Results for 'Kirsten Thorpe'

726 found
Order:
  1.  40
    Knowing what a novel word is not: Two-year-olds ‘listen through’ ambiguous adjectives in fluent speech.Kirsten Thorpe & Anne Fernald - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):389-433.
  2.  65
    The Effects of Feature-Label-Order and Their Implications for Symbolic Learning.Michael Ramscar, Daniel Yarlett, Melody Dye, Katie Denny & Kirsten Thorpe - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):909-957.
    Symbols enable people to organize and communicate about the world. However, the ways in which symbolic knowledge is learned and then represented in the mind are poorly understood. We present a formal analysis of symbolic learning—in particular, word learning—in terms of prediction and cue competition, and we consider two possible ways in which symbols might be learned: by learning to predict a label from the features of objects and events in the world, and by learning to predict features from a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  3. Sergeant Thorpe Judge of the Assize for the Northern Circuit, His Charge as It Was Delivered to the Grand-Jury at Yorke Assizes the Twentieth of March, 1648. Clearly Epitomizing the Statutes Belonging to This Nation, Which Concerns the Severall Estates and Conditions of Men. And Do Really Promote the Peace and Plenty of This Common-Wealth.Francis Thorpe, Matthew Walbancke, Richard Best & W. T. - 1649 - Printed by T:W: For Mathew Walbancke, and Richard Best, at Grayes-Inne Gate.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  68
    The Relevance View: Defended and Extended.Kirsten Mann - 2021 - Utilitas 33 (1):101-110.
    The Relevance View, exemplified by Alex Voorhoeve's Aggregate Relevant Claims, has considerable appeal. It accommodates our reluctance to aggregate weak claims in canonical cases like Life for Headaches, while permitting aggregation of claims in a range of other cases. But it has been the target of significant criticism. In an important recent paper, Patrick Tomlin argues that the view suffers from failures of internal logic, violating plausible consistency constraints and generating incoherent combinations of verdicts on cases. And in cases resembling (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  30
    Consequences of Moral Transgressions: How Regulatory Focus Orientation Motivates or Hinders Moral Decoupling.Kirsten Cowan & Atefeh Yazdanparast - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):115-132.
    How can firms mitigate the impact of moral violations on consumer evaluations? This question has pervaded the business ethics literature. Though prior research has identified decoupling as a moral reasoning strategy where consumers separate moral judgments from evaluations, it is unclear what motivates individuals to decouple. It is the objective of this research to explore regulatory focus theory as a motivating factor for moral decoupling. Three experiments are undertaken. Study one demonstrates that with a prevention mindset as opposed to promotion (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  29
    Whether the Theory of Family Resemblances Solves the Problem of Universals.J. W. Thorp - 1972 - Mind 81 (324):567 - 570.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. The Stonehenge bluestones: Discussion. Authors' reply.O. Williams-Thorpe, C. P. Green & J. D. Scourse - 1997 - In Scourse J. D. (ed.), Science and Stonehenge. pp. 315-318.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  67
    Some Problems with Employee Monitoring.Kirsten Martin & R. Edward Freeman - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):353-361.
    Employee monitoring has raised concerns from all areas of society – business organizations, employee interest groups, privacy advocates, civil libertarians, lawyers, professional ethicists, and every combination possible. Each advocate has its own rationale for or against employee monitoring whether it be economic, legal, or ethical. However, no matter what the form of reasoning, seven key arguments emerge from the pool of analysis. These arguments have been used equally from all sides of the debate. The purpose of this paper is to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  9.  28
    Business and the Ethical Implications of Technology: Introduction to the Symposium.Kirsten Martin, Katie Shilton & Jeffery Smith - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):307-317.
    While the ethics of technology is analyzed across disciplines from science and technology studies, engineering, computer science, critical management studies, and law, less attention is paid to the role that firms and managers play in the design, development, and dissemination of technology across communities and within their firm. Although firms play an important role in the development of technology, and make associated value judgments around its use, it remains open how we should understand the contours of what firms owe society (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  10.  34
    Making Death Not Quite as Bad for the One Who Dies.Kirsten Egerstrom - 2021 - In Michael Cholbi & Travis Timmerman (eds.), Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 93-100.
    One popular rival to Epicureanism is deprivationism, which maintains that a person’s death at a given time is bad for her to the extent that, and because, it prevents her from having a longer life that would have been, on the whole, good. Deprivationism has the surprising implication that we can lessen how bad a person’s death is for them by changing the life they would have had if they lived longer (for example, by convincing a person’s favorite author to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. The Claims of Future Persons.Kirsten Meyer - 2018 - Erkenntnis 83 (1):43-59.
    This paper defends a deontological egalitarianism in the ethics of future generations. Concerns about the non-identity problem have been taken as a reason to develop sufficientarian approaches to intergenerational justice. This paper argues for a solution to the non-identity problem that refers to the claims of future persons. In principle, the content of these claims could be spelled out with a sufficientarian and an egalitarian approach. What speaks against sufficientarianism, however, is that the sufficiency threshold, unless it is set very (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  13
    On Kirsten Malmkjær, Translation and creativity London, Routledge, 2020, pp. 140.Kirsten Malmkiær, Defeng Li & Marco Josep Borrillo - 2022 - Studi di Estetica 22.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  47
    Artificial Intelligence and Medical Humanities.Kirsten Ostherr - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):211-232.
    The use of artificial intelligence in healthcare has led to debates about the role of human clinicians in the increasingly technological contexts of medicine. Some researchers have argued that AI will augment the capacities of physicians and increase their availability to provide empathy and other uniquely human forms of care to their patients. The human vulnerabilities experienced in the healthcare context raise the stakes of new technologies such as AI, and the human dimensions of AI in healthcare have particular significance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Closure Scepticism and The Vat Argument.Joshua Rowan Thorpe - 2017 - Mind 127 (507):667-690.
    If it works, I can use Putnam’s vat argument to show that I have not always been a brain-in-a-vat. It is widely thought that the vat argument is of no use against closure scepticism – that is, scepticism motivated by arguments that appeal to a closure principle. This is because, even if I can use the vat argument to show that I have not always been a BIV, I cannot use it to show that I was not recently envatted, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  35
    Histories of sexology today: Reimagining the boundaries of scientia sexualis.Kirsten Leng & Katie Sutton - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (1):3-9.
    The historiography of sexology is young. It is also expanding at a remarkable pace, both in terms of the volume of publications and, more notably, in terms of its geographical, disciplinary, and intersectional reach. This special issue takes stock of these new directions, while offering new research contributions that expand our understanding of the interdisciplinary and transnational formation of this field from the late 19th through to the mid 20th century. The five articles that make up this special issue stage (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Philosophy at Yeditepe, Special Issue on Method in Philosophy.Lucas Thorpe - 2016
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  21
    Aristotle & Cancer.John Thorp - unknown
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  28
    Aristotle's Use of Categories. An Easing of the Oddness in "Metaphysica" Δ 7.J. W. Thorp - 1974 - Phronesis 19 (3):238 - 256.
  19. New Developments in Archaeological Science.O. Williams-Thorpe & R. S. Thorpe - 1992
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  18
    Stakeholder Friction.Kirsten Martin & Robert Phillips - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):519-531.
    A mainstay of stakeholder management is the belief that firms create value when they invest more time, money, and attention to stakeholders than is necessary for the immediate transaction. This tendency to repeat interactions with the same set of stakeholders fosters what we call stakeholder friction. Stakeholder friction is a term for the collection of social, legal, and economic forces leading firms to prioritize and reinvest in current stakeholders. For many stakeholder scholars, such friction is close to universally beneficial, but (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Ethical Implications and Accountability of Algorithms.Kirsten Martin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):835-850.
    Algorithms silently structure our lives. Algorithms can determine whether someone is hired, promoted, offered a loan, or provided housing as well as determine which political ads and news articles consumers see. Yet, the responsibility for algorithms in these important decisions is not clear. This article identifies whether developers have a responsibility for their algorithms later in use, what those firms are responsible for, and the normative grounding for that responsibility. I conceptualize algorithms as value-laden, rather than neutral, in that algorithms (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  22.  90
    Illegal Downloading, Ethical Concern, and Illegal Behavior.Kirsten Robertson, Lisa McNeill, James Green & Claire Roberts - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):215-227.
    Illegally downloading music through peer-topeer networks has persisted in spite of legal action to deter the behavior. This study examines the individual characteristics of downloaders which could explain why they are not dissuaded by messages that downloading is illegal. We compared downloaders to non-downloaders and examined whether downloaders were characterized by less ethical concern, engagement in illegal behavior, and a propensity toward stealing a CD from a music store under varying levels of risk. We also examined whether downloading or individual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  23. Animal Nature and Human Nature.W. H. Thorpe - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (194):485-487.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  24.  77
    The separation of technology and ethics in business ethics.Kirsten E. Martin & R. Edward Freeman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):353-364.
    The purpose of this paper is to draw out and make explicit the assumptions made in the treatment of technology within business ethics. Drawing on the work of Freeman (1994, 2000) on the assumed separation between business and ethics, we propose a similar separation exists in the current analysis of technology and ethics. After first identifying and describing the separation thesis assumed in the analysis of technology, we will explore how this assumption manifests itself in the current literature. A different (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  25. Is Kant's Realm of Ends a Unum per Se? Aquinas, Suárez, Leibniz and Kant on Composition.Lucas Thorpe - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):461-485.
    Kant and Leibniz are interested in explaining how a number of individuals can come together and form a single unified composite substance. Leibniz does not have a convincing account of how this is possible. In his pre-critical writings and in his later metaphysics lectures, Kant is committed to the claim that the idea of a world is the idea of a real whole, and hence is the idea of a composite substance. This metaphysical idea is taken over into his ethical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  28
    Aristotle on Brutishness.John Thorp - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):673-694.
    RésuméCet article fait valoir que si le bref traitement que consacre Aristote à la thêriotês, dans l'Éthique à Nicomaque,a été généralement négligé par les commentateurs, il mérite en fait d'être étudié de près. Il jette en effet un éclairage sur certains des sujets les plus populates de l”Éthique,la portée de l'éthique, la place du désir dans la vie morale, la distinction entre akrasie et vice, volontaire et involontaire, et il ouvre des pistes intéressantes sur la commensurabilité des évaluations éthiques.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. Kant on the Relationship between Autonomy and Community.Lucas Thorpe - 2011 - In Charlton Payne & Lucas Thorpe (eds.), Kant and the concept of community. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.
    The central idea behind this paper is the claim that Kant's moral idea of a realm of ends is modeled on the category of community examined in his theoretical works, and that understanding Kant's account of the category of community helps us understand certain features of the idea of a realm of ends, and in particular the fact that a member of a realm of ends must be an autonomous agent. For Kant the idea of a community is essentially the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  21
    Spatiality and Agency: A Phenomenology of Containment.Kirsten Jacobson - 2020 - Puncta 3 (2):54-75.
    In this essay, I consider how spatial experience is fundamentally connected to the development and maintenance of “existential healthy” agency. More specifically, I examine how our formation as choosing, active, and self-defining persons is dependent upon the spatially-thick and interpersonally-interwoven “gestures” through which we develop a lived sense of space as supportive and cooperative or hostile and threatening. I conclude from this both that existentially healthy agency is always already a relational capacity, and, more central to my focus here, that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. The realm of ends as a community of spirits: Kant and swedenborg on the kingdom of heaven and the cleansing of the doors of perception.Lucas Thorpe - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):52-75.
    In this paper I examine the genesis of Kant’s conception of a realm of ends, arguing that Kant first started to think of morality in terms of striving to be a member of a realm of ends, understood as an ideal community, in the early 1760s, and that he was influenced in this by his encounter with the Swedish mystic Emanuel Swedenborg. In 1766 Kant published Dreams of a Spirit Seer, a commentary on Swedenborg’s magnum opus, Heavenly Secrets. Most commentators (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  74
    Aristotle on Brutishness.John Thorp - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):673-.
    Aristotle’s treatment of brutishness in the Nicomachean Ethics is very brief: a couple of paragraphs in the first chapter of Book VII, and most of Chapter 5 of the same book, together with some glancing references in Chapter 6. Commentators standardly give these passages short shrift indeed, if they do not ignore them altogether. In antiquity Aspasius commented on the Ethics, but, by great ill luck, his commentary on the first half of Book 7 is lost. A twelfth- or thirteenth-century (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  23
    Value, Values, and Valuation: The Marketization of Charitable Foundation Impact Investing.Kirsten Andersen & Rebecca Tekula - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (4):1033-1052.
    Based on an abductive analytic study, we examine financial and social value incorporation in the multi-valued market of impact investing. This paper draws on interviews with investment professionals in 54 charitable foundations, intermediary and field building organizations in the impact investing market, to compare market objectives with practice, and to determine whether social and financial values are incorporated, thus producing ‘returns’ of both types through market exchange. We find unincorporated valuation is apparent at both the market level and for several (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  20
    Review of Axel Honneth: The Critique of Power: Reflective Stages in a Critical Social Theory[REVIEW]Thomas R. Thorp - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):412-413.
  33. Cast Upon Their Own Resources.Kirsten Drotner - 1999 - In Morag Shiach (ed.), Feminism and cultural studies. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 89.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  47
    Hypothetical Agent-Based Virtue Ethics: Is It Really Better Than its Alternatives?C. L. Thorpe - 2001 - Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (2):155-158.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Jonathan Dancy, Ethics Without Principles Reviewed by.Crystal Thorpe - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (3):163-165.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  11
    Paideia and Universalism.Thomas Thorp - 1998 - Dialogue and Universalism 8 (10):85-96.
    Jaeger's proposal in his 1933 work, Paideia, that classical Greece should be viewed as the origin and the sustaining source of Westem civilization is likely to be viewed today as, at best, quaint or, at worst, pemicious. But I argue that Jaeger's conception of paideia as acculturation or as the formation of character through culture is superior to current views of human development and education. At the same time, Jaeger accounts for the profundity of the classical Greek conception of education (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. A passage to anthropology: between experience and theory.Kirsten Hastrup - 1995 - New York: Routledge.
    The postmodern critique of Objectivism, Realism and Essentialism has somewhat shattered the foundations of anthropology, seriously questioning the legitimacy of studying others. By confronting the critique and turning it into a vital part of the anthropological debate, A Passage To Anthropology provides a rigorous discussion of central theoretical problems in anthropology that will find a readership in the social sciences and the humanities. It makes the case for a renewed and invigorated scholarly anthropology with extensive reference to recent anthropological debates (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  38. A developed nature: A phenomenological account of the experience of home.Kirsten Jacobson - 2009 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):355-373.
    Though “dwelling” is more commonly associated with Heidegger’s philosophy than with that of Merleau-Ponty, “being-at-home” is in fact integral to Merleau-Ponty’s thinking. I consider the notion of home as it relates to Merleau-Ponty’s more familiar notions of the “lived body” and the “level,” and, in particular, I consider how the unique intertwining of activity and passivity that characterizes our being-at-home is essential to our nature as free beings. I argue that while being-at-home is essentially an experience of passivity—i.e., one that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  39.  44
    Contrasting effects of feature-based statistics on the categorisation and basic-level identification of visual objects.Kirsten I. Taylor, Barry J. Devereux, Kadia Acres, Billi Randall & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):363-374.
  40.  21
    Patient involvement and institutional logics: A discussion paper.Kirsten Beedholm & Kirsten Frederiksen - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (2):e12234.
    The research into patient involvement is seldom concerned with the significance of cultural and structural factors. In this discussion paper, we illustrate our considerations on some of the challenges in implementing the ideal of patient involvement by showing how such factors take part in shaping the ways in which the intentions to involve patients are converted to practical interventions. The aim was to contribute to the approach dealing with contextual and structural factors of significance for patient involvement. With the idea (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  79
    The sorites paradox.Dale A. Thorpe - 1984 - Synthese 61 (3):391 - 421.
    A solution to the sorites paradox is obtained by distinguishing three formats of the sorites argument and appraising them in the light of four fundamental considerations: (i) the appropriate notion of truth for the application of vague predicates to their borderline cases, (ii) a certain construal of borderline cases, (iii) a certain freedom of use of vague terms not enjoyed by non-Vague terms and (iv) the revocation of that freedom by deductive contexts.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  23
    Breaking the Privacy Paradox: The Value of Privacy and Associated Duty of Firms.Kirsten Martin - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):65-96.
    ABSTRACT:The oft-cited privacy paradox is the perceived disconnect between individuals’ stated privacy expectations, as captured in surveys, and consumer market behavior in going online: individuals purport to value privacy yet still disclose information to firms. The goal of this paper is to empirically examine the conceptualization of privacy postdisclosure assumed in the privacy paradox. Contrary to the privacy paradox, the results here suggest consumers retain strong privacy expectations even after disclosing information. Privacy violations are valued akin to security violations in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  10
    On Kirsten Malmkjær, Translation and creativity London, Routledge, 2020, pp. 140.Kirsten Malmkjær, Defeng Li & Josep Marco Borillo - 2022 - Studi di Estetica 22.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  13
    A world unglued: simultanagnosia as a spatial restriction of attention.Kirsten A. Dalrymple, Jason J. S. Barton & Alan Kingstone - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  45.  55
    The experience of home and the space of citizenship.Kirsten Jacobson - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):219-245.
    I argue that, although we are inherently intersubjective beings, we are not first or most originally “public” beings. Rather, to become a public being, that is, a citizen—in other words, to act as an independent and self-controlled agent in a community of similarly independent and self-controlled agents and, specifically, to do so in a shared space in the public arena—is something that we can successfully do only by emerging from our familiar, personal territories—our homes. Finding support in texts from philosophy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46.  38
    Visualizing a Mass Murder: The Portraits of Anders Bering Breivik in Danish National Dailies.Kirsten Mogensen - 2013 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 28 (1):64 - 67.
    (2013). Visualizing a Mass Murder: The Portraits of Anders Bering Breivik in Danish National Dailies. Journal of Mass Media Ethics: Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 64-67. doi: 10.1080/08900523.2013.755083.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Concepts of Animal Welfare in Relation to Positions in Animal Ethics.Kirsten Schmidt - 2011 - Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):153-171.
    When animal ethicists deal with welfare they seem to face a dilemma: On the one hand, they recognize the necessity of welfare concepts for their ethical approaches. On the other hand, many animal ethicists do not want to be considered reformist welfarists. Moreover, animal welfare scientists may feel pressed by moral demands for a fundamental change in our attitude towards animals. The analysis of this conflict from the perspective of animal ethics shows that animal welfare science and animal ethics highly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  48.  34
    Are Algorithmic Decisions Legitimate? The Effect of Process and Outcomes on Perceptions of Legitimacy of AI Decisions.Kirsten Martin & Ari Waldman - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 183 (3):653-670.
    Firms use algorithms to make important business decisions. To date, the algorithmic accountability literature has elided a fundamentally empirical question important to business ethics and management: Under what circumstances, if any, are algorithmic decision-making systems considered legitimate? The present study begins to answer this question. Using factorial vignette survey methodology, we explore the impact of decision importance, governance, outcomes, and data inputs on perceptions of the legitimacy of algorithmic decisions made by firms. We find that many of the procedural governance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49.  21
    A Metaanalysis of Perceptual Organization in Schizophrenia, Schizotypy, and Other High-Risk Groups Based on Variants of the Embedded Figures Task.Kirsten R. Panton, David R. Badcock & Johanna C. Badcock - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  50.  59
    Perceiving an exclusive cause of affect prevents misattribution.Kirsten I. Ruys, Henk Aarts, Esther K. Papies, Masanori Oikawa & Haruka Oikawa - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1009-1015.
    Affect misattribution occurs when affective cues color subsequent unrelated evaluations. Research suggests that affect misattribution decreases when one is aware that affective cues are unrelated to the evaluation at hand. We propose that affect misattribution may even occur when one is aware that affective cues are irrelevant, as long as the source of these cues seems ambiguous. When source ambiguity exists, affective cues may freely influence upcoming unrelated evaluations. We examined this using an adapted affect misattribution procedure where pleasant and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 726