22 found
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  1. Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology.Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) - 2008 - Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    This multidisciplinary collection explores three key concepts underpinning psychiatry -- explanation, phenomenology, and nosology -- and their continuing relevance in an age of neuroimaging and genetic analysis. An introduction by Kenneth S. Kendler lays out the philosophical grounding of psychiatric practice. The first section addresses the concept of explanation, from the difficulties in describing complex behavior to the categorization of psychological and biological causality. In the second section, contributors discuss experience, including the complex and vexing issue of how self-agency and (...)
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  2.  61
    Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology.Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Psychiatry has long struggled with the nature of its diagnoses. This book brings together established experts in the wide range of disciplines that have an interest in psychiatric nosology. The contributors include philosophers, psychologists, psychiatrists, historians and representatives of the efforts of DSM-III, DSM-IV and DSM-V.
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  3. The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: An Historical and Philosophical Analysis.Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):41-63.
    This essay selectively reviews, from an historical and philosophical perspective, the dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS; Table 1 lists the abbreviations used in this essay). Our goal is not to adjudicate the validity of the theory—although we arrive at a generally skeptical conclusion—but to focus on the process whereby the DHS has evolved over time and been evaluated. Since its inception, the DHS has been the most prominent etiologic theory in psychiatry and is still referred to widely in current (...)
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  4.  19
    Gloomy Prospects and Roller Coasters: Finding Coherence in Genome-Wide Association Studies.Carl F. Craver, Mikhail Dozmorov, Mark Reimers & Kenneth S. Kendler - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):1084-1095.
    We address Turkheimer’s argument that genome-wide association studies of behaviors and psychiatric traits will fail to produce coherent explanations. We distinguish two major sources of potential i...
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  5. The incredible insecurity of psychiatric nosology.Kenneth S. Kendler & Peter Zachar - 2008 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  6. Comments: Phenomenology, nosology and prototypes.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press.
  7. The removal of pluto from the class of planets and homosexuality from the class of psychiatric disorders: a comparison.Peter Zachar & Kenneth S. Kendler - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:4.
    We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification problem thorny.
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  8. Philosophical issues in psychiatry.Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  9.  36
    Epistemic iteration as a historical model for psychiatric nosology: promises and limitations.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press. pp. 305.
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  10. Introduction.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry IV: Psychiatric Nosology.Kenneth S. Kendler & Joseph Parnas (eds.) - 2017
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  12.  17
    Polygene risk scores and randomized experiments.Lauren N. Ross, Kenneth S. Kendler & James F. Woodward - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e198.
    We explore Madole & Harden's (2022) suggestion that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)/trait correlations are analogous to randomized experiments and thus can be given a causal interpretation.
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  13.  14
    Comment: Disorders of Agency in Psychiatric Syndromes.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2008 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 16--3.
  14.  20
    Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Iii: The Nature and Sources of Historical Change.Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Psychiatry has been subject to major changes in the last 150 years. This book explores the forces that have shaped these changes and how they have impacted on the psychiatric profession in this time. The result is a dynamic discussion about the nature of psychiatric disorders, and a book that is compelling reading.
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  15.  46
    A constructionist account of emotional disorders.Angélique Oj Cramer, Kenneth S. Kendler & Denny Borsboom - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):146-147.
    Lindquist et al. present a strong case for a constructionist account of emotion. First, we elaborate on the ramifications that a constructionist account of emotions might have for psychiatric disorders with emotional disturbances as core elements. Second, we reflect on similarities between Lindquist et al.'s model and recent attempts at formulating psychiatric disorders as networks of causally related symptoms.
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  16.  12
    Phenomenology, nosology and prototypes.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press. pp. 260.
  17.  28
    A psychiatric perspective on the “nature of nurture”.Kenneth S. Kendler - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):398-399.
  18.  50
    Further Thoughts on the Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia.Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):73-75.
    We are gratified at the largely positive comments on our essay on the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) by these two distinguished commentators from the fields of biological psychiatry (Dr. Tamminga) and the philosophy of psychiatry (Dr. Murphy). There is little that they have said with which we disagree. Rather, we want to expand briefly on their commentaries.We found Dr. Tamminga's reactions to be particularly fascinating because she has been an "insider" to the story of the DHS as it has (...)
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  19. Kraepelin's Final Views on Dementia Praecox.Kenneth S. Kendler - 2020 - Schizophrenia Bulletin.
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  20.  22
    Levels of Analysis in Psychopathology: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives.Kenneth S. Kendler, Josef Parnas & Peter Zachar (eds.) - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Levels of Analysis in Psychopathology draws research from psychiatry, philosophy, and psychology to explore the variety of explanatory approaches for understanding the nature of psychiatric disorders both in practice and research. The fields of psychiatry and clinical psychology incorporates many useful explanatory approaches and this book integrates this range of perspectives and makes suggestions about how to advance etiologic theories, classification, and treatment. The editors have brought together leading thinkers who have been widely published and are well-respected in their area (...)
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  21.  8
    Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Iv: Psychiatric Nosology.Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    The revisions of both DSM-IV and ICD-10 have again focused the interest of the field of psychiatry and clinical psychology on the questions of nosology. This book reviews issues within psychiatric nosology from clinical, historical and particularly philosophical perspectives. It brings together an interdisciplinary group of distinguished authors.
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  22.  47
    Changing The Definition of The Kilogram: Insights For Psychiatric Disease Classification.Hanna M. Van Loo, Jan-Willem Romeijn & Kenneth S. Kendler - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (4):97-108.
    In psychiatry, many scientists desire to move from a classification system based on symptoms toward a system based on biological causes. The idea is that psychiatric diseases should be redefined such that each disease would be associated with specific biological causes. This desire is intelligible because causal disease models often facilitate understanding and identification of new ways to intervene in disease processes. In its attempt to move from syndromal to specific etiological definitions, psychiatry follows the trend of general medicine.Current psychiatric...
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