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Kei Yoshida [5]Keisuke Yoshida [1]Keiko Yoshida [1]Keina Yoshida [1]
  1.  30
    Re-Politicising Philosophy of Science: A Continuing Challenge for Social Epistemology.Kei Yoshida - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):365-378.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate how we can reunite social philosophy and philosophy of science to address problems in science and technology. First, referring to Don Howard?s, George Reisch?s, and Philip Mirowski?s works, I shall briefly explain how philosophy of science was depoliticised during the cold war. Second, I shall examine Steve Fuller?s criticism of Thomas Kuhn. Third, I shall scrutinise Philip Kitcher?s view of well-ordered science. Fourth, I shall emphasise the importance of autonomy and argue that (...)
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  2.  53
    Defending Scientific Study of the Social: Against Clifford Geertz (and His Critics).Kei Yoshida - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (3):289-314.
    This paper will defend scientific study of the social by scrutinizing Clifford Geertz's interpretive anthropology, and evolutionary psychologists' criticism of it. I shall critically examine Geertz's identification of anthropology with literary criticism, his assumption that a science of society is possible only on a positivist model, his view of the relation between culture and mind, and his anti anti-relativism. Then I shall discuss evolutionary psychologists' criticism of Geertz's view as an exemplar of the so-called "Standard Social Science Model." Finally, I (...)
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  3.  90
    Towards Intersectionality in the European Court of Human Rights: The Case of B.S. V Spain. [REVIEW]Keina Yoshida - 2013 - Feminist Legal Studies 21 (2):195-204.
    The term ‘intersectionality’ recognises the need for a ‘holistic approach’ in the determination of the right to be free from discrimination and violence. While the European Court of Human Rights has never expressly used the term, this article argues that the recent case of B.S. v Spain provides an example of a more robust use of Article 14 of the convention taking into account the real life experiences of those facing intersectional discrimination. The decision recognising the special vulnerability of a (...)
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  4. Rationality and Cultural Interpretivism: A Critical Assessment of Failed Solutions.Kei Yoshida - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Kei Yoshida critically assesses five different theoretical approaches to cultural interpretivism and conclusions on rationality. This book reveals the need for a cogent solution to the problem of rationality and urges social scientists to interpret symbolic systems' or agents’ intentions as well as explain the consequences of human actions.
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  5.  19
    Bare Nouns and Telicity in Japanese.Keiko Yoshida - 2008 - In Susan Rothstein (ed.), Theoretical and Crosslinguistic Approaches to the Semantics of Aspect. John Benjamins. pp. 421--439.
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  6.  8
    Der Schatten der Kierkegaard-Renaissance. Eine rezeptionsgeschichtliche Studie über die dezisionistisch-irrationalistischen Kierkegaard-Interpretationen zwischen den Weltkriegen in Deutschland.Keisuke Yoshida - 2015 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 20 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook Jahrgang: 20 Heft: 1 Seiten: 279-300.
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  7.  52
    Review Essay: Sociology as a Political Project: Fuller's Argument Against Bioliberalism.Kei Yoshida - 2009 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (1):99-106.
    In his book, The New Sociological Imagination, Steve Fuller criticizes what he calls “bioliberalism.” According to him, the social sciences are challenged on two sides: humanistic and biological. In particular, Fuller finds the biological challenge serious. Fuller tries to reinvent sociology as a socialist project to counterattack bioliberalism as the biggest threat to the social sciences. First, the author will examine Fuller's argument against bioliberalism, referring to the so-called “liberal eugenics.” Then the author will criticize him. By reinventing sociology as (...)
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