6 found
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  1. Alphonso Lingis, Deathbound Subjectivity Reviewed by.Ken A. Bryson - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (7):283-285.
  2. Anne Hartle, Death and the Disinterested Spectator: An Inquiry into the Nature of Philosophy Reviewed by.Ken A. Bryson - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (10):409-410.
     
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  3. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China.Ken A. Bryson & Fan Liu - 2009 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 29 (5):397-407.
    The infamous “Sydney Tar Ponds” are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief introduction and history and summaries of the effects on the earth, the people, and the biotic community. Then the authors talk about (...)
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  4.  66
    Negotiating environmental rights.Ken A. Bryson - 2008 - Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):351 – 366.
    Environmental ethics arises as the output of a trade-off between our rights and nature's right to life. This negotiation secures the possibility of achieving sustainable developments, if it is conducted fairly. The rights of persons are delimited by their origin, as are the rights of the other. A person is the output of relationships taking place at three levels: (1) a material self; (2) a social self; and (3) a private or internal self. Pollution and war serve as an epitaph (...)
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    Christian Metaphysics and Human Death.Ken A. Bryson - 2015 - Philosophy and Theology 27 (2):259-288.
    The realist belief in the primacy of the world and its underlying structure answers the question ‘why is there something rather than nothing.’ The world, and all things contained in it exists because of God’s creative act. Personal death in Christian philosophy continues the gift of human existence by shifting that temporal existence into eternal life. The death and resurrection of Christ lays the foundation for the possibility of eternal life, while the will of God provides an answer to the (...)
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  6. Merold Westphal, God, Guilt, and Death Reviewed by.Ken A. Bryson - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (1):41-43.
     
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