11 found
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  1.  13
    Exploring Understanding of “Understanding”: The Paradigm Case of Biobank Consent Comprehension.Laura M. Beskow & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):6-18.
    Data documenting poor understanding among research participants and real-time efforts to assess comprehension in large-scale studies are focusing new attention on informed consent comprehension. Within the context of biobanking consent, we previously convened a multidisciplinary panel to reach consensus about what information must be understood for a prospective participant’s consent to be considered valid. Subsequently, we presented them with data from another study showing that many U.S. adults would fail to comprehend the information the panel had deemed essential. When asked (...)
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  2.  47
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
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  3.  28
    Patients' Views Concerning Research on Medical Practices: Implications for Consent.Kevin P. Weinfurt, Juli M. Bollinger, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Travis J. Crayton, Rachel J. Topazian, Nancy E. Kass, Laura M. Beskow & Jeremy Sugarman - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (2):76-91.
  4.  6
    Commentary: Dangerous Disconnections.Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):413-414.
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  5.  9
    Propositions and Pragmatics.Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):18-20.
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  6.  4
    A Model to Be Emulated.Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):18-20.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 18-20.
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  7.  27
    Using Cognitive Interviews to Enhance Measurement in Empirical Bioethics: Developing a Measure of the Preventive Misconception in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials.Jeremy Sugarman, Damon M. Seils, J. Kemp Watson-Ormond & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (1):17-23.
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  8.  23
    Disclosing Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Research: Views of Institutional Review Boards, Conflict of Interest Committees, and Investigators.Kevin P. Weinfurt, Joëlle Y. Friedman, Michaela A. Dinan, Jennifer S. Allsbrook, Mark A. Hall, Jatinder K. Dhillon & Jeremy Sugarman - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):581-591.
    Strategies for disclosing investigators' financial interests to potential research participants have been adopted by many research institutions. However, little is known about how decisions are made regarding disclosures of financial interests to potential research participants, including what is disclosed and the rationale for making these determinations. We sought to understand the attitudes, beliefs, and practices of institutional review board chairs, conflict of interest committee chairs, and investigators regarding disclosure of financial interests to potential research participants. Several themes emerged, including general (...)
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  9.  12
    Preventive Misconception and Risk Behaviors in a Multinational HIV Prevention Trial.Jeremy Sugarman, Li Lin, Jared M. Baeten, Thesla Palanee-Phillips, Elizabeth R. Brown, Flavia Matovu Kiweewa, Nyaradzo M. Mgodi, Gonasagrie Nair, Samantha Siva, Damon M. Seils & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 10 (2):79-87.
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  10.  15
    Disclosing Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Research: Views of Institutional Review Boards, Conflict of Interest Committees, and Investigators.Kevin P. Weinfurt, Joëlle Y. Friedman, Michaela A. Dinan, Jennifer S. Allsbrook, Mark A. Hall, Jatinder K. Dhillon & Jeremy Sugarman - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):581-591.
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  11.  4
    Some Uncertainty Regarding Uncertainty Reduction.Kevin P. Weinfurt - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):193-199.
    Tryon has proposed the definition of a scientific explanation as an explanation that reduces uncertainty, and relates this to the reduction of statistical variance. Lamiell criticizes Tryon on several grounds, arguing that the reduction of criterion variance does not yield knowledge of the sort Tryon desires. This paper comments on Tryon's proposal, including his reply to Lamiell's criticisms. It is concluded that explanation as uncertainty reduction is a simple recapitulation of the Hempelian model of explanation at the theoretical level, and (...)
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