44 found
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  1. Towards a Cognitive Theory of Emotions.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (1):29-50.
  2.  15
    Towards a Cognitive Theory of Emotions.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (1):29-50.
  3.  39
    Fiction: Simulation of Social Worlds.Keith Oatley - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (8):618-628.
  4.  39
    The Language of Emotions: An Analysis of a Semantic Field.P. N. Johnson-Laird & Keith Oatley - 1989 - Cognition and Emotion 3 (2):81-123.
  5.  22
    Perceptions and Representations: The Theoretical Bases of Brain Research and Psychology.Keith Oatley - 1978 - Methuen.
    problems in psychology The three themes of this book are the relation of the brain's structure to psychological function, the problem of how people perceive ...
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  6.  36
    Exploring the Link Between Reading Fiction and Empathy: Ruling Out Individual Differences and Examining Outcomes.Jordan B. Peterson, Keith Oatley & Raymond A. Mar - 2009 - Communications 34 (4):407-428.
    Readers of fiction tend to have better abilities of empathy and theory of mind. We present a study designed to replicate this finding, rule out one possible explanation, and extend the assessment of social outcomes. In order to rule out the role of personality, we first identified Openness as the most consistent correlate. This trait was then statistically controlled for, along with two other important individual differences: the tendency to be drawn into stories and gender. Even after accounting for these (...)
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  7. Best Laid Schemes: The Psychology of the Emotions.Keith Oatley - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    Keith Oatley draws on theories from psychology, philosophy and linguistics, as well as writings from other social sciences, to show how emotions are central to any understanding of human actions and mental life.
     
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  8.  33
    Communications to Self and Others: Emotional Experience and its Skills.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):206-213.
    According to the Communicative Theory of Emotions, we experience emotions when events occur that are important for our goals and plans. A method of choice for studying these matters is the emotion diary. Emotions configure our cognitive systems and our relationships. Many of our emotions concern our relationships, and empathy is central to our experience of them. We do not always recognize our emotions or the emotions of others, but literary fiction can help improve our skills of recognition and understanding.
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  9.  75
    Cognitive Approaches to Emotions.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):134-140.
  10.  67
    Emotion and Narrative Fiction: Interactive Influences Before, During, and After Reading.Raymond A. Mar, Keith Oatley, Maja Djikic & Justin Mullin - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):818-833.
  11. On Changing One's Mind: A Possible Function of Consciousness.Keith Oatley - 1988 - In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 369--389.
  12.  21
    Basic Emotions, Rationality, and Folk Theory.P. N. Johnson-Laird & Keith Oatley - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):201-223.
  13.  52
    Basic Emotions in Social Relationships, Reasoning, and Psychological Illnesses.Keith Oatley & Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):424-433.
    The communicative theory of emotions postulates that emotions are communications both within the brain and between individuals. Basic emotions owe their evolutionary origins to social mammals, and they enable human beings to use repertoires of mental resources appropriate to recurring and distinctive kinds of events. These emotions also enable them to cooperate with other individuals, to compete with them, and to disengage from them. The human system of emotions has also grafted onto basic emotions propositional contents about the cause of (...)
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  14.  11
    Cognition and Emotionover Twenty-Five Years.Keith Oatley, W. Gerrod Parrott, Craig Smith & Fraser Watts - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1341-1348.
  15.  10
    Two Movements in Emotions: Communication and Reflection.Keith Oatley - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (1):29-35.
    In understanding the degree of choice we have in our emotions, we benefit from the Stoics’ analysis into first and second movements: appraisals and reappraisals. The Stoics were concerned to avoid the harm that emotions can cause, but their idea of working on goals, rather than on emotions as such, generalizes beyond their concerns. For modern people, the problem of taking responsibility for our emotional life becomes less paradoxical when we consider interpersonal issues.
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  16.  63
    Love and Personal Relationships: Navigating on the Border Between the Ideal and the Real.Maja Djikic & Keith Oatley - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (2):199–209.
    In the psychological literature, love is often seen as a construct inseparable from that of close, interpersonal relationships. As a result, it has been often assumed that the same motivational factors underlie both phenomena. This often leads researchers to propose that love does not exist in itself—that it is an emotion which stems solely from a need for attachment, fulfillment of reproductive aims, or for social exchange. The popular cultural imagination, however, perceives love as a unique, mysterious, altruistic, ever-lasting bond (...)
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  17.  21
    The Experience of Emotions in Everyday Life.Keith Oatley & Elaine Duncan - 1994 - Cognition and Emotion 8 (4):369-381.
  18.  10
    Semantic Primitives for Emotions: A Reply to Ortony and Clore.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 1990 - Cognition and Emotion 4 (2):129-143.
  19.  17
    Worlds of the Possible: Abstraction, Imagination, Consciousness.Keith Oatley - 2013 - Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (3):448-468.
    The ability to think in abstractions depends on the imagination. An important evolutionary change was the installation of a suite of six imaginative activities that emerge at first in childhood, which include empathy, symbolic play, and theory-of-mind. These abilities can be built upon in adulthood to enable the production of oral and written stories. As a technology, writing has three aspects: material, skill based, and societal. It is in fiction that expertise in writing is most strikingly attained; imagination is put (...)
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  20.  22
    Basic Emotions: Theory and Measurement.Nancy L. Stein & Keith Oatley - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):161-168.
  21.  5
    Worlds of the Possible.Keith Oatley - 2013 - Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (3):448-468.
    The ability to think in abstractions depends on the imagination. An important evolutionary change was the installation of a suite of six imaginative activities that emerge at first in childhood, which include empathy, symbolic play, and theory-of-mind. These abilities can be built upon in adulthood to enable the production of oral and written stories. As a technology, writing has three aspects: material, skill based, and societal. It is in fiction that expertise in writing is most strikingly attained; imagination is put (...)
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  22.  10
    Appraisal, Computational Models, and Scherer's Expert System.Greg Chwelos & Keith Oatley - 1994 - Cognition and Emotion 8 (3):245-257.
  23.  49
    Conflict and Control Among Mental Agents.Keith Oatley - 1986 - Journal of Semantics 5 (2):165-168.
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  24.  8
    On the Definition and Function of Emotions.Keith Oatley - 2007 - Social Science Information 46 (3):415-419.
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  25.  7
    A Social-Cognitive Theory of Depression in Reaction to Life Events.Keith Oatley & Winifred Bolton - 1985 - Psychological Review 92 (3):372-388.
  26.  21
    The Intentional and Social Nature of Human Emotions: Reconsideration of the Distinction Between Basic and Non‐Basic Emotions.Aaron Ben‐ze'ev & Keith Oatley - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (1):81-94.
  27.  10
    Editorial: Cognitive Science and the Understanding of Emotions.Keith Oatley - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (3):209-216.
  28. Narrative Modes of Consciousness and Selfhood.Keith Oatley - 2007 - In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  29.  4
    Are There Only Two Primitive Emotions? A Reply to Frijda.P. N. Johnson-Laird & Keith Oatley - 1988 - Cognition and Emotion 2 (2):89-93.
  30.  26
    An Emotion's Emergence, Unfolding, and Potential for Empathy: A Study of Resentment by the “Psychologist of Avon”.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (1):24-30.
    To understand human emotions we need, alongside appraisal, the concept of emergence (derivation from the expectations of relationships) and the concept of unfolding (of sequences that can be expressed as narratives). These processes can be seen in resentment, which has not been studied extensively in psychology. It is associated with envy, and it can be thought of as a kind of destructive anger. Such issues can be studied in works of literature: simulations of the social world in which emotions can (...)
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  31.  25
    Modeling Paranoia: The Cargo Cult Metaphor.Keith Oatley - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):545-546.
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  32.  23
    How Emotions Occur: A Reply to Commentaries by Neu, Sundararajan, and Reisenzein.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (1):37-38.
    Response to commentaries by Neu, Sundararajan, and Reisenzein.
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  33.  20
    Emotional Payoffs.Keith Oatley - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):55-57.
  34.  15
    Emotions and Human Flourishing.Keith Oatley - 1997 - Cognition and Emotion 11 (3):307-330.
  35.  17
    Emotions and Transformation Varieties of Experience of Identity.Keith Oatley & Maja Djikic - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (9-10):9-10.
    The Varieties of Religious Experience is an exploration of personal narratives about religious experience, but as one might gather from the epigraph to this article, James treats religion in an eccentric way. He takes religious experience to mean something close to the emotional experience of identity. His central question is how one might discover happiness within oneself and in one's relations with others, or if such happiness seems far distant, how one might achieve a change that will accomplish a new (...)
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  36.  13
    Side Effects: Limitations of Human Rationality.Keith Oatley - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):24-25.
  37.  14
    Gaps in Consciousness: Emotions and Memory in Psychoanalysis.Keith Oatley - 1988 - Cognition and Emotion 2 (1):3-18.
  38.  10
    Development of Social Emotions and Constructive Agents.Aaron Ben Ze'ev & Keith Oatley - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):124-125.
  39.  3
    Art as Emotional Exploration.Keith Oatley - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  40.  17
    The Space in Between: The Development of Joint Thinking and Planning.Jennifer M. Jenkins & Keith Oatley - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):112-113.
    We argue that theory-of-mind understanding has developed to facilitate joint thinking and planning, defined as the creation of new mental objects that could not have been created by one mind. Three components of this ability are proposed: the mental architecture indexed by false belief understanding, domain-specific knowledge, and the prioritization of the joint mind over the individual mind.
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  41.  7
    Reliable Computation in Parallel Networks.Keith Oatley - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):299-299.
  42.  7
    Freud's Cognitive Psychology of Intention: The Case of Dora.Keith Oatley - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (1):69-86.
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  43.  4
    Living Together.Keith Oatley - 1991 - Cognition and Emotion 5 (1):65-79.
  44. Representing Ourselves: Mental Schemata, Computational Metaphors, and the Nature of Consciousness.Keith Oatley - 1981 - In G. Underwood & R. Stevens (eds.), Aspects of Consciousness, Volume 2. Academic Press.