16 found
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  1.  56
    Exorcising Grice’s Ghost: An Empirical Approach to Studying Intentional Communication in Animals.Simon Townsend, Sonja Koski, Richard Byrne, Katie Slocombe, Balthasar Bickel, Markus Boeckle, Ines Braga Goncalves, Judith Burkart, Tom Flower, Florence Gaunet, Hans Johann Glock, Thibaud Gruber, David Jansen, Katja Liebal, Angelika Linke, Adam Miklosi, Richard Moore, Carel van Schaik, Sabine Stoll, Alex Vail, Bridget Waller, Markus Wild, Klaus Zuberühler & Marta Manser - 2016 - Biological Reviews 3.
    Language’s intentional nature has been highlighted as a crucial feature distinguishing it from other communication systems. Specifically, language is often thought to depend on highly structured intentional action and mutual mindreading by a communicator and recipient. Whilst similar abilities in animals can shed light on the evolution of intentionality, they remain challenging to detect unambiguously. We revisit animal intentional communication and suggest that progress in identifying analogous capacities has been complicated by (i) the assumption that intentional (that is, voluntary) production (...)
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  2.  14
    Mind the Gap – Moving Beyond the Dichotomy Between Intentional Gestures and Emotional Facial and Vocal Signals of Nonhuman Primates.Katja Liebal & Linda Oña - 2018 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 19 (1-2):121-135.
    Despite the variety of theories suggesting how human language might have evolved, very few consider the potential role of emotions in such scenarios. The few existing theories jointly highlight that gaining control over the production of emotional communication was crucial for establishing and maintaining larger social groups. This in turn resulted in the development of more complex social emotions and the corresponding sophisticated socio-cognitive skills to understand others’ communicative behavior, providing the grounds for language to emerge. Importantly, these theories propose (...)
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  3.  20
    To Move or Not to Move: How Apes Adjust to the Attentional State of Others.Katja Liebal, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello & Simone Pika - 2004 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (2):199-219.
    A previous observational study suggested that when faced with a partner with its back turned, chimpanzees tend to move around to the front of a non-attending partner and then gesture — rather than gesturing once to attract attention and then again to convey a specific intent. We investigated this preference experimentally by presenting six orangutans, five gorillas, nine chimpanzees, and four bonobos with a food begging situation in which we varied the body orientation of an experimenter with respect to the (...)
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  4.  9
    When Apes Point the Finger: Three Great Ape Species Fail to Use a Conspecific’s Imperative Pointing Gesture.Sebastian Tempelmann, Juliane Kaminski & Katja Liebal - 2013 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (1):7-23.
    In contrast to apes’ seemingly sophisticated skill at producing pointing gestures referentially, the comprehension of other individual’s pointing gestures as a source of indexical information seems to be less pronounced.One reason for apes’ difficulty at comprehending pointing gestures might be that in former studies they were mainly confronted with human declarative pointing gestures, whereas apes have largely been shown to point imperatively and towards humans. In the present study bonobos, chimpanzees and orangutans were confronted with a conspecific’s imperative pointing gesture (...)
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  5.  13
    Differences in the Visual Perception of Symmetric Patterns in Orangutans and Two Human Cultural Groups: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Katja Liebal, Carla Pritsch & Thomas Jacobsen - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  6.  17
    Different Approaches to Meaning in Primate Gestural and Vocal Communication.Katja Liebal & Linda Oña - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  7.  23
    When Apes Point the Finger: Three Great Ape Species Fail to Use a Conspecifics Imperative Pointing Gesture.Sebastian Tempelmann, Juliane Kaminski & Katja Liebal - 2013 - Interaction Studies 14 (1):7-23.
    In contrast to apes' seemingly sophisticated skill at producing pointing gestures referentially, the comprehension of other individual's pointing gestures as a source of indexical information seems to be less pronounced.One reason for apes' difficulty at comprehending pointing gestures might be that in former studies they were mainly confronted with human declarative pointing gestures, whereas apes have largely been shown to point imperatively and towards humans. In the present study bonobos, chimpanzees and orangutans were confronted with a conspecific's imperative pointing gesture (...)
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  8.  1
    Cultural and Species Differences in Gazing Patterns for Marked and Decorated Objects: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Thomas Jacobsen, Carla Pritsch & Katja Liebal - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  9.  39
    The Comparative Neuroprimatology 2018 Road Map for Research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael C. Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby S. Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  10.  3
    The Comparative Neuroprimatology 2018 (CNP-2018) Road Map for Research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  11. To Move or Not to Move.Katja Liebal, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello & Simone Pika - 2004 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 5 (2):199-219.
    A previous observational study suggested that when faced with a partner with its back turned, chimpanzees tend to move around to the front of a non-attending partner and then gesture — rather than gesturing once to attract attention and then again to convey a specific intent. We investigated this preference experimentally by presenting six orangutans, five gorillas, nine chimpanzees, and four bonobos with a food begging situation in which we varied the body orientation of an experimenter with respect to the (...)
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  12.  1
    What is a Gesture? A Lesson From Comparative Gesture Research.Katja Liebal - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  13.  24
    The Hand-on Gesture in Gorillas (Gorilla Gorilla).Eva Maria Luef & Katja Liebal - 2013 - Interaction Studies 14 (1):44-61.
    The gestural repertoire of captive gorillas contains the so-called “hand-on“ (or “pat-off“) gesture in which one animals puts its flat hand on top of another's head, which often leads to cessation of the receiver's previous activity. We investigate the origins of this gesture and developmental aspects of gesture creation. We further analyze gesture form and use in relation to the age of the sender with special consideration of the reaction of the receiver to better explain the function of the hand-on. (...)
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  14.  6
    The Hand-on Gesture in Gorillas.Eva Maria Luef & Katja Liebal - 2013 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 14 (1):44-61.
    The gestural repertoire of captive gorillas contains the so-called “hand-on” gesture in which one animals puts its flat hand on top of another’s head, which often leads to cessation of the receiver’s previous activity. We investigate the origins of this gesture and developmental aspects of gesture creation. We further analyze gesture form and use in relation to the age of the sender with special consideration of the reaction of the receiver to better explain the function of the hand-on. The focus (...)
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  15. Attentional Bias to Facial Expressions of Different Emotions – A Cross-Cultural Comparison of ≠Akhoe Hai||Om and German Children and Adolescents.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Carla Pritsch, Isabell Wartenburger, Silke Telkemeyer & Katja Liebal - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  16.  1
    When Apes Point the Finger.Sebastian Tempelmann, Juliane Kaminski & Katja Liebal - 2013 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 14 (1):7-23.
    In contrast to apes’ seemingly sophisticated skill at producing pointing gestures referentially, the comprehension of other individual’s pointing gestures as a source of indexical information seems to be less pronounced.One reason for apes’ difficulty at comprehending pointing gestures might be that in former studies they were mainly confronted with human declarative pointing gestures, whereas apes have largely been shown to point imperatively and towards humans. In the present study bonobos, chimpanzees and orangutans were confronted with a conspecific’s imperative pointing gesture (...)
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