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Kevin Kinghorn [16]Kevin Paul Kinghorn [2]
  1. Spiritual blindness, self-deception and morally culpable nonbelief.Kevin Kinghorn - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (4):527–545.
    While we may not be able simply to choose what we believe, there is still scope for culpability for what we come to belief. I explore here the distinction between culpable and non-culpable theistic unbelief, investigating the process of self-deception to which we can voluntarily contribute in cases where we do become culpable for failing to believe something.
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  2. Multiple Universes and the Surprisingness of Life: A Response to Roger White's Conclusions on Design Arguments.Kevin Kinghorn - 2005 - Philosophia Christi 7 (2):483 - 490.
    In his essay, "Fine-Tuning and Multiple Universes", Roger White examines the extent to which a multiple-universe hypothesis lessens the ’surprisingness’ that our universe should be life-sustaining. White offers two main conclusions. His first conclusion -- that the existence of our world is not itself evidence for the existence of multiple universes -- is sound. However, his second conclusion is that, on the hypothesis that multiple universes exist, the further hypothesis of an intelligent designer does not lesson the surprisingness that our (...)
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  3.  20
    A Case of Insincerity: What Does it Mean to Deceive Someone?Kevin Kinghorn - 2012 - In Philip Tallon & David Baggett (eds.), The Philosophy of Sherlock Holmes. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 37-48.
    In unpacking the nature of deception, we'll want to ask what conditions would need to be met in order rightly to conclude that an act of deception has taken place. The literary stories about Sherlock Holmes provide a large pool of examples of misdirection, whereby Holmes is able to stay one step ahead of his adversaries. These examples are used to show the inadequacy of a number of purported definitions of deception. I then settle on one definition that does seem (...)
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  4.  15
    The Nature of Desert Claims: Rethinking What It Means to Get One's Due.Kevin Paul Kinghorn - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Our everyday conversations reveal the widespread assumption that positive and negative treatment of others can be justified on the grounds that “they deserve it.” But what is it exactly to 'deserve' something? This book offers an exploration into how we came to have this concept, along with an explanation why people feel so strongly that redress is needed when outcomes are undeserved. The book probes for that core concern which is common to the range of everyday desert claims people make. (...)
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  5.  11
    What motivates an early morning runner?Kevin Kinghorn - 2007 - In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell.
    The varying motivations of early morning runners becomes a useful way of distinguishing a 'decision' from an 'intentional action'. Runners may differ greatly on the number of actual decisions that are made in the course of a run--even while they perform roughly the same number of intentional actions. In showing how this is so, it also becomes clear why a single action can have multiple descriptions.
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  6.  17
    Heaven. [REVIEW]Kevin Kinghorn - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):120-124.
  7.  7
    Heaven. [REVIEW]Kevin Kinghorn - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (1):120-124.
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  8.  7
    Michael Bergmann and Jeffrey Brower, eds. Reason & Faith: Themes from Richard Swinburne[REVIEW]Kevin Kinghorn - 2018 - Journal of Analytic Theology 6:748-753.
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