16 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Kirsten Martin [14]Kirsten E. Martin [4]
  1.  30
    Ethical Implications and Accountability of Algorithms.Kirsten Martin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):835-850.
    Algorithms silently structure our lives. Algorithms can determine whether someone is hired, promoted, offered a loan, or provided housing as well as determine which political ads and news articles consumers see. Yet, the responsibility for algorithms in these important decisions is not clear. This article identifies whether developers have a responsibility for their algorithms later in use, what those firms are responsible for, and the normative grounding for that responsibility. I conceptualize algorithms as value-laden, rather than neutral, in that algorithms (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  34
    Understanding Privacy Online: Development of a Social Contract Approach to Privacy.Kirsten Martin - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):551-569.
    Recent scholarship in philosophy, law, and information systems suggests that respecting privacy entails understanding the implicit privacy norms about what, why, and to whom information is shared within specific relationships. These social contracts are important to understand if firms are to adequately manage the privacy expectations of stakeholders. This paper explores a social contract approach to developing, acknowledging, and protecting privacy norms within specific contexts. While privacy as a social contract—a mutually beneficial agreement within a community about sharing and using (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  3. Stakeholder Capitalism.R. Edward Freeman, Kirsten Martin & Bidhan Parmar - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):303-314.
    In this article, we will outline the principles of stakeholder capitalism and describe how this view rejects problematic assumptions in the current narratives of capitalism. Traditional narratives of capitalism rely upon the assumptions of competition, limited resources, and a winner-take-all mentality as fundamental to business and economic activity. These approaches leave little room for ethical analysis, have a simplistic view of human beings, and focus on value-capture rather than value-creation. We argue these assumptions about capitalism are inadequate and leave four (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  4.  17
    Public Trust in Business and Its Determinants.Bidhan Parmar, Kirsten Martin & Michael Pirson - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):132-166.
    Public trust in business, defined as the degree to which the public—meaning society at large—trusts business in general, is largely understudied. This article suggests four domains of existing trust research from which scholars of public trust in business can draw. The authors then propose four main hypotheses, which aim to predict the determinants of public trust, and test these hypotheses using a factorial vignette methodology. These results will provide scholars with more direction as this article is, to the authors’ knowledge, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  11
    Trust and the Online Market Maker: A Comment on Etzioni’s Cyber Trust.Kirsten Martin - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):21-24.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Some Problems with Employee Monitoring.Kirsten Martin & R. Edward Freeman - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):353-361.
    Employee monitoring has raised concerns from all areas of society - business organizations, employee interest groups, privacy advocates, civil libertarians, lawyers, professional ethicists, and every combination possible. Each advocate has its own rationale for or against employee monitoring whether it be economic, legal, or ethical. However, no matter what the form of reasoning, seven key arguments emerge from the pool of analysis. These arguments have been used equally from all sides of the debate. The purpose of this paper is to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  7.  39
    The Separation of Technology and Ethics in Business Ethics.Kirsten E. Martin & R. Edward Freeman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):353-364.
    The purpose of this paper is to draw out and make explicit the assumptions made in the treatment of technology within business ethics. Drawing on the work of Freeman (1994, 2000) on the assumed separation between business and ethics, we propose a similar separation exists in the current analysis of technology and ethics. After first identifying and describing the separation thesis assumed in the analysis of technology, we will explore how this assumption manifests itself in the current literature. A different (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  8.  11
    Formation of Stakeholder Trust in Business and the Role of Personal Values.Michael Pirson, Kirsten Martin & Bidhan Parmar - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (1):1-20.
    Declining levels of stakeholder trust in business are of concern to business executives and scholars for legitimacy- and performance-related effects. Research in the area of stakeholder trust in business is nascent; therefore, the trust formation process has been rarely examined at the stakeholder level. Furthermore, the role of personal values as one significant influence in trust formation has been under-researched. In this paper, we develop a contingency model for stakeholder trust formation based on the effects of stakeholder-specific vulnerability and personal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  39
    Assumptions in Decision Making Scholarship: Implications for Business Ethics Research. [REVIEW]Kirsten Martin & Bidhan Parmar - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):289-306.
    While decision making scholarship in management has specifically addressed the objectivist assumptions within the rational choice model, a similar move within business ethics has only begun to occur. Business ethics scholarship remains primarily based on rational choice assumptions. In this article, we examine the managerial decision making literature in order to illustrate equivocality within the rational choice model. We identify four key assumptions in the decision making literature and illustrate how these assumptions affect decision making theory, research, and practice within (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  26
    Diminished or Just Different? A Factorial Vignette Study of Privacy as a Social Contract.Kirsten E. Martin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):519-539.
    A growing body of theory has focused on privacy as being contextually defined, where individuals have highly particularized judgments about the appropriateness of what, why, how, and to whom information flows within a specific context. Such a social contract understanding of privacy could produce more practical guidance for organizations and managers who have employees, users, and future customers all with possibly different conceptions of privacy across contexts. However, this theoretical suggestion, while intuitively appealing, has not been empirically examined. This study (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  54
    Information Technology and Privacy: Conceptual Muddles or Privacy Vacuums? [REVIEW]Kirsten Martin - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):267-284.
    Within a given conversation or information exchange, do privacy expectations change based on the technology used? Firms regularly require users, customers, and employees to shift existing relationships onto new information technology, yet little is known as about how technology impacts established privacy expectations and norms. Coworkers are asked to use new information technology, users of gmail are asked to use GoogleBuzz, patients and doctors are asked to record health records online, etc. Understanding how privacy expectations change, if at all, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  7
    Breaking the Privacy Paradox: The Value of Privacy and Associated Duty of Firms.Kirsten Martin - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):65-96.
    ABSTRACT:The oft-cited privacy paradox is the perceived disconnect between individuals’ stated privacy expectations, as captured in surveys, and consumer market behavior in going online: individuals purport to value privacy yet still disclose information to firms. The goal of this paper is to empirically examine the conceptualization of privacy postdisclosure assumed in the privacy paradox. Contrary to the privacy paradox, the results here suggest consumers retain strong privacy expectations even after disclosing information. Privacy violations are valued akin to security violations in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  10
    Business and the Ethical Implications of Technology: Introduction to the Symposium.Kirsten Martin, Katie Shilton & Jeffery Smith - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):307-317.
    While the ethics of technology is analyzed across disciplines from science and technology studies, engineering, computer science, critical management studies, and law, less attention is paid to the role that firms and managers play in the design, development, and dissemination of technology across communities and within their firm. Although firms play an important role in the development of technology, and make associated value judgments around its use, it remains open how we should understand the contours of what firms owe society (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  18
    Internet Technologies in China: Insights on the Morally Important Influence of Managers.Kirsten E. Martin - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):489-501.
    Within Science and Technology Studies, much work has been accomplished to identify the moral importance of technology in order to clarify the influence of scientists, technologists, and managers. However, similar studies within business ethics have not kept pace with the nuanced and contextualized study of technology within Science and Technology Studies. In this article, I analyze current arguments within business ethics as limiting both the moral importance of technology and the influence of managers. As I argue, such assumptions serve to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  22
    Areas of Privacy in Facebook.Katherina Glac, Dawn R. Elm & Kirsten Martin - 2014 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 33 (2-3):147-176.
    Privacy issues surrounding the use of social media sites have been apparent over the past ten years. Use of such sites, particularly Facebook, has been increasing and recently business organizations have begun using Facebook as a means of connecting with potential customers or clients. This paper presents an empirical study of perceived privacy violations to examine factors that influence the expectations of privacy on Facebook. Results of the study suggest that the more important Facebook is to users, the more likely (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  11
    Regulating Code: Good Governance and Better Regulation in the Information Age, by Ian Brown and Christopher Marsden. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0262018821. [REVIEW]Kirsten Martin - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):624-627.