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Kavita Shah [6]Kavita R. Shah [3]
  1.  68
    “Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me …?” A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement.Matthew K. Wynia, Emily E. Anderson, Kavita Shah & Timothy D. Hotze - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):3 - 13.
    Using medical advances to enhance human athletic, aesthetic, and cognitive performance, rather than to treat disease, has been controversial. Little is known about physicians? experiences, views, and attitudes in this regard. We surveyed a national sample of physicians to determine how often they prescribe enhancements, their views on using medicine for enhancement, and whether they would be willing to prescribe a series of potential interventions that might be considered enhancements. We find that many physicians occasionally prescribe enhancements, but doctors hold (...)
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  2.  21
    Report of the AMA Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media.Rebecca Shore, Julia Halsey, Kavita Shah, Bette-Jane Crigger & Sharon P. Douglas - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (2):165-172.
    Although many physicians have been using the internet for both clinical and social purposes for years, recently concerns have been raised regarding blurred boundaries of the profession as a whole. In both the news media and medical literature, physicians have noted there are unanswered questions in these areas, and that professional self-regulation is needed. This report discusses the ethical implications of physicians’ nonclinical use of the internet, including the use of social networking sites, blogs, and other means to post content (...)
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  3.  22
    The Primacy of Autonomy, Honesty, and Disclosure—Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs' Placebo Opinions.Kavita R. Shah & Susan Dorr Goold - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):15-17.
  4. Balancing Consciences: How our Obsession with Autonomy Sacrifices our Duty to our Patients.Kavita Shah - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):233-237.
    Healthcare in the United States is most often described and experienced as an immense, convoluted industry with a sum greater than its parts. However, it is important to remember that these parts are distinct, autonomous individuals and entities with their own beliefs, customs, and viewpoints. Moral issues surface abundantly in healthcare due to its interconnectedness with human life with enhanced proximity during life’s beginning and end. Therefore, these individual beliefs are prone to clashing as seen in three key relationships: between (...)
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  5.  21
    Increasing Cesarean Rates: The Balance of Technology, Autonomy, and Beneficence.Kavita R. Shah - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):58-59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 7, Page 58-59, July 2012.
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  6.  52
    Infertility in the developing world: The combined role for feminists and disability rights proponents.Kavita Shah & Frances Batzer - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):109-125.
    Infertile women in the developing world face an additional layer of vulnerability compared to their counterparts in the developed world due to social, cultural, political, and socioeconomic factors that truly render their infertility a disability. After exploring how infertility in the developing world fits the World Health Organization’s biopsychosocial model of disability, we will argue that feminists and disability rights proponents should jointly articulate and advocate for change.
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  7.  15
    Improving Subject Recruitment By Maintaining Truly Informed Consent: A Practical Benefit of Disclosing Adverse Clinical Trial Results.Kavita R. Shah & Frances R. Batzer - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):36-37.
  8.  19
    Selecting Barrenness: The Use of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis by Congenitally Infertile Women to Select for Infertility.Kavita Shah - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):7-21.
    Congenitally infertile woman such as those with Turner syndrome or Mayer Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome have available the technologies of oocyte harvestation, cryropreservation, in-vitro fertilization, and gestational surrogacy in order to have genetically related offspring. Since congenital infertility results in a variety of experiences that impacts on nearly every aspect of a person’s life, in the future it is possible that these women might desire a congenitally infertile child through the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis so as to share this common bond. (...)
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  9.  53
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “'Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me…?'A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement”.Timothy D. Hotze, Kavita Shah, Emily E. Anderson & Matthew K. Wynia - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):W1 - W3.
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