Results for 'Kay Inckle'

697 found
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  1. Book Review: Sexual (Dis)Orientation: Gender, Sex, Desire and Self-Fashioning. [REVIEW]Kay Inckle - 2007 - Feminist Review 86 (1):193-194.
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  2. Debilitating Times: Compulsory Ablebodiedness and White Privilege in Theory and Practice.Kay Inckle - 2015 - Feminist Review 111 (1):42-58.
    In this paper I take up a critical position in regard to the theme of debility around which this collection is framed. I argue that theorisations of ‘debility’ do little to progress theory and policy in regard to disability and share many of the problems inherent to the social model. I also suggest that the theorisation of debility is rooted in and reinforces ablebodied privilege. I begin with a critical analysis of the social model of disability and explore the dualisms (...)
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  3.  7
    Taking Darwin Seriously: A Naturalistic Approach to Philosophy. [REVIEW]Charles D. Kay - 1987 - The Personalist Forum 3 (1):73-75.
  4. Social Cognitive Theory of Gender Development and Differentiation.Kay Bussey & Albert Bandura - 1999 - Psychological Review 106 (4):676-713.
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  5. Basic Color Terms: Their Universality and Evolution.Brent Berlin & Paul Kay - 1999 - Center for the Study of Language and Information.
    The work reported in this monograph was begun in the winter of 1967 in a graduate seminar at Berkeley. Many of the basic data were gathered by members of the seminar and the theoretical framework presented here was initially developed in the context of the seminar discussions. Much has been discovered since1969, the date of original publication, regarding the psychophysical and neurophysical determinants of universal, cross-linguistic constraints on the shape of basic color lexicons, and something, albeit less, can now also (...)
     
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  6. The Epistemic Features of Group Belief.Kay Mathiesen - 2006 - Episteme 2 (3):161-175.
    Recently, there has been a debate focusing on the question of whether groups can literally have beliefs. For the purposes of epistemology, however, the key question is whether groups can have knowledge. More specifi cally, the question is whether “group views” can have the key epistemic features of belief, viz., aiming at truth and being epistemically rational. I argue that, while groups may not have beliefs in the full sense of the word, group views can have these key epistemic features (...)
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  7.  5
    Book Review: Inckle K, Flesh Wounds? New Ways of Understanding Self Injury, PCCS Books: Ross-On-Wye, 2010, 244 Pp.: 9781906254292 GBP18.00. [REVIEW]A. Simpson - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (2):277-277.
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  8. Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility.Dana Kay Nelkin - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Nelkin presents a simple and natural account of freedom and moral responsibility which responds to the great variety of challenges to the idea that we are free and responsible, before ultimately reaffirming our conception of ourselves as agents. Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility begins with a defense of the rational abilities view, according to which one is responsible for an action if and only if one acts with the ability to recognize and act for good reasons. The view is (...)
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  9. Human Rights and Narrated Lives: The Ethics of Recognition.Kay Schaffer - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Personal narratives have become one of the most potent vehicles for advancing human rights claims across the world. Human Rights and Narrated Lives explores what happens when autobiographical narratives are produced, received, and circulated in the field of human rights. It asks how personal narratives emerge in local settings how international rights discourse enables and constrains individual and collective subjectivities in narration how personal narratives circulate and take on new meanings in new contexts and how and under what conditions they (...)
     
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  10.  47
    Does Physiotherapy Management of Low Back Pain Change as a Result of an Evidence‐Based Educational Programme?Kay Stevenson, Martyn Lewis & Elaine Hay - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):365-375.
    RATIONALE: The concept of evidence-based medicine is important in providing efficient health care. The process uses research findings as the basis for clinical decision making. Evidence-based practice helps optimize current health care and enables the practitioners to be suitably accountable for the interventions they provide. Little work has been undertaken to examine how allied health professionals change their clinical practice in light of the latest evidence. The use of opinion leaders to disseminate new evidence around the management of low back (...)
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  11.  99
    Even.Paul Kay - 1990 - Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (1):59 - 111.
  12.  16
    Viewers Base Estimates of Face Matching Accuracy on Their Own Familiarity: Explaining the Photo-ID Paradox.Kay L. Ritchie, Finlay G. Smith, Rob Jenkins, Markus Bindemann, David White & A. Mike Burton - 2015 - Cognition 141:161-169.
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  13.  66
    The Neurology of Narrative.Kay Young & Jeffrey L. Saver - 2001 - Substance 30 (1/2):72.
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  14. Conceptual Models and Analytical Tools: The Biology of Physicist Max Delbrück. [REVIEW]Lily E. Kay - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (2):207 - 246.
  15.  63
    Language, Thought and Color: Recent Developments.P. Kay & T. Regier - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):51-54.
  16.  11
    Putting Gender Into Context: An Interactive Model of Gender-Related Behavior.Kay Deaux & Brenda Major - 1987 - Psychological Review 94 (3):369-389.
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  17.  26
    Do Physiotherapists' Attitudes Towards Evidence‐Based Practice Change as a Result of an Evidence‐Based Educational Programme?Kay Stevenson, Martyn Lewis & Elaine Hay - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):207-217.
  18.  98
    Truth in Virtue of Meaning.Gillian Kay Russell - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    The analytic/synthetic distinction looks simple. It is a distinction between two different kinds of sentence. Synthetic sentences are true in part because of the way the world is, and in part because of what they mean. Analytic sentences - like all bachelors are unmarried and triangles have three sides - are different. They are true in virtue of meaning, so no matter what the world is like, as long as the sentence means what it does, it will be true. -/- (...)
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  19. Difficulty and Degrees of Moral Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness.Dana Kay Nelkin - 2016 - Noûs 50 (2):356-378.
    In everyday life, we assume that there are degrees of blameworthiness and praiseworthiness. Yet the debate about the nature of moral responsibility often focuses on the “yes or no” question of whether indeterminism is required for moral responsibility, while questions about what accounts for more or less blameworthiness or praiseworthiness are underexplored. In this paper, I defend the idea that degrees of blameworthiness and praiseworthiness can depend in part on degrees of difficulty and degrees of sacrifice required for performing the (...)
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  20.  30
    Color Naming Universals: The Case of Berinmo.Paul Kay & Terry Regier - 2007 - Cognition 102 (2):289-298.
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  21. The Process of Informed Consent for Urgent Abdominal Surgery.R. Kay - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):157-161.
    Objectives—To assess perceptions of the informed consent process in patients undergoing urgent abdominal surgery.Design—A prospective observational study was carried out using structured questionnaire-based interviews. Patients who had undergone urgent abdominal surgery were interviewed in the postoperative period to ascertain their perceptions of the informed consent process. Replies were compared to responses obtained from a control group undergoing elective surgery, to identify factors common to the surgical process and those specific to urgent surgery. Patients' perceptions of received information were also compared (...)
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  22. Language, Thought, and Color: Whorf Was Half Right.Terry Regier & Paul Kay - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (10):439-446.
  23.  12
    What Makes a Face Photo a ‘Good Likeness’?Kay L. Ritchie, Robin S. S. Kramer & A. Mike Burton - 2018 - Cognition 170:1-8.
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  24.  24
    [Book Review] the Meaning of Illness, a Phenomenological Account of the Different Perspectives of Physician and Patient. [REVIEW]S. Kay Toombs - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):41-42.
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  25.  41
    Science [Ne] Imperialism: There Are Nontrivial Constraints on Color Naming.Paul Kay & Brent Berlin - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):196-201.
    Saunders & van Brakel's claim that Berlin and Kay (1969) assumed a language/vision correlation in the area of color categorization and disguised this assumption as a finding is shown to be false. The methodology of the World Color Survey, now nearing completion, is discussed and the possibility of an additional language/vision correlation in color categorization is suggested.
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  26.  18
    Can Groups Be Epistemic Agents?Kay Mathiesen - 2011 - In Hans Bernhard Schmid, Daniel Sirtes & Marcel Weber (eds.), Collective Epistemology. Ontos. pp. 20--23.
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  27.  54
    Questioning the Social Intelligence Hypothesis.Kay E. Holekamp - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):65-69.
  28.  22
    What is Information Ethics?Kay Mathiesen - 2004 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 34 (1):6.
  29.  19
    Three Cheers for Double Effect.Samuel C. Rickless Dana Kay Nelkin - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):125-158.
    The doctrine of double effect, together with other moral principles that appeal to the intentions of moral agents, has come under attack from many directions in recent years, as have a variety of rationales that have been given in favor of it. In this paper, our aim is to develop, defend, and provide a new theoretical rationale for a secular version of the doctrine. Following Quinn , we distinguish between Harmful Direct Agency and Harmful Indirect Agency. We propose the following (...)
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  30.  58
    Human Rights for the Digital Age.Kay Mathiesen - 2014 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (1):2-18.
    Human rights are those legal and/or moral rights that all persons have simply as persons. In the current digital age, human rights are increasingly being either fulfilled or violated in the online environment. In this article, I provide a way of conceptualizing the relationships between human rights and information technology. I do so by pointing out a number of misunderstandings of human rights evident in Vinton Cerf's recent argument that there is no human right to the Internet. I claim that (...)
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  31.  96
    Introduction to Special Issue of Social Epistemology on "Collective Knowledge and Collective Knowers".Kay Mathiesen - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):209 – 216.
  32.  7
    Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist.Charles D. Kay - 1994 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):127-130.
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  33.  18
    Phosphatidylinositol 3‐Phosphate, a Lipid That Regulates Membrane Dynamics, Protein Sorting and Cell Signalling.Kay O. Schink, Camilla Raiborg & Harald Stenmark - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (10):900-912.
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  34.  7
    Implementing a Shared Decision‐Making and Cognitive Strategy‐Based Intervention: Knowledge User Perspectives and Recommendations.Kay‐Ann M. Allen, Katherine R. Dittmann, Jennifer A. Hutter, Catherine Chuang, Michelle L. Donald, Amie L. Enns, Nina Hovanec, Anne W. Hunt, Richard S. Kellowan, Elizabeth A. Linkewich, Alexandra S. Patel, Anisha Rehmtulla & Sara E. McEwen - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (2):575-581.
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  35. Collective Consciousness.Kay Mathieson - 2005 - In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Clarendon Press. pp. 235-252.
    In this essay, I explore this idea of a collective consciousness. I propose that individuals can share in a collective consciousness by forming a collective subject. I begin the essay by considering and rejecting three possible pictures of collective subjectivity: the group mind, the emergent mind, and the socially embedded mind. I argue that each of these accounts fails to provide one of the following requirements for collective subjectivity: (1) plurality, (2) awareness, and (3) collectivity. I then look to Edmund (...)
     
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  36.  42
    Who Wrote the Book of Life? Information and the Transformation of Molecular Biology, 1945–55.Lily E. Kay - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (4):609-634.
    The ArgumentThis paper focuses on the opening of a discursive space: the emergence of informational and scriptural representations of life and their self-negating consequences for the construction of biological meaning. It probes the notion of writing and the book of life and shows how molecular biology's claims to a status of language and texuality undermines its own objective of control. These textual significations were historically contingent. The informational representations of heredity and life were not an outcome of the internal cognitive (...)
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  37.  18
    Selling Pure Science in Wartime: The Biochemical Genetics of G. W. Beadle.LilyE Kay - 1989 - Journal of the History of Biology 22 (1):73 - 101.
  38. The Molecular Vision of Life: Caltech, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Rise of the New Biology.Lily E. Kay - 1996 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In this fascinating study, the author analyzes the conceptual roots of molecular biology and the social matrix in which it was developed.
     
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  39.  19
    From Logical Neurons to Poetic Embodiments of Mind: Warren S. McCulloch’s Project in Neuroscience.Lily E. Kay - 2001 - Science in Context 14 (4).
  40. The Lived Experience of Disability.S. Kay Toombs - 1995 - Human Studies 18 (1):9-23.
    In this paper I reflect upon my personal experience of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis in order to provide a phenomenological account of the human experience of disability. In particular, I argue that the phenomenological notion of lived body provides important insights into the profound disruptions of space and time that are an integral element of changed physical capacities such as loss of mobility. In addition, phenomenology discloses the emotional dimension of physical disorder. The lived body disruption engendered by loss of (...)
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  41. Zizek: A Critical Introduction.Sarah Kay - 2003 - Distributed in the Usa by Blackwell.
    Introduction: Thinking, writing, and reading about the real -- Dialectic and the real : Lacan, Hegel, and the alchemy of après-coup -- 'Reality' and the real : culture as anamorphosis -- The real of sexual difference : imagining, thinking, being -- Ethics and the real : the ungodly virtues of psychoanalysis -- Politics, or, the art of the impossible.
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  42.  8
    Hegel on Sleep and Walking.Antón Barba-Kay - 2018 - Hegel-Jahrbuch 11 (1):290-294.
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  43. The Meaning of Illness: A Phenomenological Approach to the Patient-Physician Relationship.S. Kay Toombs - 1987 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):219-240.
    This essay argues that philosophical phenomenology can provide important insights into the patient-physician relationship. In particular, it is noted that the physician and patient encounter the experience of illness from within the context of different "worlds", each "world" providing a horizon of meaning. Such phenomenological notions as focusing, habits of mind, finite provinces of meaning, and relevance are shown to be central to the way these "worlds" are constituted. An eidetic interpretation of illness is proposed. Such an interpretation discloses certain (...)
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  44. Deeper Than Deep Ecology: The Eco-Feminist Connection.Ariel Kay Salleh - 1984 - Environmental Ethics 6 (4):339-345.
    I offer a feminist critique of deep ecology as presented in the seminal papers of Naess and Devall. I outline the fundamental premises involved and analyze their internal coherence. Not only are there problems on logical grounds, but the tacit methodological approach of the two papers are inconsistent with the deep ecologists’ own substantive comments. I discuss these shortcomings in terms of a broader feminist critique of patriarchal culture and point out some practical and theoretical contributions which eco-feminism can make (...)
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  45.  56
    The Internet, Children, and Privacy: The Case Against Parental Monitoring.Kay Mathiesen - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (4):263-274.
    It has been recommended that parents should monitor their children’s Internet use, including what sites their children visit, what messages they receive, and what they post. In this paper, I claim that parents ought not to follow this advice, because to do so would violate children’s right to privacy over their on-line information exchanges. In defense of this claim, I argue that children have a right to privacy from their parents, because such a right respects their current capacities and fosters (...)
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  46.  73
    We 'Re All in This Together: Responsibility of Collective Agents and Their Members'.Kay Mathiesen - 2006 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):240–255.
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  47. Moral Responsibility for Unwitting Omissions: A New Tracing View.Dana Kay Nelkin & Samuel C. Rickless - 2017 - In The Ethics and Law of Omissions. New York, NY, USA: pp. 106-129.
    Unwitting omissions pose a challenge for theories of moral responsibility. For commonsense morality holds many unwitting omitters morally responsible for their omissions (and for the consequences thereof), even though they appear to lack both awareness and control. For example, some people who leave dogs trapped in their cars outside on a hot day (see Sher 2009), or who forget to pick something up from the store as they promised (see Clarke 2014) seem to be blameworthy for their omissions. And yet, (...)
     
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  48.  2
    Suffering Existence: Nonhuman Animals and Ethics.Kay Peggs & Barry Smart - 2018 - In Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan Uk. pp. 419-443.
    This chapter explores critically ethical concerns arising from forms of suffering to which domesticated nonhuman animals are subjected in scientific instruction and research and within the industrial-factory-farm-food complex, as well as other contexts. Consideration is given to the views of Arthur Schopenhauer on suffering, René Descartes’s designation of ontological differences between human and non-human animals, and Donna Haraway’s reconfiguration of the relationship between human and nonhuman animals in scientific laboratory settings. Proceeding from a discussion of David Benatar’s “antinatalist” views the (...)
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  49.  85
    Automaticity in Social-Cognitive Processes.John A. Bargh, Kay L. Schwader, Sarah E. Hailey, Rebecca L. Dyer & Erica J. Boothby - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (12):593-605.
  50.  8
    Making Different Differences: Representation and Rights in Sexuality Activism.Kay Lalor - 2015 - Feminist Legal Studies 23 (1):7-25.
    This paper argues that current iterations of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights are limited by an overreliance on particular representations of sexuality, in which homosexuality is defined negatively through a binary of homosexual/heterosexual. The limits of these representations are explored in order to unpick the possibility of engaging in a form of sexuality politics that is grounded in difference rather than in sameness or opposition. The paper seeks to respond to Braidotti’s call for an “affirmative politics” that is (...)
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