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Keith Michael Baker [14]Keith M. Baker [1]
  1. On Judith N. Shklar's Review of Baker's Condorcet.Keith M. Baker - 1976 - Political Theory 4 (3):374-376.
  2. Condorcet, From Natural Philosophy to Social Mathematics.Keith Michael Baker - 1975 - University of Chicago Press.
  3. A Foucauldian French Revolution?Keith Michael Baker - 1994 - In Jan Ellen Goldstein (ed.), Foucault and the Writing of History. Blackwell.
     
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  4.  1
    Revitalizing the Intellectual History of the French RevolutionLa Guillotine Et l'Imaginaire de la Terreur.Inventing the French Revolution: Essays on French Political Culture in the Eighteenth Century.Rousseau and the Republic of Virtue: The Language of Politics in the French Revolution.Revolution in Print: The Press in France, 1775-1800.Dictionnaire des Usages Sociopolitiques"Idees," Dictionnaire Critique de la Revolution Francaise."Gauss Seminars in Criticism".Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution. [REVIEW]Jack R. Censer, Daniel Arasse, Keith Michael Baker, Carol Blum, Robert Darnton, Daniel Roche, Francois Furet, Mona Ozouf, Lynn Hunt & Joan Landes - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (4):652.
  5.  1
    La Logique/LogicÉtienne de Condillac W. R. Albury.Keith Michael Baker - 1981 - Isis 72 (2):320-321.
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    Scientism at the End of the Old Regime: Reflections on a Theme of Professor Charles Gillispie. [REVIEW]Keith Michael Baker - 1987 - Minerva 25 (1-2):21-34.
    What is it that statesmen have generally wanted from science? They have not wanted admonitions or collaboration, much less interference, in the business of government, which is the exercise of power over persons, nor in the political maneuverings to secure and retain control over governments. From science, all the statesmen and politicians want are instrumentalities, powers but not power: weapons, techniques, information communications, and so on. As for scientists, what have they wanted of governments? They have expressly not wished to (...)
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  7. Condorcet: The Moral and Political Sciences.Keith Michael Baker - 1997 - In Raymond Boudon, Mohamed Cherkaoui & Jeffrey C. Alexander (eds.), The Classical Tradition in Sociology: The European Tradition. Sage Publications. pp. 152.
     
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  8. Essai sur l'application de l'analyse à la probabilité des décisions rendues à la pluralité des voixM. le Marquis de CondorcetCondorcet. Mathématique et sociétéRoshdi Rashed.Keith Michael Baker - 1976 - Isis 67 (2):311-312.
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  9. Foundations of Social Choice and Political Theory. Condorcet, Iain McLean, Fiona Hewitt.Keith Michael Baker - 1997 - Isis 88 (1):148-149.
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  10. Inventing the French Revolution `: Essays on French Political Culture in the Eighteenth Century.Keith Michael Baker - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the French Revolution become thinkable? Keith Michael Baker, a leading authority on the ideological origins of the French Revolution, explores this question in his wide-ranging collection of essays. Analyzing the new politics of contestation that transformed the traditional political culture of the Old Regime during its last decades, Baker revises our historical map of the political space in which the French Revolution took form. Some essays study the ways in which the revolutionaries' break with the past was prepared (...)
     
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  11. Inventing the French Revolution: Essays on French Political Culture in the Eighteenth Century.Keith Michael Baker - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the French Revolution become thinkable? Keith Michael Baker, a leading authority on the ideological origins of the French Revolution, explores this question in his wide-ranging collection of essays. Analyzing the new politics of contestation that transformed the traditional political culture of the Old Regime during its last decades, Baker revises our historical map of the political space in which the French Revolution took form. Some essays study the ways in which the revolutionaries' break with the past was prepared (...)
     
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  12. What's Left of Enlightenment?: A Postmodern Question.Keith Michael Baker & Peter Hanns Reill (eds.) - 2001 - Stanford University Press.
    For all their differences, the many varieties of thinking commonly known as postmodernism share at least one salient characteristic: they all depend upon a stereotyped account of the Enlightenment. Postmodernity requires a 'modernity' to be repudiated, and the tenets of this modernity have invariably been identified with the Enlightenment Project. This volume aims to explore critically the opposition between Enlightenment and Postmodernity and question some of the conclusions drawn from it. The authors focus on three general areas. Part I, Enlightenment (...)
     
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