9 found
Order:
  1.  22
    Is Emotional Magnitude Spatialized? A Further Investigation.Kevin J. Holmes, Candelaria Alcat & Stella F. Lourenco - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (4):e12727.
    Accumulating evidence suggests that different magnitudes (e.g., number, size, and duration) are spatialized in the mind according to a common left–right metric, consistent with a generalized system for representing magnitude. A previous study conducted by two of us (Holmes & Lourenco, ) provided evidence that this metric extends to the processing of emotional magnitude, or the intensity of emotion expressed in faces. Recently, however, Pitt and Casasanto () showed that the earlier effects may have been driven by a left–right mapping (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  14
    Mentor as Sculptor, Makeover Artist, Coach, or CEO: Evaluating Contrasting Models for Mentoring Undergraduates' Mesearch Toward Publishable Research.Kevin J. Holmes & Tomi-Ann Roberts - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  3.  26
    How and when does syntax perpetuate stereotypes? Probing the framing effects of subject-complement statements of equality.Kevin J. Holmes, Evan M. Doherty & Stephen J. Flusberg - 2022 - Thinking and Reasoning 28 (2):226-260.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  3
    Even Abstract Motion Influences the Understanding of Time.Teenie Matlock, Kevin J. Holmes, Mahesh Srinivasan & Michael Ramscar - 2011 - Metaphor and Symbol 26 (4):260-271.
    Many metaphor theorists argue that our mental experience of time is grounded in our understanding of space, including motion through space. Results from recent experiments – in which people think about motion, which in turn influences their thinking about time – support this position. Still, many questions remain about the nature of the metaphorical connection between time and space. Can the mere suggestion of motion influence how people reason about time, and if so, when and how? Three experiments investigated how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Simulation from schematics: dorsal stream processing and the perception of implied motion.Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2704--2709.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  43
    Right idea, wrong magnitude system.Stella F. Lourenco, Lauren S. Aulet, Vladislav Ayzenberg, Chi-Ngai Cheung & Kevin J. Holmes - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  20
    Even simple framing effects are rational.Stephen J. Flusberg, Paul H. Thibodeau & Kevin J. Holmes - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e228.
    Bermúdez persuasively argues that framing effects are not as irrational as commonly supposed. In focusing on the reasoning of individual decision-makers in complex situations, however, he neglects the crucial role of the social-communicative context for eliciting certain framing effects. We contend that many framing effects are best explained in terms of basic, rational principles of discourse processing and pragmatic reasoning.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  21
    Compound Words Reflect Cross‐Culturally Shared Bodily Metaphors.Kevin J. Holmes, Stephen J. Flusberg & Paul H. Thibodeau - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3071-3082.
    Parts of the body are often embedded in the structure of compound words, such as heartbreak and brainchild. We explored the relationships between the semantics of compounds and their constituent body parts, asking whether these relationships are largely arbitrary or instead reflect deeper metaphorical mappings shared across languages and cultures. In three studies, we found that U.S. English speakers associated the English translation equivalents of Chinese compounds with their constituent body parts at rates well above chance, even for compounds with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  37
    Spatial language as a window on representations of three-dimensional space.Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):550-551.
    Recent research investigating the language–thought interface in the spatial domain points to representations of the horizontal and vertical dimensions that closely resemble those posited by Jeffery et al. However, the findings suggest that such representations, rather than being tied to navigation, may instead reflect more general properties of the perception of space.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark