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  1.  11
    Nursing and euthanasia: A narrative review of the nursing ethics literature.Barbara Pesut, Madeleine Greig, Sally Thorne, Janet Storch, Michael Burgess, Carol Tishelman, Kenneth Chambaere & Robert Janke - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301984512.
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  2.  6
    Views of disability rights organisations on assisted dying legislation in England, Wales and Scotland: an analysis of position statements.Graham Box & Kenneth Chambaere - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e64-e64.
    Assisted dying is a divisive and controversial topic and it is therefore desirable that a broad range of interests inform any proposed policy changes. The purpose of this study is to collect and synthesize the views of an important stakeholder group—namely people with disabilities —as expressed by disability rights organisations in Great Britain. Parliamentary consultations were reviewed, together with an examination of the contemporary positions of a wide range of DROs. Our analysis revealed that the vast majority do not have (...)
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  3.  12
    Does legal physician-assisted dying impede development of palliative care? The Belgian and Benelux experience.Kenneth Chambaere & Jan L. Bernheim - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):657-660.
  4.  11
    Controversies surrounding continuous deep sedation at the end of life: the parliamentary and societal debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying. The practice is generally considered to be legal as a form of symptom control, although this is mostly only assumed. France has passed an amendment to the Public Health Act that would grant certain terminally ill patients an explicit right to continuous deep sedation until they pass away. Such a (...)
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  5.  23
    Labelling of end-of-life decisions by physicians.Jef Deyaert, Kenneth Chambaere, Joachim Cohen, Marc Roelands & Luc Deliens - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):505-507.
    Objectives Potentially life-shortening medical end-of-life practices ) remain subject to conceptual vagueness. This study evaluates how physicians label these practices by examining which of their own practices they label as euthanasia or sedation.Methods We conducted a large stratified random sample of death certificates from 2007 . The physicians named on the death certificate were approached by means of a postal questionnaire asking about ELDs made in each case and asked to choose the most appropriate label to describe the ELD. Response (...)
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  6.  15
    Controversies surrounding continuous deep sedation at the end of life: the parliamentary and societal debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying...
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  7.  21
    Forgoing artificial nutrition or hydration at the end of life: a large cross-sectional survey in Belgium.Kenneth Chambaere, Ilse Loodts, Luc Deliens & Joachim Cohen - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):501-504.
    Objectives To examine the frequency and characteristics of decisions to forgo artificial nutrition and/or hydration at the end of life.Design Postal questionnaire survey regarding end-of-life decisions to physicians certifying a large representative sample of Belgian death certificates in 2007.Setting Flanders, Belgium, 2007.Participants Treating physicians of deceased patients.Results Response rate was 58.4%. A decision to forgo ANH occurred in 6.6% of all deaths . Being female, dying in a care home or hospital and suffering from nervous system diseases or malignancies were (...)
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