22 found
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Keith W. Miller [14]Keith Miller [7]Keith Bruce Miller [2]Keith Graber Miller [1]
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Keith Miller
University of Ottawa
  1. Self-Driving Cars and Engineering Ethics: The Need for a System Level Analysis.Jason Borenstein, Joseph R. Herkert & Keith W. Miller - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (2):383-398.
    The literature on self-driving cars and ethics continues to grow. Yet much of it focuses on ethical complexities emerging from an individual vehicle. That is an important but insufficient step towards determining how the technology will impact human lives and society more generally. What must complement ongoing discussions is a broader, system level of analysis that engages with the interactions and effects that these cars will have on one another and on the socio-technical systems in which they are embedded. To (...)
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  2.  99
    Un-making artificial moral agents.Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
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  3.  23
    The Boeing 737 MAX: Lessons for Engineering Ethics.Joseph Herkert, Jason Borenstein & Keith Miller - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):2957-2974.
    The crash of two 737 MAX passenger aircraft in late 2018 and early 2019, and subsequent grounding of the entire fleet of 737 MAX jets, turned a global spotlight on Boeing’s practices and culture. Explanations for the crashes include: design flaws within the MAX’s new flight control software system designed to prevent stalls; internal pressure to keep pace with Boeing’s chief competitor, Airbus; Boeing’s lack of transparency about the new software; and the lack of adequate monitoring of Boeing by the (...)
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  4. The ethics of designing artificial agents.Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):115-121.
    In their important paper “Autonomous Agents”, Floridi and Sanders use “levels of abstraction” to argue that computers are or may soon be moral agents. In this paper we use the same levels of abstraction to illuminate differences between human moral agents and computers. In their paper, Floridi and Sanders contributed definitions of autonomy, moral accountability and responsibility, but they have not explored deeply some essential questions that need to be answered by computer scientists who design artificial agents. One such question (...)
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  5.  49
    This “Ethical Trap” Is for Roboticists, Not Robots: On the Issue of Artificial Agent Ethical Decision-Making.Keith W. Miller, Marty J. Wolf & Frances Grodzinsky - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):389-401.
    In this paper we address the question of when a researcher is justified in describing his or her artificial agent as demonstrating ethical decision-making. The paper is motivated by the amount of research being done that attempts to imbue artificial agents with expertise in ethical decision-making. It seems clear that computing systems make decisions, in that they make choices between different options; and there is scholarship in philosophy that addresses the distinction between ethical decision-making and general decision-making. Essentially, the qualitative (...)
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  6.  26
    Developing Automated Deceptions and the Impact on Trust.Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (1):91-105.
    As software developers design artificial agents , they often have to wrestle with complex issues, issues that have philosophical and ethical importance. This paper addresses two key questions at the intersection of philosophy and technology: What is deception? And when is it permissible for the developer of a computer artifact to be deceptive in the artifact’s development? While exploring these questions from the perspective of a software developer, we examine the relationship of deception and trust. Are developers using deception to (...)
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  7.  16
    Information systems ethics – challenges and opportunities.Simon Rogerson, Keith W. Miller, Jenifer Sunrise Winter & David Larson - 2019 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 17 (1):87-97.
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the ethical issues surrounding information systems practice with a view to encouraging greater involvement in this aspect of IS research. Information integrity relies upon the development and operation of computer-based information systems. Those who undertake the planning, development and operation of these information systems have obligations to assure information integrity and overall to contribute to the public good. This ethical dimension of information systems has attracted mixed attention in the IS academic (...)
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  8.  27
    Critiquing a critique.Keith W. Miller - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):245-249.
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  9.  4
    There’s something in your eye: ethical implications of augmented visual field devices.Marty J. Wolf, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Keith W. Miller - 2016 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 14 (3):214-230.
    Purpose This paper aims to explore the ethical and social impact of augmented visual field devices, identifying issues that AVFDs share with existing devices and suggesting new ethical and social issues that arise with the adoption of AVFDs. Design/methodology/approach This essay incorporates both a philosophical and an ethical analysis approach. It is based on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, philosophical notions of transparency and presence and human values including psychological well-being, physical well-being, privacy, deception, informed consent, ownership and property and (...)
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  10.  78
    Review of Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW]Keith W. Miller & Bethany J. Spielman - 2008 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
  11.  39
    Software informed consent: Docete emptorem, not caveat emptor. [REVIEW]Keith Miller - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):357-362.
    Should software be sold “as is”, totally guaranteed, or something else? This paper suggests that “informed consent”, used extensively in medical ethics, is an appropriate way to envision the buyer/developer relationship when software is sold. We review why the technical difficulties preclude delivering perfect software, but allow statistical predictions about reliability. Then we borrow principles refined by medical ethics and apply them to computer professionals.
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  12.  1
    Ideology and Moral Philosophy: The Relation of Moral Ideology to Dynamic Moral Philosophy.Keith Bruce Miller - 1971 - New York: Humanities Press.
  13.  1
    The Ethics of Information Technologies.Keith Miller & Mariarosaria Taddeo - 2016 - Routledge.
    This volume collects key influential papers that have animated the debate about information computer ethics over the past three decades, covering issues such as privacy, online trust, anonymity, values sensitive design, machine ethics, professional conduct and moral responsibility of software developers. These previously published articles have set the tone of the discussion and bringing them together here in one volume provides lecturers and students with a one-stop resource with which to navigate the debate.
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  14.  19
    Dynamic technology challenges static codes of ethics.Bo Brinkman, Catherine Flick, Don Gotterbarn, Keith Miller, Kate Vazansky & Marty J. Wolf - 2017 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 47 (3):7-24.
    We describe the process of changing and the changes being suggested for the ACM Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. In addition to addressing the technical and ethical basis for the proposed changes, we identify suggestions that commenters made in response to the first draft. We invite feedback on the proposed changes and on the suggestions that commenters made.
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  15.  26
    Anonymity, pseudonymity, or inescapable identity on the net (abstract).Deborah G. Johnson & Keith Miller - 1998 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (2):37-38.
    The first topic of concern is anonymity, specifically the anonymity that is available in communications on the Internet. An earlier paper argues that anonymity in electronic communication is problematic because: it makes law enforcement difficult ; it frees individuals to behave in socially undesirable and harmful ways ; it diminishes the integrity of information since one can't be sure who information is coming from, whether it has been altered on the way, etc.; and all three of the above contribute to (...)
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  16.  15
    Yes, but … our response to: “professional ethics in the information age”.Donald Gotterbarn & Keith W. Miller - 2017 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 15 (4):357-361.
    Purpose This short viewpoint is a response to a lead paper on professional ethics in the information age. This paper aims to draw upon the authors’ experience of professional bodies such as the ACM over many years. Points of agreement and disagreement are highlighted with the aim of promoting wider debate. Design/methodology/approach An analysis of the lead paper is undertaken using a binary agree/disagree approach. This highlights the conflicting views which can then be considered in more detail. Findings Four major (...)
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  17.  21
    Web standards: Why so many stray from the narrow path: Commentary on “attributes of a national ethics web site”.Keith W. Miller - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):477-479.
  18.  9
    All hands on deck for ACM Ethics.Bo Brinkman, Don Gotterbarn, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf - 2016 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 46 (3):5-8.
    The Association for Computing Machinery's Committee on Professional Ethics has been charged to execute three major projects over the next two years: updating ACM's Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, revising the enforcement procedures for the Code, and developing new media to promote integrity in the profession. We cannot do this alone, and we are asking SIGCAS members to volunteer and get involved. We will briefly describe the rationale and plan behind these projects and describe opportunities to get involved.
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  19.  5
    Applying a Social-Relational Model to Explore the Curious Case of hitchBOT.Keith Miller, Marty Wolf & Frances Grodzinsky - 2019 - In Matteo Vincenzo D'Alfonso & Don Berkich (eds.), On the Cognitive, Ethical, and Scientific Dimensions of Artificial Intelligence. Springer Verlag. pp. 311-323.
    This paper applies social-relational models of moral standing of robots to cases where the encounters between the robot and humans are relatively brief. Our analysis spans the spectrum of non-social robots to fully-social robots. We consider cases where the encounters are between a stranger and the robot and do not include its owner or operator. We conclude that the developers of robots that might be encountered by other people when the owner is not present cannot wash their hands of responsibility. (...)
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  20.  11
    Free, source-code-available, or proprietary: an ethically charged, context-sensitive choice.Marty J. Wolf, Keith W. Miller & Frances S. Grodzinsky - 2009 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (1):15-26.
    We demonstrate that different categories of software raise different ethical concerns with respect to whether software ought to be Free Software or Proprietary Software. We outline the ethical tension between Free Software and Proprietary Software that stems from the two kinds of licenses. For some categories of software we develop support for normative statements regarding the software development landscape. We claim that as society's use of software changes, the ethical analysis for that category of software must necessarily be repeated. Finally, (...)
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  21.  16
    Ethics in the IT Classroom.David Larson & Keith W. Miller - 2009 - Journal of Information Ethics 18 (2):38-49.
  22.  11
    Angels and artifacts: Moral agents in the age of computers and networks.Keith Miller & David Larson - 2005 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 3 (3):151-157.
    Traditionally, philosophers have ascribed moral agency almost exclusively to humans. Early writing about moral agency can be traced to Aristotle and Aquinas. In addition to human moral agents, Aristotle discussed the possibility of moral agency of the Greek gods and Aquinas discussed the possibility of moral agency of angels. In the case of angels, a difficulty in ascribing moral agency was that it was suspected that angels did not have enough independence from God to ascribe to the angels genuine moral (...)
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