13 found
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  1.  8
    Inscribing the Egalitarian Event: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of Iterability.Kevin Inston - 2017 - Constellations 24 (1):15-26.
  2.  48
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Ernesto Laclau and the Somewhat Particular Universal.Kevin Inston - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):555-587.
    Rousseau's general will is mostly interpreted as promoting social unity at the expense of plurality. Conversely, this article argues that the general will depends on, and preserves, plurality for its formation and legitimacy. The general and the particular are not fixed opposites, for Rousseau, but are interdependent and contextually defined. The Rousseauian universal anticipates Laclau's notion of universality. The absence of any natural foundations for society deprives the universal of any pre-given identity. Likewise, the Laclauian universal names the lack of (...)
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  3.  5
    Improper Communities in the Work of Roberto Esposito and Jacques Rancière.Kevin Inston - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-21.
    Recent theories of community aim to think the term beyond its definition as the ownership of shared identity, language, culture or territory. For Esposito, to reduce community to a property whose possession distinguishes members from non-members undermines the commonality the term implies. The common opposes what is proper or one’s own; it belongs to everyone and anyone. Rather than securing identity and belonging, community, defined by its impropriety, disrupts them so that we are in common. While his work successfully illustrates (...)
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  4.  13
    Introduction.Stefano Bellin, Kevin Inston & Florian Mussgnug - 2019 - Paragraph 42 (1):1-5.
    This article analyses the concept of the human in Primo Levi's works, as well as his use of the animal as way of characterizing the nonhuman element inside the human. To disclose the implicit assum...
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  5.  13
    The Human–Animal Relation in Rousseau's Discourse on Inequality.Kevin Inston - 2019 - Paragraph 42 (1):37-53.
    The Discourse on Inequality disputes the human–animal hierarchy in its denunciation of social inequality as unnatural. Stripping away social artifice, it reveals a deep physical continuity between...
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  6.  14
    Chantal Mouffe: Hegemony, Radical Democracy and the Political. [REVIEW]Kevin Inston - 2018 - The European Legacy 24 (2):238-240.
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  7.  38
    Representing the Unrepresentable: Rousseau's Legislator and the Impossible Object of the People.Kevin Inston - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):393-413.
    Rousseau's paradox of how a multitude wills itself into the status of a sovereign people, by deciding to join the contract before existing as a people, with a general will to make that decision, presupposes the absence of any ultimate social grounds and the contingency of identities and structures. These presuppositions make Rousseau an unacknowledged precursor of Laclau's post-structuralist politics, refuting the view that Rousseau's politics seeks a totally transparent and harmonious state beyond the questioning and ambiguity defining the political. (...)
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  8.  3
    Improper Communities in the Work of Roberto Esposito and Jacques Rancière.Kevin Inston - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-21.
    Recent theories of community aim to think the term beyond its definition as the ownership of shared identity, language, culture or territory. For Esposito, to reduce community to a property whose possession distinguishes members from non-members undermines the commonality the term implies. The common opposes what is proper or one’s own; it belongs to everyone and anyone. Rather than securing identity and belonging, community, defined by its impropriety, disrupts them so that we are in common. While his work successfully illustrates (...)
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  9.  29
    Finite Community: Reading Jean-Jacques Rousseau with Jean-Luc Nancy.Kevin Inston - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (2):184-204.
    Jean-Luc Nancy identifies Rousseau as the first to conceive community as a lost state of immediacy and transparency. Rousseau’s conception has allegedly shaped the western ideal of an immanent community. Nancy deconstructs that ideal, arguing that immanence would suppress community; its oneness would block the being-with which enables our ontological being-in-common. This article argues that Rousseau never posits a lost community but actually explores, like Nancy, the political closure of immanence. Man’s distinguishing trait of perfectibility, which renders him finite, always (...)
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  10.  4
    General Will in Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Kevin Inston - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (4):492-494.
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  11.  35
    Rousseau and Radical Democracy.Kevin Inston - 2010 - Continuum.
    The negativity of nature -- Perfectible man as the subject of lack -- Constructing political identities -- The ethics of democracy -- Rethinking the universal -- Constructing the general will -- The democratic paradox: the legislator -- Rousseau's radical democracy.
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  12.  32
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “Post-Marxist” Critique of Alienation: A Re-Reading Through Jacques Lacan and Slavoj Žižek.Kevin Inston - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (3):349-367.
  13.  14
    Lyotard’s Politics of Difference and Equivalence.Kevin Inston - 2002 - Philosophy Today 46 (4):356-372.