83 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Kevin C. Elliott [48]Kevin Elliott [25]Kevin J. Elliott [6]Kevin Christopher Elliott [4]
See also
  1.  55
    A Tapestry of Values: An Introduction to Values in Science.Kevin Christopher Elliott - 2017 - New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    The role of values in scientific research has become an important topic of discussion in both scholarly and popular debates. Pundits across the political spectrum worry that research on topics like climate change, evolutionary theory, vaccine safety, and genetically modified foods has become overly politicized. At the same time, it is clear that values play an important role in science by limiting unethical forms of research and by deciding what areas of research have the greatest relevance for society. Deciding how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   84 citations  
  2. Nonepistemic Values and the Multiple Goals of Science.Kevin C. Elliott & Daniel J. McKaughan - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (1):1-21.
    Recent efforts to argue that nonepistemic values have a legitimate role to play in assessing scientific models, theories, and hypotheses typically either reject the distinction between epistemic and nonepistemic values or incorporate nonepistemic values only as a secondary consideration for resolving epistemic uncertainty. Given that scientific representations can legitimately be evaluated not only based on their fit with the world but also with respect to their fit with the needs of their users, we show in two case studies that nonepistemic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  3.  34
    Exploring Inductive Risk: Case Studies of Values in Science.Kevin Christopher Elliott & Ted Richards (eds.) - 2017 - New York: Oup Usa.
    This book brings together eleven case studies of inductive risk-the chance that scientific inference is incorrect-that range over a wide variety of scientific contexts and fields. The chapters are designed to illustrate the pervasiveness of inductive risk, assist scientists and policymakers in responding to it, and productively move theoretical discussions of the topic forward.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  4. A Taxonomy of Transparency in Science.Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):342-355.
    Both scientists and philosophers of science have recently emphasized the importance of promoting transparency in science. For scientists, transparency is a way to promote reproducibility, progress, and trust in research. For philosophers of science, transparency can help address the value-ladenness of scientific research in a responsible way. Nevertheless, the concept of transparency is a complex one. Scientists can be transparent about many different things, for many different reasons, on behalf of many different stakeholders. This paper proposes a taxonomy that clarifies (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  5.  72
    Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research.Kevin Christopher Elliott - 2010 - , US: Oup Usa.
    Could low-level exposure to polluting chemicals be analogous to exercise -- a beneficial source of stress that strengthens the body? Some scientists studying the phenomenon of hormesis claim that that this may be the case.s A Little Pollution Good For You? critically examines the current evidence for hormesis.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  6. Douglas on values: From indirect roles to multiple goals.Kevin C. Elliott - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):375-383.
    In recent papers and a book, Heather Douglas has expanded on the well-known argument from inductive risk, thereby launching an influential contemporary critique of the value-free ideal for science. This paper distills Douglas’s critique into four major claims. The first three claims provide a significant challenge to the value-free ideal for science. However, the fourth claim, which delineates her positive proposal to regulate values in science by distinguishing direct and indirect roles for values, is ambiguous between two interpretations, and both (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  7.  73
    The promise and perils of industry‐funded science.Bennett Holman & Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (11).
    Private companies provide by far the most funding for scientific research and development. Nevertheless, relatively little attention has been paid to the dynamics of industry‐funded research by philosophers of science. This paper addresses this gap by providing an overview of the major strengths and weaknesses of industry research funding, together with the existing recommendations for addressing the weaknesses. It is designed to provide a starting point for future philosophical work that explores the features of industry‐funded research, avenues for addressing concerns, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  8. Direct and Indirect Roles for Values in Science.Kevin C. Elliott - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (2):303-324.
    Although many philosophers have employed the distinction between “direct” and “indirect” roles for values in science, I argue that it merits further clarification. The distinction can be formulated in several ways: as a logical point, as a distinction between epistemic attitudes, or as a clarification of different consequences associated with accepting scientific claims. Moreover, it can serve either as part of a normative ideal or as a tool for policing how values influence science. While various formulations of the distinction may (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  9.  30
    Current Controversies in Values and Science.Kevin Christopher Elliott & Daniel Steel (eds.) - 2016 - New York: Routledge.
    _Current Controversies in Values and Science_ asks ten philosophers to debate five questions that are driving contemporary work in this important area of philosophy of science. The book is perfect for the advanced student, building up her knowledge of the foundations of the field while also engaging its most cutting-edge questions. Introductions and annotated bibliographies for each debate, preliminary descriptions of each chapter, study questions, and a supplemental guide to further controversies involving values in science help provide clearer and richer (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  10. Values in Science.Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    This Element introduces the philosophical literature on values in science by examining four questions: How do values influence science? Should we actively incorporate values in science? How can we manage values in science responsibly? What are some next steps for those who want to help promote responsible roles for values in science? It explores arguments for and against the “value-free ideal” for science and concludes that it should be rejected. Nonetheless, this does not mean that value influences are always acceptable. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. How values in scientific discovery and pursuit Alter theory appraisal.Kevin C. Elliott & Daniel J. McKaughan - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):598-611.
    Philosophers of science readily acknowledge that nonepistemic values influence the discovery and pursuit of scientific theories, but many tend to regard these influences as epistemically uninteresting. The present paper challenges this position by identifying three avenues through which nonepistemic values associated with discovery and pursuit in contemporary pollution research influence theory appraisal: (1) by guiding the choice of questions and research projects, (2) by altering experimental design, and (3) by affecting the creation and further investigation of theories or hypotheses. This (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  12. Cognitive Attitudes and Values in Science.Kevin C. Elliott & David Willmes - unknown - Philosophy of Science (5):807-817.
    We argue that the analysis of cognitive attitudes should play a central role in developing more sophisticated accounts of the proper roles for values in science. First, we show that the major recent efforts to delineate appropriate roles for values in science would be strengthened by making clearer distinctions among cognitive attitudes. Next, we turn to a specific example and argue that a more careful account of the distinction between the attitudes of belief and acceptance can contribute to a better (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  13.  81
    Varieties of Exploratory Experimentation in Nanotoxicology.Kevin Elliott - 2007 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 29 (3):313 - 336.
    There has been relatively little effort to provide a systematic overview of different forms of exploratory experimentation (EE). The present paper examines the growing subdiscipline of nanotoxicology and suggests that it illustrates at least four ways that researchers can engage in EE: searching for regularities; developing new techniques, simulation models, and instrumentation; collecting and analyzing large swaths of data using new experimental strategies (e.g., computer-based simulation and "high-throughput" instrumentation); and structuring an entire disciplinary field around exploratory research agendas. In order (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  14. Introduction: Cognitive attitudes and values in science.Daniel J. McKaughan & Kevin C. Elliott - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 53:57-61.
  15.  24
    Science, Values, and the New Demarcation Problem.David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott - 2023 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 54 (2):259-286.
    In recent years, many philosophers of science have rejected the “value-free ideal” for science, arguing that non-epistemic values have a legitimate role to play in scientific inquiry. However, this philosophical position raises the question of how to distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate influences of values in science. In this paper, we argue that those seeking to address this “new” demarcation problem can benefit by drawing lessons from the “old” demarcation problem, in which philosophers tried to find a way of distinguishing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  66
    Value-entanglement and the integrity of scientific research.David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 75:1-11.
  17. A Tapestry of Values: Response to My Critics.Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (11).
    This response addresses the excellent responses to my book provided by Heather Douglas, Janet Kourany, and Matt Brown. First, I provide some comments and clarifications concerning a few of the highlights from their essays. Second, in response to the worries of my critics, I provide more detail than I was able to provide in my book regarding my three conditions for incorporating values in science. Third, I identify some of the most promising avenues for further research that flow out of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  70
    From genetic to genomic regulation: iterativity in microRNA research.Maureen A. O’Malley, Kevin C. Elliott & Richard M. Burian - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):407-417.
    The discovery and ongoing investigation of microRNAs suggest important conceptual and methodological lessons for philosophers and historians of biology. This paper provides an account of miRNA research and the shift from viewing these tiny regulatory entities as minor curiosities to seeing them as major players in the post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Conceptually, the study of miRNAs is part of a broader change in understandings of genetic regulation, in which simple switch-like mechanisms were reinterpreted as aspects of complex cellular and genome-wide (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  19. Epistemic and methodological iteration in scientific research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):376-382.
    A number of scholars have recently drawn attention to the importance of iteration in scientific research. This paper builds on these previous discussions by drawing a distinction between epistemic and methodological forms of iteration and by clarifying the relationships between them. As defined here, epistemic iteration involves progressive alterations to scientific knowledge claims, whereas methodological iteration refers to an interplay between different modes of research practice. While distinct, these two forms of iteration are related in important ways. Contemporary research on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  20.  21
    Selective Ignorance and Agricultural Research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (3):328-350.
    Scholars working in science and technology studies have recently argued that we could learn much about the nature of scientific knowledge by paying closer attention to scientific ignorance. Building on the work of Robert Proctor, this article shows how ignorance can stem from a wide range of selective research choices that incline researchers toward partial, limited understandings of complex phenomena. A recent report produced by the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development serves as the article’s central (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  21.  9
    A Framework for Analyzing Broadly Engaged Philosophy of Science.Kathryn S. Plaisance & Kevin C. Elliott - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (4):594-615.
    Philosophers of science are increasingly interested in engaging with scientific communities, policy makers, and members of the public; however, the nature of this engagement has not been systematically examined. Instead of delineating a specific kind of engaged philosophy of science, as previous accounts have done, this article draws on literature from outside the discipline to develop a framework for analyzing different forms of broadly engaged philosophy of science according to two key dimensions: social interaction and epistemic integration. Clarifying the many (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  27
    An Institutional Duty to Vote: Applying Role Morality in Representative Democracy.Kevin J. Elliott - forthcoming - Political Theory.
    Is voting a duty of democratic citizenship? This article advances a new argument for the existence of a duty to vote. It argues that every normative account of electoral representation requires universal turnout to function in line with its own internal normative logic. This generates a special obligation for citizens to vote in electoral representative contexts as a function of the role morality of democratic citizenship. Because voting uniquely authorizes office holding in representative democracies, and because universal turnout contributes powerfully (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  24
    Science as Experience: A Deweyan Model of Science Communication.Megan K. Halpern & Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - Perspectives on Science 30 (4):621-656.
    The field of science communication is plagued by challenges. Communicators face the difficulty of responding to unjustified public skepticism over issues like climate change and COVID-19 while also acknowledging the fallibility and limitations of scientific knowledge. Our goal in this paper is to suggest a new model for science communication that can help foster more productive, respectful relationships among all those involved in science communication. Inspired by the pragmatist philosophy of John Dewey, we develop an experience model, according to which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  23
    Non-epistemic values and scientific assessment: an adequacy-for-purpose view.Greg Lusk & Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (2):1-22.
    The literature on values in science struggles with questions about how to describe and manage the role of values in scientific research. We argue that progress can be made by shifting this literature’s current emphasis. Rather than arguing about how non-epistemic values can or should figure into scientific assessment, we suggest analyzing how scientific assessment can accommodate non-epistemic values. For scientific assessment to do so, it arguably needs to incorporate goals that have been traditionally characterized as non-epistemic. Building on this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25.  53
    Financial Conflicts of Interest and Criteria for Research Credibility.Kevin C. Elliott - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S5):917-937.
    The potential for financial conflicts of interest (COIs) to damage the credibility of scientific research has become a significant social concern, especially in the wake of high-profile incidents involving the pharmaceutical, tobacco, fossil-fuel, and chemical industries. Scientists and policy makers have debated whether the presence of financial COIs should count as a reason for treating research with suspicion or whether research should instead be evaluated solely based on its scientific quality. This paper examines a recent proposal to develop criteria for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26. Taking Financial Relationships into Account When Assessing Research.David Resnik & Kevin Elliott - 2013 - Accountability in Research: Policies and Quality Assurance 20 (3):184-205.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  27.  20
    Backtracking and the Ethics of Framing: Lessons from Voles and Vasopressin.Daniel McKaughan & Kevin Elliott - 2012 - Science 338 (6112):341-344.
    When communicating scientific information, experts often face difficult choices about how to promote public understanding while also maintaining an appropriate level of objectivity. We argue that one way for scientists and others involved in communicating scientific information to alleviate these tensions is to pay closer attention to the major frames employed in the contexts in which they work. By doing so, they can ideally employ useful frames while also enabling the recipients of information to “backtrack” to relatively uncontroversial facts and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28.  42
    Standardized Study Designs, Value Judgments, and Financial Conflicts of Interest in Research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (5):529-551.
    . The potential for financial conflicts of interest to influence scientific research has become a significant concern. Some commentators have suggested that the development of standardized study protocols could help to alleviate these problems. This paper identifies two problems with this solution: scientific research incorporates numerous methodological judgments that cannot be constrained by standardized protocols; and standardization can hide significant value judgments. These problems arise because of four weaknesses of standardized guidelines: incompleteness, limited applicability, selective ignorance, and ossification. Therefore, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29. An ethics of expertise based on informed consent.Kevin C. Elliott - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  30.  33
    The value-ladenness of transparency in science: Lessons from Lyme disease.Kevin C. Elliott - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88 (C):1-9.
  31.  38
    Précis of A Tapestry of Values: An Introduction to Values in Science.Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10.
  32.  16
    Teaching and learning guide for: The promise and perils of industry‐funded research.Bennett Holman & Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (11):e12549.
    Private companies provide by far the most funding for scientific research and development. Nevertheless, relatively little attention has been paid to the dynamics of industry‐funded research by philosophers of science. This paper addresses this gap by providing an overview of the major strengths and weaknesses of industry research funding, together with the existing recommendations for addressing the weaknesses. It is designed to provide a starting point for future philosophical work that explores the features of industry‐funded research, avenues for addressing concerns, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  43
    Error as means to discovery.Kevin Elliott - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (2):174-197.
    This paper argues, first, that recent studies of experimentation, most notably by Deborah Mayo, provide the conceptual resources to describe scientific discovery's early stages as error-probing processes. Second, it shows that this description yields greater understanding of those early stages, including the challenges that they pose, the research strategies associated with them, and their influence on the rest of the discovery process. Throughout, the paper examines the phenomenon of "chemical hormesis" (i.e., anomalous low-dose effects from toxic chemicals) as a case (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  34.  33
    Addressing the Reproducibility Crisis: A Response to Hudson.Heather Douglas & Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 53 (2):201-209.
    In this response to Robert Hudson’s article, “Should We Strive to Make Science Bias-Free? A Philosophical Assessment of the Reproducibility Crisis,” we identify three ways in which he misrepresents our work: he conflates value-ladenness with bias; he describes our view as one in which values are the same as evidential factors; and he creates a false dichotomy between two ways that values could be considered in science for policy. We share Hudson’s concerns about promoting scientific reproducibility and reducing bias in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Geoengineering and the Precautionary Principle.Kevin Elliott - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):237-253.
    As it becomes more and more doubtful that the international community will take adequate steps to mitigate climate change, interest has grown in the possibility of engineering earth’s climate to prevent catastrophic levels of warming. Unfortunately, geoengineering schemes have the potential to create grave, unintended consequences. This paper explores the extent to which the precautionary principle (PP), which was developed as a guideline for responding to uncertainty in the policy sphere, can provide guidance for responding to the potential benefits and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  79
    The ethical significance of language in the environmental sciences: Case studies from pollution research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):157 – 173.
    This paper examines how ethically significant assumptions and values are embedded not only in environmental policies but also in the language of the environmental sciences. It shows, based on three case studies associated with contemporary pollution research, how the choice of scientific categories and terms can have at least four ethically significant effects: influencing the future course of scientific research; altering public awareness or attention to environmental phenomena; affecting the attitudes or behavior of key decision makers; and changing the burdens (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37.  21
    Addressing Industry-Funded Research with Criteria for Objectivity.Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):857-868.
    In recent years, industry-funded research has come under fire because of concerns that it can be biased in favor of the funders. This article suggests that efforts by philosophers of science to analyze the concept of objectivity can provide important lessons for those seeking to evaluate and improve industry-funded research. It identifies three particularly relevant criteria for objectivity: transparency, reproducibility, and effective criticism. On closer examination, the criteria of transparency and reproducibility turn out to have significant limitations in this context, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  2
    Navigating dissent by managing value judgments: the case of Lyme disease.Kevin C. Elliott - 2023 - Synthese 202 (5):1-21.
    Recent philosophical literature has highlighted the complexities of handling dissent in science. On one hand, scientific dissent can be very harmful, as when “merchants of doubt” strategically appeal to dissent in order to undermine important environmental and public-health initiatives. On the other hand, scientific dissent can also be beneficial when it helps to promote scientific objectivity, progress, and public engagement. Some authors have responded to this tension by suggesting criteria for distinguishing normatively appropriate and inappropriate dissent, while other authors have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  59
    Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments for Environmental Protection.Kevin C. Elliott - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):243-260.
    Environmental ethicists have devoted considerable attention to discussing whether anthropocentric or nonanthropocentric arguments provide more appropriate means for defending environmental protection. This paper argues that philosophers, scientists, and policy makers should pay more attention to a particular type of anthropocentric argument. These anthropocentric indirect arguments defend actions or policies that benefit the environment, but they justify the policies based on beneficial effects on humans that are not caused by their environmental benefits. AIAs appear to have numerous appealing characteristics, and their (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  12
    The Kaleidoscope of Citizen ScienceCommentary.Kevin C. Elliott - 2019 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 9 (1):47-52.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  19
    Roles for Socially Engaged Philosophy of Science in Environmental Policy.Kevin C. Elliott - unknown - In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 767-778.
    In recent years, philosophers of science have taken renewed interest in pursuing scholarship that is “socially engaged.” As a result, this scholarship has become increasingly relevant to public policy. In order to illustrate the ways in which the philosophy of science can inform public policy, this chapter focuses specifically on environmental research and policy. It shows how philosophy can assist with environmental policy making in three ways: clarifying the roles of values in policy-relevant science; addressing scientific dissent, especially in response (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  26
    Bisphenol A and Risk Management Ethics.David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (3):182-189.
    It is widely recognized that endocrine disrupting compounds, such as Bisphenol A, pose challenges for traditional paradigms in toxicology, insofar as these substances appear to have a wider range of low-dose effects than previously recognized. These compounds also pose challenges for ethics and policymaking. When a chemical does not have significant low-dose effects, regulators can allow it to be introduced into commerce or the environment, provided that procedures and rules are in place to keep exposures below an acceptable level. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  40
    Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles, Energy Policy, and the Ethics of Expertise.Kevin C. Elliott - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):376-393.
    Relatively few thinkers have attempted to develop a systematic ‘ethics of expertise’ (EOE) that can guide scientists and other technical experts in providing information to the public. This paper argues that the prima facie duty to disseminate information in a manner that does not damage the self-determination of decision makers could fruitfully serve as one of the core principles of an EOE. Moreover, this duty can be fleshed out in promising ways by drawing on the concept of informed consent, which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44.  41
    Conceptual clarification and policy-related science: The case of chemical hormesis.Kevin Elliott - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (4):346-366.
    : This paper examines the epistemological warrant for a toxicological phenomenon known as chemical hormesis. First, it argues that conceptual confusion contributes significantly to current disagreements about the status of chemical hormesis as a biological hypothesis. Second, it analyzes seven distinct concepts of chemical hormesis, arguing that none are completely satisfactory. Finally, it suggests three ramifications of this analysis for ongoing debates about the epistemological status of chemical hormesis. This serves as a case study supporting the value of philosophical methodologies (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. Mitigating Conflicts of Interest in Chemical Safety Testing.David Volz & Kevin Elliott - 2012 - Environmental Science and Technology 46 (15):7937-8.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46.  21
    The ethics of infection control: philosophical frameworks.Charles S. Bryan, Theresa J. Call & Kevin C. Elliott - 2007 - Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 28 (9):1077-1084.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  36
    Distinguishing Risk and Uncertainty in Risk Assessments of Emerging Technologies.Kevin C. Elliott & Michael Dickson - unknown
    Economist Frank Knight drew a distinction between decisions under risk and decisions under uncertainty. Despite the significance of this distinction for decision theory, we argue that there has been inadequate attention to the difficulties involved in classifying decision situations into these categories. Using the risk assessment of carbon nanotubes as an example, we show that it is often unclear whether there is adequate information to classify a decision situation as being under risk as opposed to uncertainty. We conclude by providing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  52
    Norton’s Conception of Sustainability.Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):3-22.
    In his new book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, Bryan G. Norton proposes an account of sustainability grounded in the deliberation of local communities as part of an adaptive management process. One can distinguish two different ways of justifying his account—resulting in “political” and “metaphysical” conceptions of sustainability—in much the same way that John Rawls famously distinguishes between political and metaphysical conceptions of justice. Whereas the metaphysical conception of sustainability depends on principles that are specific to American pragmatist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  29
    Against Democracy.Kevin J. Elliott - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (S2):94-97.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  44
    Making Attentive Citizens: The Ethics of Democratic Engagement, Political Equality, and Social Justice.Kevin J. Elliott - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (1):73-91.
    Much discussion of the ethics of participation focuses on electoral participation and whether citizens are obligated or can be coerced to vote. Yet these debates have ignored that citizens must first pay attention to politics and make up their minds about where they stand before they can engage in any form of participation. This article considers the importance for liberal democracy of citizens paying attention to politics, or attentive citizenship. It argues that the democratic state has an obligation to cultivate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 83