35 found
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  1. Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn’t Give Up on Intrinsic Value.Katie McShane - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we can (...)
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  2. Individualist Biocentrism vs. Holism Revisited.Katie McShane - 2014 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 9 (2):130-148.
    While holist views such as ecocentrism have considerable intuitive appeal, arguing for the moral considerability of ecological wholes such as ecosystems has turned out to be a very difficult task. In the environmental ethics literature, individualist biocentrists have persuasively argued that individual organisms—but not ecological wholes—are properly regarded as having a good of their own . In this paper, I revisit those arguments and contend that they are fatally flawed. The paper proceeds in five parts. First, I consider some problems (...)
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  3. Is Biodiversity Intrinsically Valuable? (And What Might That Mean?).Katie McShane - 2017 - In Justin Garson, Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. New York: Routledge. pp. 155-167.
     
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  4. Environmental Ethics.Clare Palmer, Katie Mcshane & Ronald Sandler - 2014 - Annual Review of Environment and Resources 39:419-442.
    Environmental ethics—the study of ethical questions raised by human relations with the nonhuman environment—emerged as an important subfield of philosophy during the 1970s. It is now a flourishing area of research. This article provides a review of the secular, Western traditions in the field. It examines both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric claims about what has value, as well as divergent views about whether environmental ethics should be concerned with bringing about best consequences, respecting principles and rights, or embodying environmental virtues. The (...)
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  5.  57
    Against etiological function accounts of interests.Katie McShane - 2019 - Synthese 198 (4):3499-3517.
    The etiological account of function defines a part’s/trait’s function as whatever that part/trait does and was selected for doing. Some philosophers have tried to employ this as an account of biological interests, claiming that to benefit an organism is to promote its etiological functioning and to harm it is to inhibit such functioning. I argue that etiological functioning is not a good account of biological interests. I first describe the history of theories of biological interests, explaining the special role that (...)
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  6.  45
    Values and Harms in Loss and Damage.Katie McShane - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (2):129-142.
    This paper explores what is meant by ‘loss and damage’ within the area of climate policy focused on loss and damage. I present two possible understandings of loss and damage, one of which connects it to harm and one of which connects it to value. In both cases, I argue that the best contemporary philosophical understandings of these concepts suggest a much broader range of losses and damages than is currently being considered within the usual discussions in this area. I (...)
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  7.  96
    The Role of Awe in Environmental Ethics.Katie Mcshane - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):473-484.
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  8. Neosentimentalism and the valence of attitudes.Katie McShane - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 164 (3):747-765.
    Neosentimentalist accounts of value need an explanation of which of the sentiments they discuss are pro-attitudes, which attitudes are con-attitudes, and why. I argue that this project has long been neglected in the philosophical literature, even by those who make extensive use of the distinction between pro- and con-attitudes. Using the attitudes of awe and respect as exemplars, I argue that it is not at all clear what if anything makes these attitudes pro-attitudes. I conclude that neither our intuitive sense (...)
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  9. Anthropocentrism in Climate Ethics and Policy.Katie McShane - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):189-204.
    Most ethicists agree that at least some nonhumans have interests that are of direct moral importance. Yet with very few exceptions, both climate ethics and climate policy have operated as though only human interests should be considered in formulating and evaluating climate policy. In this paper I argue that the anthropocentrism of current climate ethics and policy cannot be justified. I first describe the ethical claims upon which my analysis rests, arguing that they are no longer controversial within contemporary ethics. (...)
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  10.  57
    Some Challenges for Narrative Accounts of Value.Katie McShane - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):45-69.
    Recently in environmental ethics some theorists have advocated narrative accounts of value, according to which the value of environmental goods is given by the role that they play in our narratives. I first sketch the basic theoretical features of a narrative accounts of value and then go on to raise some problems for such views. I claim that they require an evaluative standard in order to distinguish the valuable from the merely valued and that the project of constructing such a (...)
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  11. Ecosystem Health.Katie Mcshane - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (3):227-245.
    On most understandings of what an ecosystem is, it is a kind of thing that can be literally, not just metaphorically, healthy or unhealthy. Health is best understood as a kind of well-being; a thing’s health is a matter of retaining those structures and functions that are good for it. While it is true both that what’s good for an ecosystem depends on how we define the system and that how we define the system depends on our interests, these facts (...)
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  12.  29
    A Basis for Biocentric Equality?Katie McShane - 2024 - Environmental Ethics 46 (2):131-148.
    Biocentric egalitarianism is the view that all living things share an equal fundamental moral status qua living things. In light of the well-known problems with past philosophical attempts to argue for this position, this paper proposes a way biocentric egalitarian claims might be understood and possibly vindicated. Relying on frameworks developed in recent discussions of the “basis of equality” in human-centered ethics, the paper argues that thinking of egalitarian claims as justified by (rather than as justifying) social ideals provides the (...)
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  13. The Bearers of Value in Environmental Ethics.Katie McShane - 2013 - In Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea & Leonard Kahn (eds.), Consequentialism and environmental ethics. New York: Routledge. pp. 17-34.
    I argue that different approaches to environmental ethics can be traced to different ways of thinking about value. In particular, it can be traced to different understandings of what kinds of things are the primary bearers of value and different views about how we should respond to that value. These different ways of thinking about value are thought to have their origins in consequentialism and Kantianism, respectively. I briefly describe these theoretical differences and consider how they lead to different approaches (...)
     
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  14. Neosentimentalism and Environmental Ethics.Katie McShane - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (1):5-23.
    Neosentimentalism provides environmental ethics with a theory of value that might be particularly useful for solving many of the problems that have plagued the field since its early days. In particular, a neosentimentalist understanding of value offers us hope for making sense of (1) what intrinsic value might be and how we could know whether parts of the natural world have it; (2) the extent to which value is an essentially anthropocentric concept; and (3) how our understanding of value could (...)
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  15. Environmental ethics: An overview.Katie McShane - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  16. Intrinsic Values and Economic Valuation.Katie McShane - 2017 - In Clive L. Spash (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society. Routledge. pp. 237-245.
    The issue of intrinsic values is often a point of disagreement and sometimes confusion between ethicists and economists. Ethicists often criticise economic modes of valuation for failing to take account of intrinsic values. In response, economists have proposed a number of different types of value meant to account for intrinsic values within an economic framework. However, many ethicists have criticised these notions as inadequate substitutes for ethical understandings of intrinsic value. One reason for confusion about this issue is that there (...)
     
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  17.  7
    Comments on Moellendorf’s Mobilizing Hope.Katie McShane - 2024 - Environmental Ethics 46 (2):177-181.
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  18.  55
    Why animal welfare is not biodiversity, ecosystem services, or human welfare: Toward a more complete assessment of climate impacts.Katie Mcshane - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (1):43-64.
    KATIE McSHANE | : Taking the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as representative, I argue that animal ethics has been neglected in the assessment of climate policy. While effects on ecosystem services, biodiversity, and human welfare are all catalogued quite carefully, there is no consideration at all of the effects of climate change on the welfare of animals. This omission, I argue, should bother us, for animal welfare is not adequately captured by assessments of ecosystem (...)
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  19.  87
    Convergence, Noninstrumental Value and the Semantics of 'Love': Reply to Norton.Katie Mcshane - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):15-21.
    Bryan Norton argues that my recent critique of anthropocentrism presupposes J. Baird Callicott's philosophically problematic distinction between intrinsic and instrumental value and that the problems that it raises for anthropocentrism in general are in fact only problems for strong anthropocentrism. I argue, first, that my own view does not presuppose Callicott's distinction, nor any claims about instrumental value, and second, that the problems it raises for anthropocentrism apply to weak and strong anthropocentrism alike.
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  20.  13
    Guest Editors' Introduction to the 2022 ISEE Special Issue.Marion Hourdequin & Katie McShane - 2023 - Environmental Ethics 45 (4):315-318.
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  21. Truth and Goodness: Metaethics in Environmental Ethics.Katie McShane - 2017 - In Stephen M. Gardiner & Allen Thompson (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 139-150.
     
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  22. Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 7th ed.Louis Pojman, Paul Pojman & Katie McShane (eds.) - 2017 - Cengage.
     
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  23.  43
    Editorial: Commons Made Tragic.Katie McShane - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (3):313-315.
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  24. Environmental Ethics.Katie McShane - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
     
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  25.  24
    Editorial. Lessons Learned.Katie Mcshane - 2010 - Environmental Values 19 (4):417-418.
  26. Holism.Katie McShane - 2016 - International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
  27.  32
    John Basl, The Death of the Ethic of Life.Katie Mcshane - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):241-243.
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  28.  46
    Loving an Unfamiliar World: Dementia, Mental Illness, and Climate Change.Katie McShane - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):1.
    Abstract:If climate change is as bad as many now predict, we may be faced with the problem of how to cope with a natural world that is changing more rapidly than our ability to form emotional attachments can keep pace with. How can we love a natural world that seems so strange and unfamiliar to us? For help in answering this question, I turn to structurally similar problems that we face in our emotional attachments to other people. Using the cases (...)
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  29.  3
    Truth and Goodness.Katie McShane - 2017 - In Stephen M. Gardiner & Allen Thompson (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Although some environmental ethicists have taken up metaethical questions in their work, the relevance of metaethics to environmental ethics has been a point of controversy in the field. This chapter reviews the environmental ethics literature on metaethics, considering what legitimate interest environmental ethics might have in metaethical issues. It reviews the main positions in contemporary metaethics, as well as the claims that environmental ethicists have looked to metaethics to vindicate. Ultimately it argues that metaethics is not entirely irrelevant to environmental (...)
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  30.  28
    Editorial: To Act or Not to Act?Katie Mcshane - 2011 - Environmental Values 20 (3):297 - 298.
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  31. Rolston's Theory of Value.Katie McShane - 2007 - In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. Springer.
     
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  32.  94
    Virtue and respect for nature: Ronald Sandler's character and environment. [REVIEW]Katie Mcshane, Allen Thompson & Ronald Sandler - 2008 - Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (2):213 – 235.
    Ron Sandler's Character and Environment is a very welcome addition to the growing literature on virtue-based approaches to environmental ethics. In the book...
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  33. Book Review: Anthony O’Hear, ed., Philosophy and the Environment. [REVIEW]Katie Mcshane - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (4):489-492.
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  34.  39
    Morality’s Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. [REVIEW]Katie Mcshane - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (3):323-326.
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  35.  54
    Review of Kristin Shrader-frechette, Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy[REVIEW]Katie McShane - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (9).