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  1.  43
    Going Beyond Input Quantity: Wh‐Questions Matter for Toddlers' Language and Cognitive Development.Meredith L. Rowe, Kathryn A. Leech & Natasha Cabrera - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):162-179.
    There are clear associations between the overall quantity of input children are exposed to and their vocabulary acquisition. However, by uncovering specific features of the input that matter, we can better understand the mechanisms involved in vocabulary learning. We examine whether exposure to wh-questions, a challenging quality of the communicative input, is associated with toddlers' vocabulary and later verbal reasoning skills in a sample of low-income, African-American fathers and their 24-month-old children. Dyads were videotaped in free play sessions at home. (...)
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  2.  94
    Investigating Science Together: Inquiry-Based Training Promotes Scientific Conversations in Parent-Child Interactions.Ian L. Chandler-Campbell, Kathryn A. Leech & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  3.  13
    Embedding Scientific Explanations Into Storybooks Impacts Children’s Scientific Discourse and Learning.Kathryn A. Leech, Amanda S. Haber, Youmna Jalkh & Kathleen H. Corriveau - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  4.  13
    Missing persons: Young children's talk about absent members of their social network.Qianru Tiffany Yang, Kathryn A. Leech & Paul L. Harris - 2022 - Mind and Language 37 (5):933-954.
    Little is known about young children's ability to talk about absent members of their social network. We analyzed the speech of four children from 2 to 5 years. References to absent caregivers were relatively frequent, even when children were 2 years old. Such references were often generated spontaneously rather than being repetitions of a name produced by the child's interlocutor. Children's comments about absent family members occasionally expressed concern about contact with them but were predominantly neutral or reflective. By implication, (...)
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