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  1.  28
    His Own Synthesis: Corn, Edgar Anderson, and Evolutionary Theory in the 1940s. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):293 - 320.
    Tracing the contributions of Edgar Anderson (1897-1969) of the Missouri Botanical Garden to the important discussions in evolutionary biology in the 1940s, this paper argues that Anderson turned to corn research rather than play a more prominent role in what is now known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. His biosystematic studies of Iris and Tradescantia in the 1930s reflected such Synthesis concerns as the species question and population thinking. He shared the 1941 Jesup Lectures with Ernst Mayr. But rather than preparing (...)
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  2.  35
    Systematics and the Origin of Species From the Viewpoint of a Botanist: Edgar Anderson Prepares the 1941 Jesup Lectures with Ernst Mayr. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (1):73-101.
    The correspondence between Edgar Anderson and Ernst Mayr leading into their 1941 Jesup Lectures on “Systematics and the Origin of Species” addressed population thinking, the nature of species, the relationship of microevolution to macroevolution, and the evolutionary dynamics of plants and animals, all central issues in what came to be known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. On some points, they found ready agreement; for others they forged only a short term consensus. They brought two different working styles to this project reflecting (...)
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  3.  11
    “Bringing Taxonomy to the Service of Genetics”: Edgar Anderson and Introgressive Hybridization.Kim Kleinman - 2016 - Journal of the History of Biology 49 (4):603-624.
    In introgressive hybridization (the repeated backcrossing of hybrids with parental populations), Edgar Anderson found a source for variation upon which natural selection could work. In his 1953 review article “Introgressive Hybridization,” he asserted that he was “bringing taxonomy to the service of genetics” whereas distinguished colleagues such as Theodosius Dobzhansky and Ernst Mayr did the precise opposite. His work as a geneticist particularly focused on linkage and recombination and was enriched by collaborations with Missouri Botanical Garden colleagues interested in taxonomy (...)
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  4.  18
    Book Review: Arturo Warman, Corn and Capitalism: How a Botanical Bastard Grew to Global Dominance. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):594-595.
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    Book Review: Arturo Warman, Trans. By Nancy L. Westrate (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 2003), Xiii+ 270 Pp., $49.95, $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):594-595.
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  6.  7
    Eliza Frances Andrews. Journal of a Georgia Woman, 1870–1872. Edited by, S. Kittrell Rushing. Xliv+142 Pp., Frontis., Illus., Bibl., Index. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002. $25. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):737-737.
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  7.  8
    Genera, Evolution, and Botanists in 1940: Edgar Anderson's “Survey of Modern Opinion”.Kim Kleinman - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 67:1-7.
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    Joseph Ewan, 24 October 1909–5 December 1999Nesta Dunn Ewan, 8 November 1908–13 September 2000.Kim Kleinman - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):646-648.
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  9.  34
    Noel Kingsbury, Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2009), Xv + 493 Pp., $35.00. [REVIEW]Kim Kleinman - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):153-154.
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