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  1. Work, Technology, and Inequality.Kory P. Schaff - 2019 - In Michael Weber & Michael Cholbi (eds.), The Future of Work, Technology, and Basic Income. London, UK: pp. 90-112.
    Recent technological developments in automation threaten to eliminate the jobs of millions of workers in the near future, raising worrisome questions about how to satisfy their welfare. One proposal for addressing this issue is to provide all citizens with a “universal basic income” (UBI) that ensures everyone with a social minimum. The aim is to give all individuals an unrestricted cash grant that provides them with an income that does not depend on status, wealth, or employment. The question this paper (...)
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  2.  25
    Democratic Rights in the Workplace.Kory P. Schaff - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (4):386-404.
    Abstract In this paper, I pursue the question whether extending democratic rights to work is good in the broadest possible sense of that term: good for workers, firms, market economies, and democratic states. The argument makes two assumptions in a broadly consequentialist framework. First, the configuration of any relationship among persons in which there is less rather than more coercion makes individuals better off. Second, extending democratic rights to work will entail costs and benefits to both the power and authority (...)
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  3.  52
    Kant, Political Liberalism, and the Ethics of Same-Sex Relations.Kory Schaff & Kory P. Schaff - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):446–462.
    I argue that there is nothing in Kant’s moral theory that legitimates condemnation of same-sex relations and that the arguments from natural ends Kant relies on in doing so are unjustified by the constraints placed upon morality to avoid the empirical determination of judgments. In order to make clear why same-sex activity does not contradict the requirements of the moral law, we need to understand Kant’s account of legitimate sexual activity. I provide this reconstruction in the first section, drawing upon (...)
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  4.  14
    Skilled Workers, Family Unification, and Immigration.Kory P. Schaff - 2019
    This piece outlines an argument against recent changes in U.S. immigration policy that aim to give priority in admissions to skilled workers rather than family members seeking unification. I argue that democratic states have a moral obligation to admit individuals seeking unification with family members, rather than give priority to skilled workers.
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  5.  89
    Agency and Institutional Rationality: Foucault’s Critique of Normativity.Kory P. Schaff - 2004 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (1):51-71.
    In this paper, I examine Foucault’s conception of agency by reconstructing two complementary approaches he takes: the ‘analytics of power’, which examines the relation between norms and practice by charting the institutional development within which a set of norms emerge, and the concept of ‘problematization’, which examines reason-giving practices, or varieties of normative justification that legitimize rational institutions and agents’ participation in them. Contrary to the standard caricature, Foucault’s analysis of the relation between norms and institutions does not merely reduce (...)
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  6.  31
    Critical Moral Liberalism: Theory and Practice. [REVIEW]Kory P. Schaff - 1999 - Social Theory and Practice 25 (1):161-164.
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  7.  24
    Foucault and the Critical Tradition.Kory P. Schaff - 2002 - Human Studies 25 (3):323-332.
    The present paper motivates one possible answer to Kant’s question, “What remains of the Enlightenment?” by reinterpreting the relation between Foucault and critical tradition from Kant to the Frankfurt School. The Enlightenment has left us with “normative superstition,” or a healthy form of skepticism about the justification of modern institutions and ideals. Along these lines, I adopt an interpretation of Foucault that diverges from the standard view. I argue that he shares with his detractors a common heritage of this “critical (...)
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    Are There Human Rights?Kory P. Schaff - 2006 - Radical Philosophy Today 2006:261-267.
    Guided by Hegel’s claim that rights are actual only with the modern state, and noting that the “abstract spirit of Kant’s cosmopolitanism” is pervasive in Carol Gould’s Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights, Schaff raises a variety of moral, political, and ontological objections to her account of rights. Most controversially, he argues that if we embrace with Gould the idea that people have rights even if their political community does not grant them, we may play into the hands of imperial aggression (...)
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    Social Reality. [REVIEW]Kory P. Schaff - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (4):629-645.
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    Fair Work: Ethics, Social Policy, Globalization.Kory P. Schaff (ed.) - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book explores a timely topic for philosophers, social scientists, and policy makers concerning ethical theory, social policy, and modern work. It offers international perspectives and comparative analysis that will appeal to academic and policy audiences around the world.
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  11.  9
    Philosophy and the Problems of Work: A Reader.Kory P. Schaff (ed.) - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy and the Problems of Work brings together for the first time important philosophical perspectives on the subject of labor and work. Ranging from selections by historical figures such as Plato, Rousseau, Smith and Marx to contemporary debates in political theory and philosophy of economics, the reader covers a variety of viewpoints across both analytical and Continental traditions, including ancient and modern thinkers, classical and welfare liberals, Marxists, anarchists and feminists.
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