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  1.  98
    The Pragmatic and Ethical Barriers to Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: The Nike Case.Kristen Bell DeTienne & Lee W. Lewis - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):359-376.
    Numerous studies have documented the demand for information regarding corporations’ relationships to society. Much recent research has demonstrated why stakeholders need this information, and how it benefits both companies and the public. These studies suggest numerous methods by which companies can effectively disclose corporate social responsibility (CSR) information to the public, but in practice, reporting this type of information is fraught with legal and ethical uncertainty often unexplored in most literature. This article represents a fresh analysis of the numerous pragmatic (...)
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  2.  29
    The Impact of Moral Stress Compared to Other Stressors on Employee Fatigue, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover: An Empirical Investigation. [REVIEW]Kristen Bell DeTienne, Bradley R. Agle, James C. Phillips & Marc-Charles Ingerson - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):377-391.
    Moral stress is an increasingly significant concept in business ethics and the workplace environment. This study compares the impact of moral stress with other job stressors on three important employee variables—fatigue, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions—by utilizing survey data from 305 customer-contact employees of a financial institution’s call center. Statistical analysis on the interaction of moral stress and the three employee variables was performed while controlling for other types of job stress as well as demographic variables. The results reveal that (...)
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  3. Practicing the Healer’s Art.Marc-Charles Ingerson, Kristen Bell DeTienne, Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams - 2015 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 34 (1):1-22.
    This article explores the prevailing assumption of instrumentalism in negotiation and argues that contrary to the popular conception in negotiation scholarship, negotiators need not be assumed to be ontologically individualistic or purely self-interested in their motivation and action. We show the contribution that can be made to the field by an approach to negotiation that does not presume a strong and inevitable self-interest as the fundamental starting point of any account of negotiation behavior and we offer ideas for an alternative (...)
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