29 found
Order:
  1.  32
    Philosophy and Revolutions in Genetics: Deep Science and Deep Technology.Keekok Lee - 2003 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The last century saw two great revolutions in genetics the development of classic Mendelian theory and the discovery and investigation of DNA. Each fundamental scientific discovery in turn generated its own distinctive technology. These two case studies, examined in this text, enable the author to conduct a philosophical exploration of the relationship between fundamental scientific discoveries on the one hand, and the technologies that spring from them on the other. As such it is also an exercise in the philosophy of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  2. The Natural and the Artefactual the Implications of Deep Science and Deep Technology for Environmental Philosophy.Keekok Lee - 1999
  3. There is Biodiversity and Biodiversity: Implications for Environmental Philosophy.Keekok Lee - 2004 - In Markku Oksanen & Juhani Pietarinen (eds.), Philosophy and Biodiversity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 152--171.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4.  41
    The Source and Locus of Intrinsic Value: A Reexamination.Keekok Lee - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (3):297-309.
    In the literature of environmental philosophy, the single most potent argument that has been made against the claim that nature may possess intrinsic value in any objective sense is the Humean thesis of projectivism and its associated view that human consciousness is the source of all values. Theorists, in one way or another, have to face up to this challenge. For instance, J. Baird Callicott upholds this Humean foundation to modern Western philosophy. However, by distinguishing between the source and locus (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  5.  16
    The Philosophical Foundations of Modern Medicine.Keekok Lee - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Exploring the philosophical foundation of modern medicine this book explains why it possesses the characteristics it does, accounting for both its strengths as well as its weaknesses.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  16
    The Source and Locus of Intrinsic Value.Keekok Lee - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (3):297-309.
    In the literature of environmental philosophy, the single most potent argument that has been made against the claim that nature may possess intrinsic value in any objective sense is the Humean thesis of projectivism and its associated view that human consciousness is the source of all values. Theorists, in one way or another, have to face up to this challenge. For instance, J. Baird Callicott upholds this Humean foundation to modern Western philosophy. However, by distinguishing between the source and locus (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7.  22
    Patenting and Transgenic Organisms.Keekok Lee - 2003 - Techne 6 (3):166-175.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. The Legal-Rational State a Comparison of Hobbes, Bentham, and Kelsen.Keekok Lee, Thomas Hobbes, Jeremy Bentham & Hans Kelsen - 1990
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  23
    A New Basis for Moral Philosophy.Keekok Lee - 1985 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    I THE SOURCES OF THE FACT/ VALUE DISTINCTION The Naturalistic Fallacy is considered to be the biggest single obstacle to any attempt to argue for a rational ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  20
    Global Sustainable Development in the 21st Century.Keekok Lee, , Alan Holland, & Desmond McNeill - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  28
    Awe and Humility: Intrinsic Value in Nature. Beyond an Earthbound Environmental Ethics.Keekok Lee - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:89-101.
    This paper argues for a conception of intrinsic value which, it is hoped, will do justice to the following issues: 1) Nature need not and should not be understood to refer only to what exists on Earth; 2) an environmental ethics informed by features unique to Earth may be misleading and prove inadequate as technology increasingly threatens to invade and colonize other planets; 3) a comprehensive environmental ethics must encompass not only our attitude to Earth, but to other planets as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  8
    Patenting and Transgenic Organisms.Keekok Lee - 2003 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 6 (3):166-175.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  19
    Instrumentalism and the Last Person Argument.Keekok Lee - 1993 - Environmental Ethics 15 (4):333-344.
    The last person, or people, argument (LPA) is often assumed to be a potent weapon against a purely instrumental attitude toward nature, for it is said to imply the permissible destruction of nature under certain circumstances. I distinguish between three types of instrumentalism—strong instrumentalism (I) and two forms of weak instrumentalism: (IIa), which includes the psychological and aesthetic use ofnature, and (IIb), which focuses on the public service use of nature—and examine them in terms of two scenarios, the après moi, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Technology: History and Philosophy.Keekok Lee - 2005 - Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):17.
    It is sometimes remarked that while the preoccupation with the history of technology is a mature and well-established discipline, the preoccupation with the philosophy of technology is at best recent, and at worst considered as marginal in academic terms. In contrast, its relative, the philosophy of science is eminently respectable and unquestioningly accepted by the philosophical community.This paper, first, briefly sets out the historical relationship between science and technology in the West. Against such a context, it then looks at the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Awe and Humility: Intrinsic Value in Nature. Beyond an Earthbound Environmental Ethics: Keekok Lee.Keekok Lee - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:89-101.
    This paper will argue for a conception of intrinsic value which, it is hoped, will do justice to the following issues: that Nature need not and should not be understood to refer only to what exists on this planet, Earth; that an environmental ethics informed by features unique to Earth may be misleading and prove inadequate as technology increasingly threatens to invade and colonize other planets in the solar system; that a comprehensive environmental ethics must encompass not only our attitude (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  5
    Beauty for Ever?Keekok Lee - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (3):213 - 225.
    This paper is not primarily about the philosophy of beauty with regard to landscape evaluation. Neither is it basically about the place of aesthetics in environmental philosophy. Rather, its aim is to argue that while aesthetics has a clear role to play, it cannot form the basis of an adequate environmental philosophy without presupposing that natural processes and their products have no role to play independent of the human evaluation of them in terms of their beauty. The limitations, especially of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  3
    An Animal: What is It?Keekok Lee - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (4):393-410.
    This paper will argue that posing the question 'what is an animal?' is neither irrelevant nor futile. By looking more closely at four conceptions of what is an animal as held implicitly by the general public, - by certain philosophers of animal liberation, by apologists for zoos and by the community of zoologists - it will attempt to show that the first three are partial and decontextualised. On the other hand, the zoological account is obviously more comprehensive, and it will (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Keekok Lee - 1990 - Philosophical Books 31 (1):59-61.
  19. Biology and Technology.Keekok Lee - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. "Envisioning a Sustainable Society: Learning Our Way Out", by Lester W. Milbrath. [REVIEW]Keekok Lee - 1993 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):105.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Global Sustainable Development in the Twenty-First Century.Keekok Lee, A. J. Holland & Desmond Mcneill - 2000
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Homo Faber: The Unity of the History and Philosophy of Technology.Keekok Lee - 2009 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Evan Selinger & Søren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 13.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Instrumentalism and the Last Person Argument.Keekok Lee - 1993 - Environmental Ethics 15 (4):333-344.
    The last person, or people, argument is often assumed to be a potent weapon against a purely instrumental attitude toward nature, for it is said to imply the permissible destruction of nature under certain circumstances. I distinguish between three types of instrumentalism—strong instrumentalism and two forms of weak instrumentalism:, which includes the psychological and aesthetic use ofnature, and, which focuses on the public service use of nature—and examine them in terms of two scenarios, the après moi, le déluge and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Patenting and Transgenic Organisms: A Philosophical Exploration.Keekok Lee - 2003 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 6 (3):166-175.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Sian Politics, Economy and Technology.Keekok Lee - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
  26. To De-Industrialize–Is It so Irrational?Keekok Lee - 1993 - In Andrew Dobson & Paul Lucardie (eds.), The Politics of Nature: Explorations in Green Political Theory. Routledge. pp. 105.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. The Natural and the Artefactual: The Implications of Deep Science and Deep Technology for Environmental Philosophy.Keekok Lee - 2000 - Environmental Values 9 (2):254-256.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. The Philosophical Foundations of Classical Chinese Medicine: Philosophy, Methodology, Science.Keekok Lee - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    This book makes Classical Chinese Medicine intelligible to those who are not familiar with the tradition and who may choose to dismiss it off-hand or to assess it negatively. Keekok Lee uses two related strategies: arguing that all science and therefore medicine cannot be understood without excavating its philosophical presuppositions and showing what those presuppositions are in the case of CCM compared with those of biomedicine.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Zoos: A Philosophical Tour.Keekok Lee - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book, Keekok Lee asks the question, "what is an animal, and how does our treatment of it within captivity affect its status as a being ?" This ontological treatment marks the first such approach in looking at animals in captivity. Engaging with the moral questions of zoo-keeping (is it morally justified to keep a wild animal in captivity?) as well as the ontological (what is it that we conserve in zoos after all? A wild animal or its shadow?), (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography