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Kimball A. Milton [6]Kimball Milton [1]
  1.  73
    The Young Julian Schwinger. I. A New York City Childhood.Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (5):767-786.
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In this first article, Schwinger's childhood, growing-up, and early education are discussed.
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  2.  71
    The Young Julian Schwinger. III. Schwinger Goes to Berkeley.Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (6):931-966.
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger is explored. After a brilliant beginning at Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D., Schwinger went to work with J. Robert Oppenheimer in Berkeley. His stay, work, and interactions with Oppenheimer are discussed.
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  3.  68
    The Young Julian Schwinger. V. Winding Up at the Radiation Lab, Going to Harvard, and Marriage.Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (7):1119-1162.
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In the present article, we discuss Schwinger's winding up his work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory, being offered a tenured professorship at Harvard University, getting married, and settling down into a highly productive teaching and research career.
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  4.  68
    The Young Julian Schwinger. IV. During the Second World War.Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (6):967-1010.
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In the present article, Schwinger's work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory during the Second World War is described.
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  5.  66
    The Young Julian Schwinger. II. Julian Schwinger at Columbia University.Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (5):787-817.
    In this series of articles the life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In this second article in the series, Schwinger's work at Columbia University, up to the completion of his doctorate and a little after, is discussed. Schwinger soon matured into a brilliant theoretical physicist.
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  6. Climbing the Mountain: The Scientific Biography of Julian Schwinger.Jagdish Mehra & Kimball Milton - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Julian Schwinger was one of the leading theoretical physicists of the twentieth century. His contributions are as important, and as pervasive, as those of Richard Feynman, with whom he shared the 1965 Nobel Prize for Physics. Yet, while Feynman is universally recognized as a cultural icon, Schwinger is little known even to many within the physics community. In his youth, Julian Schwinger was a nuclear physicist, turning to classical electrodynamics after World War II. In the years after the war, he (...)
     
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  7.  28
    Direct and Indirect Searches for Low-Mass Magnetic Monopoles.Leonard Gamberg, George R. Kalbfleisch & Kimball A. Milton - 2000 - Foundations of Physics 30 (4):543-565.
    Recently, there has been renewed interest in the search for low-mass magnetic monopoles. At the University of Oklahoma we are performing an experiment (Fermilab E882) using material from the old D0 and CDF detectors to set limits on the existence of Dirac monopoles of masses of the order of 500 GeV. To set such limits, estimates must be made of the production rate of such monopoles at the Tevatron collider, and of the binding strength of any such produced monopoles to (...)
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