Results for 'Kay A. Read'

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  1.  1
    Evaluation of a Behavioral Measure of Risk Taking: The Balloon Analogue Risk Task.C. W. Lejuez, Jennifer P. Read, Christopher W. Kahler, Jerry B. Richards, Susan E. Ramsey, Gregory L. Stuart, David R. Strong & Richard A. Brown - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 8 (2):75-84.
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  2.  1
    Pain, Physical Functioning and Quality of Life of Individuals Awaiting Total Joint Replacement: A Longitudinal Study.Gretl A. McHugh, Karen A. Luker, Malcolm Campbell, Peter R. Kay & Alan J. Silman - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (1):19-26.
  3.  2
    Patients Waiting for a Hip or Knee Joint Replacement: Is There Any Prioritization for Surgery?Gretl A. McHugh, Malcolm Campbell, Alan J. Silman, Peter R. Kay & Karen A. Luker - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (3):361-367.
  4.  11
    Information and Control: A Macroscopic Analysis of Perception-Action Coupling.Ja Scott Kelso & B. A. Kay - 1987 - In H. Heuer & H. F. Sanders (eds.), Perspectives on Perception and Action. Lawerence Erlbaum. pp. 3-32.
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  5.  33
    A Genealogy of Homo-Economicus: Neoliberalism and the Production of Subjectivity.Jason Read - 2009 - Foucault Studies 6:25-36.
    This article examines Michel Foucault’s critical investigation of neoliberalism in the course published as Naissance de la biopolitique: Cours au Collège de France, 1978-1979. Foucault’s lectures are interrogated along two axes. First, examining the way in which neoliberalism can be viewed as a particular production of subjectivity, as a way in which individuals are constituted as subjects of “human capital.” Secondly, Foucault’s analyses is augmented and critically examined in light of other critical work on neoliberalism by Wendy Brown, David Harvey, (...)
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  6.  66
    Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of "Perspicuous Presentation".Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
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  7.  78
    An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's Reading of Tractatus 6.54.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During this debate, (...)
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  8. A Wittgensteinian Way with Paradoxes.Rupert Read - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    A Wittgensteinian way with paradoxes tackles some of the classic philosophical paradoxes that have puzzled philosophers over the centuries and explores how they can be dissolved using the ‘therapeutic’ method of Wittgenstein, according to the ‘resolute’ reading of the latter’s work. The book shows how, by contrast, we should give more serious consideration to real, ‘lived paradoxes’, some of which can be harmful psychically, morally or politically, but others of which can be beneficial.
     
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  9.  9
    Book Review: How and How Not to Write on a “Legendary” Philosopher. [REVIEW]R. Read - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (3):369-387.
    The author argues that Fuller’s book, with the single exception of its correct reinterpretation of Kuhn as no apostle of postmodernism—such that his “fans” and “foes” alike are boxing with (or cheering on) only a shadow Kuhn—is worse than worthless. For, in a disreputable and outright propagandistic fashion, it consists in a series of serious distortions of and outright falsehoods about Kuhn and recent philosophy of science, distortions and falsehoods which may well mislead the unwary reader. Nickles’ s collection by (...)
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  10.  63
    Is ‘What is Time?’ A Good Question to Ask?Rupert Read - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (2):193-210.
    Dummett in his recent paper in Philosophy replies in the negative to the question, “Is time a continuum of instants?” But Dummett seems to think that this negative reply entails giving an alternative theoretical account; he nowhere canvasses the possibility that there is something amiss with the question. In other words, Dummett thinks that he still has to reply to the question, “What (then) is time?” I offer no answer whatsover to such ‘questions’. Rather, I ask what it could possibly (...)
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  11.  13
    A Survey of the Life of Hugh MacColl (1837-1909).Michael Astroh, Ivor Grattan-Guinness & Stephen Read - 2001 - History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (2):81-98.
    The Scottish logician Hugh MacColl is well known for his innovative contributions to modal and nonclassical logics. However, until now little biographical information has been available about his academic and cultural background, his personal and professional situation, and his position in the scientific community of the Victorian era. The present article reports on a number of recent findings.
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  12.  1
    Political Perspectives on Church Schools and Religious Education: A Discussion of the Period From Thatcher to Blair.William K. Kay - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (1):61-75.
    Making use of material written by British prime ministers, a case is presented for understanding church schools and religious education in a way distinct from that normally utilised in academic discourse. Politicians in democratic countries depend on attracting votes to assume power. They therefore integrate church schools and religious education within existing political positions. Conservative politicans see church schools as being an example of parental choice and religious education as being an aid to moral education. Labour politicians see church schools (...)
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  13.  34
    A Strengthened Ethical Version of Moore's Paradox? Lived Paradoxes of Self-Loathing in Psychosis and Neurosis.Rupert Read - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):133 - 141.
    Wittgenstein once remarked: ?nobody can truthfully say of himself that he is filth. Because if I do say it, though it can be true in a sense, this is not a truth by which I myself can be penetrated: otherwise I should either have to go mad or change myself.? This has an immediate corollary, previously unnoted: that it may be true that someone is simply filth?a rotten person through and through?and also true that they don?t believe that they are (...)
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  14.  30
    What Does "Signify" Signify?: A Response to Gillett.Rupert Read - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (4):499 – 514.
    Gillett argues that there are unexpected confluences between the tradition of Frege and Wittgenstein and that of Freud and Lacan. I counter that that the substance of the exegeses of Frege and Wittgenstein in Gillett's paper are flawed, and that these mistakes in turn tellingly point to unclarities in the Lacanian picture of language, unclarities left unresolved by Gillett. Lacan on language is simply a kind of enlarged/distorted mirror image of the Anglo-American psychosemanticists: where they emphasize information and representation, he (...)
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  15.  1
    Beyond Just Justice – Creating Space for a Future‐Care Ethic.Ruth Makoff & Rupert Read - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 40 (3):223-256.
    Distributive justice relies on metaphors about spatial distribution. Modelling cross-temporal relations on cross-spatial relations in this way obscures how earlier groups become the later ones. Procedural justice metaphors rely on metaphors of contract and thereby on impartial reasoning. Their dominance is already problematic in the case of contemporary relations, but is even more so in the case of relations across time, where the conditions for later parties are controlled and created by earlier ones. Future generations should not be thought of (...)
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  16.  6
    Opportunities and Challenges in the Use of Innovation Prizes as a Government Policy Instrument.Luciano Kay - 2012 - Minerva 50 (2):191-196.
    Inducement prizes have been long used to stimulate individuals and groups to accomplish diverse goals. Lately, governments have become more and more interested in these prizes and sought to include this kind of incentives within the set of policy tools available to promote science, technology, and innovation. To date, however, there has been little empirically-based scientific knowledge on how to design, manage, and evaluate innovation prizes. This note discusses aspects of the prize phenomenon and the opportunities and challenges related with (...)
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  17.  1
    On Philosophy's Progress: From Plato to Wittgenstein : R. Read.R. Read - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):341-367.
    I argue that the type of progress exhibited by philosophy is not that exhibited by science, but rather is akin to the kind of progress exhibited be someone becoming ‘older and wiser’. However, as actually-existing philosophy has gotten older, it has not always gotten wiser. As an illustration, I consider Rawls's conception of justification. I argue that Rawls's notion of what it is to have a philosophical justification exhibits no progress at all from Euthyphro's. In fact, drawing on a remark (...)
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  18.  4
    Politics Without Human Nature? Reconstructing a Common Humanity.Judith W. Kay - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):21 - 52.
    Political action requires a concept of humanity grounded in an explicit notion of human nature. Feminists apprehensive about poststructuralism's implications for a feminist politics need methods and discourses that allow feminist politics to proceed toward a vision of human well-being. Recent work by Chris Weedon and Erica Sherover-Marcuse highlights the need for hypotheses that can guide efforts to dismantle oppressed habits of being and help women evaluate and develop political strategies for universal solidarity.
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  19.  1
    Beyond Just Justice – Creating Space for a Future‐Care Ethic.Ruth Makoff & Rupert Read - 2016 - Philosophical Investigations 39 (4).
    Distributive justice relies on metaphors about spatial distribution. Modelling cross-temporal relations on cross-spatial relations in this way obscures how earlier groups become the later ones. Procedural justice metaphors rely on metaphors of contract and thereby on impartial reasoning. Their dominance is already problematic in the case of contemporary relations, but is even more so in the case of relations across time, where the conditions for later parties are controlled and created by earlier ones. Future generations should not be thought of (...)
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  20. The Zofingia Lectures: Supplementary Volume A.Gerald Adler, Michael Fordham & Sir Herbert Read (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    The Zofingia Club was a discussion group to which C.G. Jung belonged as a medical student: in 1897 he became Chairman, and gave five lectures. These have survived and are published here in a supplementary volume to the _Collected Works._ The lectures are of great interest to anyone concerned with Jung's early ideas, as a young medical student from a strongly Swiss Protestant background. The Lectures are: The Border Zones of Exact Science ; Some Thoughts on Psychology ; An Inaugural (...)
     
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  21. The Philosophy of Thomas Reid: A Collection of Essays.John Haldane & Stephen L. Read (eds.) - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Thomas Reid was one of the greatest philosophers of the eighteenth century and a contemporary of Kant's. This volume is part of a new wave of international interest in Reid from a new generation of scholars. The volume opens with an introduction to Reid's life and work, including biographical material previously little known. A classic essay by Reid himself - 'Of Power' - is then reproduced, in which he sets out his distinctive account of causality and agency. This is followed (...)
     
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  22. Beyond Just Justice – Creating Space for a Future‐Care Ethic.Ruth Makoff & Rupert Read - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 40 (3):223-256.
    Distributive justice relies on metaphors about spatial distribution. Modelling cross-temporal relations on cross-spatial relations in this way obscures how earlier groups become the later ones. Procedural justice metaphors rely on metaphors of contract and thereby on impartial reasoning. Their dominance is already problematic in the case of contemporary relations, but is even more so in the case of relations across time, where the conditions for later parties are controlled and created by earlier ones. Future generations should not be thought of (...)
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  23. From Experiential-Based to Relational-Based Forms of Social Organization: A Major Transition in the Evolution of Homo Sapiens.Dwight Read - 2010 - In Social Brain, Distributed Mind. pp. 199.
    The evolutionary trajectory from non-human to human forms of social organization involves change from experiential- to relational-based systems of social interaction. Social organization derived from biologically and experientially grounded social interaction reached a hiatus with the great apes due to an expansion of individualization of behaviour. The hiatus ended with the introduction of relational-based social interaction, culminating in social organization based on cultural kinship. This evolutionary trajectory links biological origins to cultural outcomes and makes evident the centrality of distributed forms (...)
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  24.  43
    Relevant Logic: A Philosophical Examination of Inference.Stephen Read - 1988 - Blackwell.
  25.  35
    A No-Theory?: Against Hutto on Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):73–81.
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  26.  22
    "Nothing is Shown": A 'Resolute' Response to Mounce, Emiliani, Koethe and Vilhauer.Rupert Read & Rob Deans - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):239–268.
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  27.  30
    `Exists' is a Predicate.Stephen Read - 1980 - Mind 89 (355):412-417.
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  28.  17
    A Posthumous Chapter by J. S. Mill.Carveth Read - 1908 - Mind 17 (65):74-78.
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  29.  3
    Empirical Theology: A Natural Development?William K. Kay - 2003 - Heythrop Journal 44 (2):167–181.
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  30.  5
    The Number of Terms in a Syllogism.Carveth Read - 1879 - Mind 4 (13):116-119.
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  31. Misreadings, Clarifications and Reminders: A Reply to Hutchinson and Read.Daniel D. Hutto - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):561 – 567.
    This is a reply to Hutchinson, P. and Read, R. “An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus: Critique of Daniel D. Hutto’s and Marie McGinn’s Reading of Tractatus 6.54″. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14(1) 2006: 1-29. A further reply from Hutchinson, P.”Unsinnig: A Reply to Hutto” is also forthcoming.
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  32.  24
    Can Hume Be Read as a Virtue Ethicist?Christine Swanton - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):91-113.
    It is not unusual now for Hume to be read as part of a virtue ethical tradition. However there are a number of obstacles in the way of such a reading: subjectivist, irrationalist, hedonistic, and consequentialist interpretations of Hume. In this paper I support a virtue ethical reading by arguing against all these interpretations. In the course of these arguments I show how Hume should be understood as part of a virtue ethical tradition which is sentimentalist in a response-dependent (...)
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  33.  38
    A Shaggy Soul Story: How Not to Read the Wax Tablet Model in Plato's Theaetetus.Raphael Woolf - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):573–604.
    This paper sets out to re-examine the famous Wax Tablet model in Plato's Theaetetus, in particular the section of it which appeals to the quality of individual souls' wax as an explanation of why some are more liable to make mistakes than others (194c-195a). This section has often been regarded as an ornamental flourish or a humorous appendage to the model's main explanatory business. Yet in their own appropriations both Aristotle and Locke treat the notion of variable wax quality as (...)
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  34.  5
    How to Read a Graveyard: Journeys in the Company of the Dead [Book Review].Marie T. Farrell - 2013 - Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):503.
    Farrell, Marie T Review(s) of: How to read a graveyard: Journeys in the company of the dead, by Peter Stanford (London: Bloomsbury, 2013), pp.263, $32.95.
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  35.  4
    Do Volunteers in Schools Help Children Learn to Read? A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials.Carole J. Torgerson, Sarah E. King & Amanda J. Sowden - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (4):433-444.
    The aim of unpaid volunteer classroom assistants is to give extra support to children learning to read. The impact of using volunteers to improve children's acquisition of reading skills is unknown. To assess whether volunteers are effective in improving children's reading, we undertook a systematic review of all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). An exhaustive search of all the main electronic databases was carried out (i.e. BEI, PsycInfo, ASSIA, PAIS, SSCI, ERIC, SPECTR, SIGLE). We identified eight experimental studies, of (...)
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  36. Schooling Bodies to Read and Write: A Technosomatic Perspective.Joris Vlieghe - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (4):441-455.
    In this article Joris Vlieghe defends the view that technologies of reading and writing are more than merely instruments that support education, arguing that these technologies themselves decide what education is all about and that they form subjectivity in substantial ways. Expanding on insights taken from media theory, Vlieghe uses the work of Bernard Stiegler in order to develop a “technosomatic” account of literacy initiation, that is, a perspective that zooms in on the physical dimensions of how to operate writing (...)
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  37. A Shaggy Soul Story: How Not to Read the Wax Tablet Model in Plato’s Theaetetus.Raphael Woolf - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):573-604.
    This paper sets out to re-examine the famous Wax Tablet model in Plato’s Theaetetus, in particular the section of it which appeals to the quality of individual souls’ wax as an explanation of why some are more liable to make mistakes than others. This section has often been regarded as an ornamental flourish or a humorous appendage to the model’s main explanatory business. Yet in their own appropriations both Aristotle and Locke treat the notion of variable wax quality as an (...)
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  38.  18
    Do Apes Read Minds?: Toward a New Folk Psychology.Kristin Andrews - 2012 - MIT Press.
    Andrews argues for a pluralistic folk psychology that employs different kinds of practices and different kinds of cognitive tools (including personality trait attribution, stereotype activation, inductive reasoning about past behavior, and ...
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  39. In 2009, the Pew Center Produced a Report Entitled,“Public Praises Science; Scientists Fault Public, Media: Scientific Achievements Less Prominent Than a Decade Ago,” That Compares Public Perceptions of Scientific Culture (Science and Scientists) to Scientists Evaluations of Their Own Professional Culture in the United States. Part A. Read and Comment on the Overview of the Report (Http://People-Press. Org/Report/528/) By. [REVIEW]B. Part - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14:279-290.
     
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  40.  4
    Review of "Collected Papers of Martin Kay: A Half-Century of Computational Linguistics". [REVIEW]Seán Ó Nualláin - 2015 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 11 (1):373-377.
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  41.  89
    How to Read Your Own Mind: A Cognitive Theory of Self-Consciousness.Shaun Nichols & Stephen Stich - unknown
    The topic of self-awareness has an impressive philosophical pedigree, and sustained discussion of the topic goes back at least to Descartes. More recently, selfawareness has become a lively issue in the cognitive sciences, thanks largely to the emerging body of work on “mindreading”, the process of attributing mental states to people (and other organisms). During the last 15 years, the processes underlying mindreading have been a major focus of attention in cognitive and developmental psychology. Most of this work has been (...)
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  42.  26
    Towards a Universal Neurobiological Architecture for Learning to Read.Marcin Szwed, Fabien Vinckier, Laurent Cohen, Stanislas Dehaene & Ram Frost - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):308.
    Letter-position tolerance varies across languages. This observation suggests that the neural code for letter strings may also be subtly different. Although language-specific models remain useful, we should endeavor to develop a universal model of reading acquisition which incorporates crucial neurobiological constraints. Such a model, through a progressive internalization of phonological and lexical regularities, could perhaps converge onto the language-specific properties outlined by Frost.
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  43. Review of Kristin Andrews' Do Apes Read Minds? Toward a New Folk Psychology[REVIEW]Neil Van Leeuwen - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 4.
    Kristin Andrews proposes a new framework for thinking about folk psychology, which she calls Pluralistic Folk Psychology. Her approach emphasizes kinds of psychological prediction and explanation that don't rest on propositional attitude attribution. Here I review some elements of her theory and find that, although the approach is very promising, there's still work to be done before we can conclude that the manners of prediction and explanation she identifies don't involve implicit propositional attitude attribution.
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  44.  54
    How Do We Read a Dictionary (as Machines and as Humans)? Kinds of Information in Dictionaries Constructed and Reconstructed.Vincent C. Müller - 2000 - In Evangelos Dermatas (ed.), Proceedings of COMLEX2000: Computational lexicography. Patras University Press. pp. 141-144.
    Two large lexicological projects for the Center for the Greek Language, Thessaloniki, were to be published in print and on the WWW, which meant that two conversions were needed: a near-database file had to be converted to fully formatted file for printing and a fully formatted file had to be converted to a database for WWW access. As it turned out, both conversions could make use of existing clues that indicated the kinds of information contained in each particular piece of (...)
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  45.  4
    Liberal Education and the Teleological Question; or Why Should a Dentist Read Chaucer?Kenneth B. Mcintyre - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):341-363.
    This essay consists of an examination of the work of three thinkers who conceive of liberal education primarily in teleological terms, and, implicitly if not explicitly, attempt to offer some answer to the question: what does it mean to be fully human? John Henry Newman, T. S. Eliot, and Josef Pieper developed their understanding of liberal education from their own intellectual and religious experience, which was informed by a specifically Christian conception of the place of education in a fully developed (...)
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  46.  2
    How We Read Kant: An Empiricist and a Transcendental Reading of Kant’s Theory of Experience.Maja Soboleva - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-14.
    The issue of the nature of cognitive experience has been a subject of lively debate in recent works on epistemology, and the philosophy of mind. During this debate, the relevance of Kant to contemporary theories of cognition has been re-discovered. However, participants in this debate disagree whether Kant was a conceptualist or a non-conceptualist, with regard to the character of intuitions. The central point of controversy concerns whether or not Kant’s sensible intuitions involve understanding and have a conceptual content. In (...)
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  47.  39
    Towards a Philosophy of Chemistry. A Short Extract of This Paper Was First Read at the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Florence, August 19–25, 1995. [REVIEW]Joachim Schummer - 1997 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 28 (2):307-336.
    The paper shows epistemological, methodological and ontological peculiarities of chemistry taken as a classificatory science of materials using experimental methods. Without succumbing to standard interpretations of physical science, chemical methods of experimental investigation, classification, reference, theorizing, prediction and production of new entities are developed one by one as first steps towards a philosophy of chemistry. Chemistry challenges traditional concepts of empirical object, empirical predicate, reference frame and theory, but also the distinction commonly drawn between natural science and technology. Due to (...)
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  48.  37
    How to Read a Book.Allan P. Farrell - 1940 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):310-311.
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  49.  32
    Nominalism and Realism. How Not to Read the Tractatus' Conception of a Name.Daniele Mezzadri - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):208-227.
    This paper focuses on a central aspect of the “picture theory” in the Tractatus – the “identity requirement” – namely the idea that a proposition represents elements in reality as combined in the same way as its elements are combined. After introducing the Tractatus' views on the nature of the proposition, I engage with a “nominalist” interpretation, according to which the Tractatus holds that relations are not named in propositions. I claim that the nominalist account can only be maintained by (...)
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  50.  35
    Offline Improvement in Learning to Read a Novel Orthography Depends on Direct Letter Instruction.Tali Bitan & James R. Booth - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):896-918.
    Improvement in performance after the end of the training session, termed “Offline improvement,” has been shown in procedural learning tasks. We examined whether Offline improvement in learning a novel orthography depends on the type of reading instruction. Forty-eight adults received multisession training in reading nonsense words, written in an artificial script. Participants were trained in one of three conditions: alphabetical words preceded by direct letter instruction (Letter-Alph); alphabetical words with whole-word instruction (Word-Alph); and nonalphabetical (arbitrary) words with whole-word instruction (Word-Arb). (...)
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