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family.Kathleen Gerson - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    The vast changes in family life have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of family values, but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to live out those values. The Unfinished Revolution makes clear recommendations for a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving economy, and helps women and men (...)
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  3. Gender, Parenting, and The Rise of Remote Work During the Pandemic: Implications for Domestic Inequality in the United States.Haley Stritzel, Jerry A. Jacobs, Jennifer Glass, Kathleen Gerson & Allison Dunatchik - 2021 - Gender and Society 35 (2):194-205.
    We examine how the shift to remote work altered responsibilities for domestic labor among partnered couples and single parents. The study draws on data from a nationally representative survey of 2,200 US adults, including 478 partnered parents and 151 single parents, in April 2020. The closing of schools and child care centers significantly increased demands on working parents in the United States, and in many circumstances reinforced an unequal domestic division of labor.
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    Moral Dilemmas, Moral Strategies, and the Transformation of Gender: Lessons From Two Generations of Work and Family Change.Kathleen Gerson - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (1):8-28.
    Modern societies have reconciled the dilemma between self-interest and caring for others by dividing women and men into different moral categories. Women have been expected to seek personal development by caring for others, while men care for others by sharing the rewards of their independent work achievements. Changes in work and family life have undermined this framework but have failed to offer a clear avenue for creating new resolutions. Instead, contradictory social changes have produced new moral dilemmas. Women must now (...)
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    Emerging Social Divisions Among Women: Implications for Welfare State Politics.Kathleen Gerson - 1987 - Politics and Society 15 (2):213-221.
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    Unpacking Americans’ Views of the Employment of Mothers and Fathers Using National Vignette Survey Data: SWS Presidential Address.Kathleen Gerson & Jerry A. Jacobs - 2016 - Gender and Society 30 (3):413-441.
    Drawing on findings from an original national survey experiment, we unpack Americans’ views on the employment of mothers and fathers with young children. This study provides a fuller account of contemporary attitudes than is available from surveys such as the General Social Survey. After seeing vignettes that vary the circumstances in which married mothers, single mothers, and married fathers make decisions about paid work and caregiving, the respondents’ views swing from strong support to deep skepticism about a parent’s work participation, (...)
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