17 found
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  1.  76
    The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
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  2. A Functional Architecture of the Human Brain: Emerging Insights From the Science of Emotion.Kristen A. Lindquist & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):533-540.
  3.  41
    What’s in a Word? Language Constructs Emotion Perception.Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):66-71.
    In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that concepts represented in language are used to create a perception of emotion from the constant ebb and flow of other people’s facial muscle movements. In this “construction hypothesis,” (cf. Gendron, Lindquist, Barsalou, & Barrett, 2012) (see also Barrett, 2006b; Barrett, Lindquist, & Gendron, 2007; Barrett, Mesquita, & Gendron, 2011), language plays a constitutive role in emotion perception because words ground the otherwise highly variable instances of an emotion category. We demonstrate that language (...)
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  4.  40
    Language as Context for the Perception of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327-332.
  5.  39
    Emotions Emerge From More Basic Psychological Ingredients: A Modern Psychological Constructionist Model.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):356-368.
    Over a century ago, William James outlined the first psychological constructionist model of emotion, arguing that emotions are phenomena constructed of more basic psychological parts. In this article, I outline a modern psychological constructionist model of emotion. I first explore the history of psychological construction to demonstrate that psychological constructionist models have historically emerged in an attempt to explain variability in emotion that cannot be accounted for by other approaches. I next discuss the modern psychological constructionist model of emotion that (...)
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  6.  3
    The Role of Language in Emotion: Predictions From Psychological Constructionism.Kristen A. Lindquist, Jennifer K. MacCormack & Holly Shablack - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  7.  14
    When a Word is Worth a Thousand Pictures: Language Shapes Perceptual Memory for Emotion.Cameron M. Doyle & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (1):62-73.
  8.  41
    What Are Emotions and How Are They Created in the Brain?Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Eliza Bliss-Moreau, Hedy Kober & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):172-202.
    In our response, we clarify important theoretical differences between basic emotion and psychological construction approaches. We evaluate the empirical status of the basic emotion approach, addressing whether it requires brain localization, whether localization can be observed with better analytic tools, and whether evidence for basic emotions exists in other types of measures. We then revisit the issue of whether the key hypotheses of psychological construction are supported by our meta-analytic findings. We close by elaborating on commentator suggestions for future research.
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  9.  17
    Emotional Granularity Effects on Event-Related Brain Potentials During Affective Picture Processing.Ja Y. Lee, Kristen A. Lindquist & Chang S. Nam - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  10.  8
    Bodily Contributions to Emotion: Schachter’s Legacy for a Psychological Constructionist View on Emotion.Jennifer K. MacCormack & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):36-45.
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  11.  7
    Constructing Contempt.Victoria L. Spring, C. Daryl Cameron, Kurt Gray & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  12.  28
    The Role of the Amygdala in the Appraising Brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, the nature of such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
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  13.  3
    The Default Mode Network’s Role in Discrete Emotion.Ajay B. Satpute & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2019 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 23 (10):851-864.
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  14.  9
    Language is Powerful.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (1):16-18.
    As Wierzbicka suggests in her recent review, language is powerful in emotion. Wierzbicka's solution is to remove the linguistically relative aspects of emotion concepts, like icing from a cake, to reveal the universal meanings below. In the present commentary, I suggest that language is a more fundamental ingredient in emotion than Wierzbicka's solution assumes; language can be no more removed from emotion, than flour can be removed from an already baked cake. As an alternate solution, I present a constructionist view (...)
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  15. The Embodiment of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2008 - In G. R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.), Embodied Grounding: Social, Cognitive, Affective, and Neuroscientific Approaches. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  16.  37
    Understanding Emotion: Lessons From Anxiety.Katherine S. Button, Glyn Lewis, Marcus R. Munafò, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):145.
    We agree that conceptualisation is key in understanding the brain basis of emotion. We argue that by conflating facial emotion recognition with subjective emotion experience, Lindquist et al. understate the importance of biological predisposition in emotion. We use examples from the anxiety disorders to illustrate the distinction between these two phenomena, emphasising the importance of both emotional hardware and contextual learning.
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  17.  13
    Situation Selection is a Particularly Effective Emotion Regulation Strategy for People Who Need Help Regulating Their Emotions.Thomas L. Webb, Kristen A. Lindquist, Katelyn Jones, Aya Avishai & Paschal Sheeran - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (2):231-248.
    Situation selection involves choosing situations based on their likely emotional impact and may be less cognitively taxing or challenging to implement compared to other strategies for regulating emotion, which require people to regulate their emotions “in the moment”; we thus predicted that individuals who chronically experience intense emotions or who are not particularly competent at employing other emotion regulation strategies would be especially likely to benefit from situation selection. Consistent with this idea, we found that the use of situation selection (...)
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