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  1.  12
    Whose Expertise Is It? Evidence for Autistic Adults as Critical Autism Experts.Kristen Gillespie-Lynch, Steven K. Kapp, Patricia J. Brooks, Jonathan Pickens & Ben Schwartzman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  2.  4
    “For a Long Time Our Voices Have Been Hushed”: Using Student Perspectives to Develop Supports for Neurodiverse College Students.Kristen Gillespie-Lynch, Dennis Bublitz, Annemarie Donachie, Vincent Wong, Patricia J. Brooks & Joanne D’Onofrio - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  3.  29
    Intersubjectivity Evolved to Fit the Brain, but Grammar Co-Evolved with the Brain.Patricia M. Greenfield & Kristen Gillespie-Lynch - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):523-524.
    We propose that some aspects of language evolved to fit the brain, whereas other aspects co-evolved with the brain. Cladistic analysis indicates that common basic structures of both action and grammar arose in phylogeny six million years ago and in ontogeny before age two, with a shared prefrontal neural substrate. In contrast, mirror neurons, found in both humans and monkeys, suggest that the neural basis for intersubjectivity evolved before language. Natural selection acts upon genes controlling the neural substrates of these (...)
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  4.  7
    Designing a Summer Transition Program for Incoming and Current College Students on the Autism Spectrum: A Participatory Approach.Emily Hotez, Christina Shane-Simpson, Rita Obeid, Danielle DeNigris, Michael Siller, Corinna Costikas, Jonathan Pickens, Anthony Massa, Michael Giannola, Joanne D'Onofrio & Kristen Gillespie-Lynch - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  5.  4
    Have We Outgrown the Reduced Social Motivation Theory of Autism?Kristen Gillespie-Lynch - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Although refreshing, Jaswal & Akhtar's critique of the reduced social motivation theory omits reference to Asperger's work and to changes in the diagnostic criteria over time. I situate the theory in the historical contexts that shaped – and eventually contradicted – it to highlight its dehumanizing aspects while emphasizing that critiques should be rooted in recognition of the diversity of the spectrum.
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