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Kristin M. Mickelson
University of Minnesota, Morris
  1. Free Will, Self‐Creation, and the Paradox of Moral Luck.Kristin M. Mickelson - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):224-256.
    How is the problem of free will related to the problem of moral luck? In this essay, I answer that question and outline a new solution to the paradox of moral luck, the source-paradox solution. This solution both explains why the paradox arises and why moral luck does not exist. To make my case, I highlight a few key connections between the paradox of moral luck and two related problems, namely the problem of free will and determinism and the paradox (...)
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  2. The Problem of Free Will and Determinism: An Abductive Approach.Kristin M. Mickelson - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (1):154-172.
    This essay begins by dividing the traditional problem of free will and determinism into a “correlation” problem and an “explanation” problem. I then focus on the explanation problem, and argue that a standard form of abductive (i.e. inference to the best-explanation) reasoning may be useful in solving it. To demonstrate the fruitfulness of the abductive approach, I apply it to three standard accounts of free will. While each account implies the same solution to the correlation problem, each implies a unique (...)
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  3. A Companion to Free Will.Joseph Campbell, Kristin M. Mickelson & V. Alan White (eds.) - forthcoming
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  4. Wiley Companion to Free Will.Joe Campbell, Kristin M. Mickelson & V. Alan White (eds.) - forthcoming - Wiley.
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  5. Constructive Dilemma Arguments for the Impossibility of Free Will.Kristin M. Mickelson - manuscript
    The traditional problem of free will and determinism is ostensibly about settling the relationship between free will and determinism. According to the standard narrative, this problem boils down to settling whether free will stands in a compatibility or incompatibility relation with determinism. Similarly, there is traditional debate over whether a compatibility or an incompatibility relationship holds between free will and indeterminism. Since indeterminism is simply the negation of determinism, anyone who holds that human free will is incompatible with both determinism (...)
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  6. [Temporarily Unavailable; Under Review].Kristin M. Mickelson - manuscript
     
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  7. [Temporarily Unavailable; Under Review].Kristin M. Mickelson - manuscript
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  8. (In)Compatibilism.Kristin M. Mickelson - forthcoming - In Joseph Campbell (ed.), Companion to Free Will. New York: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This chapter offers the reader some useful tools for identifying and assessing the distinct views and debates currently associated with the terms ‘compatibilism’ and ‘incompatibilism’. It begins with a discussion of the two relata of free-will (in)compatibilism, namely the free-will relatum (§2) and the determinism relatum (§3). The next section (§4) provides an overview of five relations which are commonly said to hold (or not hold) between these relata: conceptual (in)compatibility, logical (in)compatibility, logical (in)consistency, metaphysical (in)compatibility, and metaphysical (in)compossibility. In (...)
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  9. [Temporarily Unavailable; Under Review].Kristin M. Mickelson - manuscript
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    The Zygote Argument Is Still Invalid: So What?Kristin M. Mickelson - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-18.
    In “The Zygote Argument is Invalid: Now What?”, Kristin Mickelson argues that Alfred Mele’s original Zygote Argument is invalid: its two premises tell us merely that the truth of determinism is correlated with the absence of free human agents, but the argument nonetheless concludes with a specific explanation for that correlation, namely that deterministic laws preclude—rule out, destroy, undermine, make impossible, rob us of—free will. In a recent essay, Gabriel De Marco grants that the original Zygote Argument is invalid for (...)
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