Results for 'Kristian Petersen'

717 found
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  1.  11
    Should Violent Offenders Be Forced to Undergo Neurotechnological Treatment? A Critical Discussion of the ‘Freedom of Thought’ Objection.Thomas Søbirk Petersen & Kristian Kragh - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (1):30-34.
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  2.  46
    Understanding the Sources of the Sino-Islamic Intellectual Tradition: A Review Essay on the Sage Learning of Liu Zhi: Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms, by Sachiko Murata, William C. Chittick, and Tu Weiming, and Recent Chinese Literary Treasuries.Kristian Petersen - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (3):546-559.
    An oft-quoted Hadith purports that it is incumbent upon every Muslim to seek knowledge, even if it is to be found as far away as China.1 However, the plethora of knowledge that was discovered there generally has yet to be unraveled by Western academics. If the intellectual tradition of Chinese Muslims may appear to be of minor consequence to the larger field of Islamic studies, this is in part because of our failure to assess their influence. The abundant resources for (...)
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  3. Hvad Er Filosofihistorie? Mindeskrift for Johs. Øtergaard Petersen.Johs Øtergaard Petersen, Nina Bonderup Dohn, Hans Fink, Henning Høh Laursen & Flemming Lebech - 1999
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  4.  27
    A Reverse Index of Greek Nouns and Adjectives. By C. D. Buck and W. Petersen. Pp. Xvii + 765. Chicago: University Press , 1945. £3. [REVIEW]L. J. D. Richardson, C. D. Buck & W. Petersen - 1948 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 68:163-163.
  5.  26
    Response From Kelley, Buckner and Petersen.W. M. Kelley, R. L. Buckner & S. E. Petersen - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (11):421.
  6.  32
    In Search of Immortality: The Political Economy of Anti-Aging Medicine. [REVIEW]Alan Petersen & Kate Seear - 2009 - Medicine Studies 1 (3):267-279.
    In Search of Immortality: The Political Economy of Anti-aging Medicine Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 267-279 DOI 10.1007/s12376-009-0020-x Authors Alan Petersen, Monash University Sociology Program, School of Political and Social Inquiry Clayton VIC 3800 Australia Kate Seear, Monash University Sociology Program, School of Political and Social Inquiry Clayton VIC 3800 Australia Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 Print ISSN 1876-4533 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 3.
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  7. What is Legal Moralism?Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2011 - SATS 12 (1):80-88.
    The aim of this critical commentary is to distinguish and analytically discuss some important variations in which legal moralism is defined in the literature. As such, the aim is not to evaluate the most plausible version of legal moralism, but to find the most plausible definition of legal moralism. As a theory of criminalization, i.e. a theory that aims to justify the criminal law we should retain, legal moralism can be, and has been, defined as follows: the immorality of an (...)
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  8.  90
    A Dual-Networks Architecture of Top-Down Control.Nico U. F. Dosenbach, Damien A. Fair, Alexander L. Cohen, Bradley L. Schlaggar & Steven E. Petersen - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (3):99-105.
  9. Superintelligence as Superethical.Steve Petersen - 2017 - In Patrick Lin, Keith Abney & Ryan Jenkins (eds.), Robot Ethics 2.0. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 322-337.
    Nick Bostrom's book *Superintelligence* outlines a frightening but realistic scenario for human extinction: true artificial intelligence is likely to bootstrap itself into superintelligence, and thereby become ideally effective at achieving its goals. Human-friendly goals seem too abstract to be pre-programmed with any confidence, and if those goals are *not* explicitly favorable toward humans, the superintelligence will extinguish us---not through any malice, but simply because it will want our resources for its own purposes. In response I argue that things might not (...)
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  10. Composition as Pattern.Steve Petersen - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (5):1119-1139.
    I argue for patternism, a new answer to the question of when some objects compose a whole. None of the standard principles of composition comfortably capture our natural judgments, such as that my cat exists and my table exists, but there is nothing wholly composed of them. Patternism holds, very roughly, that some things compose a whole whenever together they form a “real pattern”. Plausibly we are inclined to acknowledge the existence of my cat and my table but not of (...)
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  11. Epistemic Norms of Assertion and Action.Mikkel Gerken & Esben Nedenskov Petersen - forthcoming - In Sanford Goldberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Assertion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The purpose of the present chapter is to survey the work on epistemic norms of action, practical deliberation and assertion and to consider how these norms are interrelated. On a more constructive note, we will argue that if there are important similarities between the epistemic norms of action and assertion, it has important ramifications for the debates over speech acts and harm. Thus, we hope that the chapter will indicate how thinking about assertions as a speech act can benefit from (...)
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  12. Utilitarian Epistemology.Steve Petersen - 2013 - Synthese 190 (6):1173-1184.
    Standard epistemology takes it for granted that there is a special kind of value: epistemic value. This claim does not seem to sit well with act utilitarianism, however, since it holds that only welfare is of real value. I first develop a particularly utilitarian sense of “epistemic value”, according to which it is closely analogous to the nature of financial value. I then demonstrate the promise this approach has for two current puzzles in the intersection of epistemology and value theory: (...)
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  13. Is It Good for Them Too? Ethical Concern for the Sexbots.Steve Petersen - 2017 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social Implications and Ethical. Cambridge, USA: MIT Press. pp. 155-171.
    In this chapter I'd like to focus on a small corner of sexbot ethics that is rarely considered elsewhere: the question of whether and when being a sexbot might be good---or bad---*for the sexbot*. You might think this means you are in for a dry sermon about the evils of robot slavery. If so, you'd be wrong; the ethics of robot servitude are far more complicated than that. In fact, if the arguments here are right, designing a robot to serve (...)
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  14.  47
    Early Stress Predicts Age at Menarche and First Birth, Adult Attachment, and Expected Lifespan.James S. Chisholm, Julie A. Quinlivan, Rodney W. Petersen & David A. Coall - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (3):233-265.
  15. Ethics, Organ Donation and Tax: A Proposal.Thomas Søbirk Petersen & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):451-457.
    Five arguments are presented in favour of the proposal that people who opt in as organ donors should receive a tax break. These arguments appeal to welfare, autonomy, fairness, distributive justice and self-ownership, respectively. Eight worries about the proposal are considered in this paper. These objections focus upon no-effect and counter-productiveness, the Titmuss concern about social meaning, exploitation of the poor, commodification, inequality and unequal status, the notion that there are better alternatives, unacceptable expense, and concerns about the veto of (...)
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  16. Designing People to Serve.Steve Petersen - 2011 - In Patrick Lin, George Bekey & Keith Abney (eds.), Robot Ethics. MIT Press.
    I argue that, contrary to intuition, it would be both possible and permissible to design people - whether artificial or organic - who by their nature desire to do tasks we find unpleasant.
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  17.  7
    The Effect of Phasic Auditory Alerting on Visual Perception.Anders Petersen, Annemarie Hilkjær Petersen, Claus Bundesen, Signe Vangkilde & Thomas Habekost - 2017 - Cognition 165:73-81.
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  18.  42
    Neurotechnological Behavioural Treatment of Criminal Offenders—A Comment on Bomann-Larsen.Jesper Ryberg & Thomas S. Petersen - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):79-83.
    Whether it is morally acceptable to offer rehabilitation by CNS-intervention to criminals as a condition for early release constitutes an important neuroethical question. Bomann-Larsen has recently suggested that such interventions are unacceptable if the offered treatment is not narrowly targeted at the behaviour for which the criminal is convicted. In this article it is argued that Bomann-Larsen’s analysis of the morality of offers does not provide a solid base for this conclusion and that, even if the analysis is assumed to (...)
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  19.  10
    Hearing Loss Impacts Neural Alpha Oscillations Under Adverse Listening Conditions.Eline B. Petersen, Malte Wã¶Stmann, Jonas Obleser, Stefan Stenfelt & Thomas Lunner - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  20.  35
    Predictions, Dangerousness, and Retributivism.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 18 (2):137-151.
    Through the criminal justice system so-called dangerous offenders are, besides the offence that they are being convicted of and sentenced to, also punished for acts that they have not done but that they are believe to be likely to commit in the future. The aim of this paper is to critically discuss whether some adherents of retributivism give a plausible rationale for punishing offenders more harshly if they, all else being equal, by means of predictions are believed to be more (...)
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  21. Less for Recidivists? Why Retributivists Have a Reason to Punish Repeat Offenders Less Harshly Than First-Time Offenders ∗.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2012 - In Jesper Ryberg Claudio Tamburrini (ed.), Recidivists Punishment: The Philosophers' view. Lextington books.
    About 80 % of all convicted have had a prior record of conviction. But how should the state punish repeat offenders (with a prior conviction) as compared with first-time offenders who are convicted? The law in all jurisdictions, a large swathe of public opinion, and the general trend within criminal justice ethics all seem to accept what we may call: -/- Asymmetry A The punishment of repeat offenders should be harsher than the punishment of first-time offenders. -/- This asymmetry is (...)
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  22. Toward an Algorithmic Metaphysics.Steve Petersen - 2013 - In David Dowe (ed.), Algorithmic Probability and Friends: Bayesian Prediction and Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 306-317.
    There are writers in both metaphysics and algorithmic information theory (AIT) who seem to think that the latter could provide a formal theory of the former. This paper is intended as a step in that direction. It demonstrates how AIT might be used to define basic metaphysical notions such as *object* and *property* for a simple, idealized world. The extent to which these definitions capture intuitions about the metaphysics of the simple world, times the extent to which we think the (...)
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  23.  30
    The Ethics of Expectations: Biobanks and the Promise of Personalised Medicine.Alan Petersen - 2009 - Monash Bioethics Review 28 (1):05-1.
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  24.  50
    Uncertainty and God: A Jamesian Pragmatist Approach to Uncertainty and Ignorance in Science and Religion.Arthur Petersen - 2014 - Zygon 49 (4):808-828.
    This article picks up from William James's pragmatism and metaphysics of experience, as expressed in his “radical empiricism,” and further develops this Jamesian pragmatist approach to uncertainty and ignorance by connecting it to phenomenological thought. The Jamesian pragmatist approach avoids both a “crude naturalism” and an “absolutist rationalism,” and allows for identification of intimations of the sacred in both scientific and religious practices—which all, in their respective ways, try to make sense of a complex world. Analogous to religious practices, emotion (...)
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  25.  16
    Disclosure of Individual Research Results in Clinico-Genomic Trials: Challenges, Classification and Criteria for Decision-Making.Regine Kollek & Imme Petersen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):271-275.
    While an ethical obligation to report findings of clinical research to trial participants is increasingly recognised, the academic debate is often vague about what kinds of data should be fed back and how such a process should be organised. In this article, we present a classification of different actors, processes and data involved in the feedback of research results pertaining to an individual. In a second step, we reflect on circumstances requiring further ethical consideration. In regard to a concrete research (...)
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  26. On the Repugnance of the Repugnant Conclusion.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2006 - Theoria 72 (2):126-137.
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the plausibility of a certain position in the philosophical literature within which the Repugnant Conclusion is treated, not as repugnant, but as an acceptable implication of the total welfare principle. I will confine myself to focus primarily on Törbjörn Tännsjö’s presentation. First, I reconstruct Tännsjö’s view concerning the repugnance of the RC in two arguments. The first argument is criticized for (a) addressing the wrong comparison, (b) relying on the controversial claim that (...)
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  27. Book Review: Beyond Retribution: A New Testament Vision for Justice, Crime, and PunishmentBeyond Retribution: A New Testament Vision for Justice, Crime, and PunishmentbyMarshallChristopher D.Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 2001. 342 Pp. $24.00. ISBN 0-8028-4797-8. [REVIEW]Rodney L. Petersen - 2002 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 56 (4):442-442.
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  28.  4
    Horizontal Unfairness and Retrospective Sensemaking.Martin Lund Petersen - 2019 - Philosophy of Management 18 (1):5-22.
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  29.  56
    Logic Without Contraction as Based on Inclusion and Unrestricted Abstraction.Uwe Petersen - 2000 - Studia Logica 64 (3):365-403.
    On the one hand, the absence of contraction is a safeguard against the logical (property theoretic) paradoxes; but on the other hand, it also disables inductive and recursive definitions, in its most basic form the definition of the series of natural numbers, for instance. The reason for this is simply that the effectiveness of a recursion clause depends on its being available after application, something that is usually assured by contraction. This paper presents a way of overcoming this problem within (...)
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  30.  6
    On the Bases of Two Subtypes of Development Dyslexia.Franklin R. Manis, Mark S. Seidenberg, Lisa M. Doi, Catherine McBride-Chang & Alan Petersen - 1996 - Cognition 58 (2):157-195.
  31.  35
    Constituents of Political Cognition: Race, Party Politics, and the Alliance Detection System.David Pietraszewski, Oliver Scott Curry, Michael Bang Petersen, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby - 2015 - Cognition 140:24-39.
    Research suggests that the mind contains a set of adaptations for detecting alliances: an alliance detection system, which monitors for, encodes, and stores alliance information and then modifies the activation of stored alliance categories according to how likely they will predict behavior within a particular social interaction. Previous studies have established the activation of this system when exposed to explicit competition or cooperation between individuals. In the current studies we examine if shared political opinions produce these same effects. In particular, (...)
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  32.  20
    The Politics of Bioethics.Alan R. Petersen - 2011 - Routledge.
    Bioethics as politics -- Bioethics and the politics of expectations -- Engendering consent : bioethics and biobanks -- Missing the big picture : bioethics and stem cell research -- Testing times : bioethics and "do-it-yourself" genetics -- Governing uncertainty : the politics of nanoethics -- Beyond bioethics.
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  33. The Ethics of Robot Servitude.Stephen Petersen - 2007 - Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 19 (1):43-54.
    Assume we could someday create artificial creatures with intelligence comparable to our own. Could it be ethical use them as unpaid labor? There is very little philosophical literature on this topic, but the consensus so far has been that such robot servitude would merely be a new form of slavery. Against this consensus I defend the permissibility of robot servitude, and in particular the controversial case of designing robots so that they want to serve human ends. A typical objection to (...)
     
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  34.  13
    A Quantitative Perspective on Ethics in Large Team Science.Alexander M. Petersen, Ioannis Pavlidis & Ioanna Semendeferi - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):923-945.
    The gradual crowding out of singleton and small team science by large team endeavors is challenging key features of research culture. It is therefore important for the future of scientific practice to reflect upon the individual scientist’s ethical responsibilities within teams. To facilitate this reflection we show labor force trends in the US revealing a skewed growth in academic ranks and increased levels of competition for promotion within the system; we analyze teaming trends across disciplines and national borders demonstrating why (...)
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  35.  42
    Morals or Economics? Institutional Investor Preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility.Henry L. Petersen & Harrie Vredenburg - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):1-14.
    This article presents the results of a study that analysed whether social responsibility had any bearing on the decision making of institutional investors. Being that institutional investors prefer socially aligned organizations, this study explored to what extent the corporate actions and/or social/environmental investments influenced their decisions. Our results suggest that there are specific variables that affect the perceived value of the organization, leading to decisions to not only invest, but whether to hold or sell the shares, and therefore having a (...)
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  36.  35
    Are Ethical Codes of Conduct Toothless Tigers for Dealing with Employment Discrimination?Lars-Eric Petersen & Franciska Krings - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):501-514.
    This study examined the influence of two organizational context variables, codes of conduct and supervisor advice, on personnel decisions in an experimental simulation. Specifically, we studied personnel evaluations and decisions in a situation where codes of conduct conflict with supervisor advice. Past studies showed that supervisors’ advice to prefer ingroup over outgroup candidates leads to discriminatory personnel selection decisions. We extended this line of research by studying how codes of conduct and code enforcement may reduce this form of discrimination. Eighty (...)
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  37.  87
    New Legal Moralism: Some Strengths and Challenges.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):215-232.
    The aim of this paper is to critically discuss the plausibility of legal moralism with an emphasis on some central and recent versions. First, this paper puts forward and defends the thesis that recently developed varieties of legal moralism promoted by Robert P. George, John Kekes and Michael Moore are more plausible than Lord Devlin's traditional account. The main argument for this thesis is that in its more modern versions legal moralism is immune to some of the forceful challenges made (...)
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  38. New Waves in Applied Ethics.Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.) - 2007 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This volume contains work by the very best young scholars working in Applied Ethics, gathering a range of new perspectives and thoughts on highly relevant topics, such as the environment, animals, computers, freedom of speech, human enhancement, war and poverty. For researchers and students working in or around this fascinating area of the discipline, the volume will provide a unique snapshot of where the cutting-edge work in the field is currently engaged and where it's headed.
     
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  39.  10
    Dignity-Preserving Dementia Care: A Metasynthesis.Oscar Tranvåg, Karin A. Petersen & Dagfinn Nåden - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (8):861-880.
    Research indicates the essentiality of dignity as a vital component for quality of life, reconfirming the emphasis on dignity preservation in the international code of nursing ethics. Applying Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnography, the aim of the study was to develop a theory model by synthesizing 10 qualitative articles from various cultural contexts, exploring nurse and allied healthcare professional perception/practice concerning dignity-preserving dementia care. “Advocating the person’s autonomy and integrity,” which involves “having compassion for the person,” “confirming the person’s worthiness and (...)
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  40.  15
    Pragmatic Tools for Sharing Genomic Research Results with the Relatives of Living and Deceased Research Participants.Susan M. Wolf, Emily Scholtes, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):87-109.
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  41. What is a Good Sports Parent?Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2010 - Nordic Journal for Applied Ethics - Etikk I Praksis 4 (1):215-232.
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  42. Egalitarianism and Repugnant Conclusions.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2003 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 38:115-125.
    Most philosophers discuss the Repugnant Conclusion as an objection to total utilitarianism. But this focus on total utilitarianism seems to be one-sided. It conceals the important fact that other competing moral theories are also subject to the Repugnant Conclusion. The primary aim of this paper is to demonstrate that versions of egalitarianism are subject to the Repugnant Conclusion and other repugnant conclusions.
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  43.  11
    Effects of Monitoring for Visual Events on Distinct Components of Attention.Christian H. Poth, Anders Petersen, Claus Bundesen & Werner X. Schneider - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  44.  23
    In Favor of a ‘Fractionation’ View of Ventral Parietal Cortex: Comment on Cabeza Et Al.Steven M. Nelson, Kathleen B. McDermott & Steven E. Petersen - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (8):399-400.
  45. A Normative Yet Coherent Naturalism.Steve Petersen - 2014 - Philo 17 (1):77-91.
    Naturalism is normally taken to be an ideology, censuring non-naturalistic alternatives. But as many critics have pointed out, this ideological stance looks internally incoherent, since it is not obviously endorsed by naturalistic methods. Naturalists who have addressed this problem universally foreswear the normative component of naturalism by, in effect, giving up science’s exclusive claim to legitimacy. This option makes naturalism into an empty expression of personal preference that can carry no weight in the philosophical or political spheres. In response to (...)
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  46.  23
    Folk-Economic Beliefs: An Evolutionary Cognitive Model.Pascal Boyer & Michael Bang Petersen - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41:1-51.
    The domain of “folk-economics” consists in explicit beliefs about the economy held by laypeople, untrained in economics, about such topics as, for example, the causes of the wealth of nations, the benefits or drawbacks of markets and international trade, the effects of regulation, the origins of inequality, the connection between work and wages, the economic consequences of immigration, or the possible causes of unemployment. These beliefs are crucial in forming people's political beliefs and in shaping their reception of different policies. (...)
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  47.  20
    A Question of Balance or Blind Faith?: Scientists' and Science Policymakers' Representations of the Benefits and Risks of Nanotechnologies. [REVIEW]Alan Petersen & Alison Anderson - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (3):243-256.
    In recent years, in the UK and elsewhere, scientists and science policymakers have grappled with the question of how to reap the benefits of nanotechnologies while minimising the risks. Having recognised the importance of public support for future innovations, they have placed increasing emphasis on ‘engaging’ ‘the public’ during the early phase of technology development. Meaningful engagement suggests some common ground between experts and lay publics in relation to the definition of nanotechnologies and of their benefits and risks. However, views (...)
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  48.  9
    Should neurotechnological treatments offered to offenders always be in their best interests?T. S. Petersen - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1):32-36.
    The paper critically discusses the moral view that neurotechnological behavioural treatment for criminal offenders should only be offered if it is in their best interests. First, I show that it is difficult to apply and assess the notion of the offender's best interests unless one has a clear idea of what ‘best interests’ means. Second, I argue that if one accepts that harmful punishment of offenders has a place in the criminal justice system, it seems inconsistent not to accept the (...)
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  49.  31
    On the Partiality of Procreative Beneficence: A Critical Note.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):771-774.
    The aim of this paper is to criticise the well-discussed Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB) lately refined by Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane. First, it is argued that advocates of PB leave us with an implausible justification for the moral partiality towards the child (or children) reproducers decide to bring into existence as compared with all other individuals. This is implausible because the reasons given in favour of the partiality of PB, which are based on practical reason and common-sense morality, (...)
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  50.  22
    The Medical Humanities Today: Humane Health Care or Tool of Governance? [REVIEW]Alan Petersen, Alan Bleakley, Rainer Brömer & Rob Marshall - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):1-4.
    The medical humanities have been presented as a panacea for medical reductionism; a means for ‘humanizing’ medicine. However, there is a lack of consensus about the appropriate contributing disciplines and how curricula should be taught and assessed. This special issue critically examines the role of the medical humanities in medical education and their potential to serve, inadvertently or otherwise, as a tool of governance. The contributors, who include medical educators and medical practitioners, employ a range of perspectives for analysing the (...)
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