Results for 'Kristin S. Steinsbekk'

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  1.  5
    Personalized Medicine, Digital Technology and Trust: A Kantian Account.Bjørn K. Myskja & Kristin S. Steinsbekk - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (4):577-587.
    Trust relations in the health services have changed from asymmetrical paternalism to symmetrical autonomy-based participation, according to a common account. The promises of personalized medicine emphasizing empowerment of the individual through active participation in managing her health, disease and well-being, is characteristic of symmetrical trust. In the influential Kantian account of autonomy, active participation in management of own health is not only an opportunity, but an obligation. Personalized medicine is made possible by the digitalization of medicine with an ensuing increased (...)
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  2.  23
    We’Re Not in It for the Money—Lay People’s Moral Intuitions on Commercial Use of ‘Their’ Biobank.Kristin Solum Steinsbekk, Lars Øystein Ursin, John-Arne Skolbekken & Berge Solberg - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):151-162.
    Great hope has been placed on biobank research as a strategy to improve diagnostics, therapeutics and prevention. It seems to be a common opinion that these goals cannot be reached without the participation of commercial actors. However, commercial use of biobanks is considered morally problematic and the commercialisation of human biological materials is regulated internationally by policy documents, conventions and laws. For instance, the Council of Europe recommends that: “Biological materials should not, as such, give rise to financial gain”. Similarly, (...)
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  3.  13
    Between a “ROC” and a School Place: The Role ofRacial Opportunity Costin the Educational Experiences of Academically Successful Students of Color.Terah Venzant Chambers, Kristin S. Huggins, Leslie A. Locke & Rhonda M. Fowler - 2014 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 50 (5):464-497.
  4.  67
    Agriculture, Ethics, and Restrictions on Property Rights.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1988 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (1):21-40.
    The argument in this essay is twofold. (1) Procedural justice requires,in particular cases, that we restrict property rights in natural resources, e.g., California agricultural land or Appalachian coal land. (2) Conditions imposed by Locke's political theory and by dense population require,in general, that we restrict property rights in finite or non-renewable natural resources such as land. If these arguments are correct, then we have a moral imperative to use land-use controls (such as taxation, planning, zoning, and acreage limitations) to restructure (...)
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  5.  18
    Island Biogeography, Species-Area Curves, and Statistical Errors: Applied Biology and Scientific Rationality.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:447 - 456.
    When Kangas suggested in 1986 that wildlife reserve designs could be much smaller than previously thought, community ecologists attacked his views on methodological grounds (island biogeographical theory is beset with uncertainties) and on conservation grounds (Kangas seemed to encourage deforestation and extinction). Kangas' defenders, like Simberloff, argued that in a situation of biological uncertainty (the degree/type of deforestation-induced extinction), scientists ought to follow the epistemologically conservative course and risk type-II error (the risk of not rejecting a null hypothesis that is (...)
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  6.  6
    Agriculture, Ethics, and Restrictions on Property Rights.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1988 - Journal of Agricultural Ethics 1 (1):21-40.
  7.  27
    Biobanks--When is Re-Consent Necessary?K. S. Steinsbekk & B. Solberg - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):236-250.
    The unknown nature of tomorrow’s research makes informed consent in biobank research a challenge. Whether the consent given by biobank participants is ‘broad’ or ‘narrow’, the ever present question remains the same: are new activities covered by the original consent? In this article, we focus on the meaning of, and the relation between, broad consent and re-consent in biobank research. We argue that broad consent should be understood as consenting to a framework—a framework which covers aims, core conditions for acceptable (...)
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  8. Spinoza’s ‘Infinite Modes’ Reconsidered.Kristin Primus - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):1-29.
    My two principal aims in this essay are interconnected. One aim is to provide a new interpretation of the ‘infinite modes’ in Spinoza’s Ethics. I argue that for Spinoza, God, conceived as the one infinite and eternal substance, is not to be understood as causing two kinds of modes, some infinite and eternal and the rest finite and non-eternal. That there cannot be such a bifurcation of divine effects is what I take the ‘infinite mode’ propositions, E1p21–23, to establish; E1p21–23 (...)
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  9.  40
    The Soft-Line Solution to Pereboom's Four-Case Argument.Kristin Demetriou - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):595-617.
    Derk Pereboom's Four-Case Argument is among the most famous and resilient manipulation arguments against compatibilism. I contend that its resilience is not a function of the argument's soundness but, rather, the ill-gotten gain from an ambiguity in the description of the causal relations found in the argument's foundational case. I expose this crucial ambiguity and suggest that a dilemma faces anyone hoping to resolve it. After a thorough search for an interpretation which avoids both horns of this dilemma, I conclude (...)
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  10.  22
    Environmental Risk and the Iron Triangle: The Case of Yucca Mountain.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):753-777.
    Despite significant scientific uncertainties and strong public opposition, there appears to be an “iron triangle” of industry, government,and consultants/contractors promoting the siting of the world’s first permanent geological repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel, proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Arguing that representatives of this iron triangle have ignored important epistemological and ethical difficulties with the proposed facility, I conclude that the business climate surrounding this triangle appears to leave little room for consideration of ethical issues related to public (...)
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  11.  6
    Biomass and Effects of Airborne Ultrafine Particulates: Lessons About State Variables in Ecology. [REVIEW]Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):44-48.
  12.  12
    Book ReviewAvner De‐Shalit,. The Environment: Between Theory and Practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. 238. $55.00. [REVIEW]Kristin S. Shrader‐Frechette - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):364-366.
  13. Letter to the Editor.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1981 - Science, Technology and Human Values 6 (4):66-68.
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  14. Property and Procedural Justice.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1991 - In Charles V. Blatz (ed.), Ethics and Agriculture: An Anthology on Current Issues in World Context. University of Idaho Press. pp. 160.
     
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  15. Probabilistic Uncertainty and Technological Risks.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1993 - In René von Schomberg (ed.), Science, Politics, and Morality: Scientific Uncertainty and Decision Making. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  16. Technology Assessment as Applied Philosophy of Science.Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette - 1980 - Science, Technology and Human Values 5 (4):33-50.
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  17. The Soft-Line Solution to Pereboom's Four-Case Argument.Kristin Mickelson - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):595-617.
    Derk Pereboom's Four-Case Argument is among the most famous and resilient manipulation arguments against compatibilism. I contend that its resilience is not a function of the argument's soundness but, rather, the ill-gotten gain from an ambiguity in the description of the causal relations found in the argument's foundational case. I expose this crucial ambiguity and suggest that a dilemma faces anyone hoping to resolve it. After a thorough search for an interpretation which avoids both horns of this dilemma, I conclude (...)
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  18. It’s in Your Nature: A Pluralistic Folk Psychology.Kristin Andrews - 2008 - Synthese 165 (1):13 - 29.
    I suggest a pluralistic account of folk psychology according to which not all predictions or explanations rely on the attribution of mental states, and not all intentional actions are explained by mental states. This view of folk psychology is supported by research in developmental and social psychology. It is well known that people use personality traits to predict behavior. I argue that trait attribution is not shorthand for mental state attributions, since traits are not identical to beliefs or desires, and (...)
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  19. A Critique of Vihvelin’s Three-Fold Classification.Kristin Mickelson - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):85-99.
    In this essay, I argue for the rejection of Vihvelin's ‘Three-fold Classification’ , a nonstandard taxonomy of free-will compatibilism, incompatibilism, and impossibilism. Vihvelin is right that the standard taxonomy of these views is inadequate, and that a new taxonomy is needed to clarify the free-will debate. Significantly, Vihvelin notes that the standard formal definition of ‘incompatibilism’ does not capture the historically popular view that deterministic laws pose a threat to free will. Vihvelin's proposed solution is to redefine ‘incompatibilism.’ However, Vihvelin's (...)
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  20.  83
    Women’s Anger, Epistemic Personhood, and Self-Respect: An Application of Lehrer’s Work on Self-Trust.Kristin Borgwald - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 161 (1):69-76.
    I argue in this paper that the work of Keith Lehrer, especially in his book Self-Trust has applications to feminist ethics; specifically care ethics, which has become the leading form of normative sentimentalist ethics. I extend Lehrer's ideas concerning reason and justification of belief beyond what he says by applying the notion of evaluation central to his account of acceptance to the need for evaluation of emotions. The inability to evaluate and attain justification of one's emotions is an epistemic failure (...)
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  21.  29
    Behavioral Evaluation of Consciousness in Severe Brain Damage.S. Majerus, H. Gill-Thwaites, Kristin Andrews & Steven Laureys - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  22.  22
    Pursuing Health Equity: Zoning Codes and Public Health.Montrece McNeill Ransom, Amelia Greiner, Chris Kochtitzky & Kristin S. Major - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):94-97.
    Health equity can be defined as the absence of disadvantage to individuals and communities in health outcomes, access to health care, and quality of health care regardless of one’s race, gender, nationality, age, ethnicity, religion, and socioeconomic status. Health equity concerns those disparities in public health that can be traced to unequal, systemic economic, and social conditions. Despite significant improvements in the health of the overall population, health inequities in America persist. Racial and ethnic minorities continue to experience higher rates (...)
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  23.  9
    Pursuing Health Equity: Zoning Codes and Public Health.Montrece McNeill Ransom, Amelia Greiner, Chris Kochtitzky & Kristin S. Major - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):94-97.
    Health equity can be defined as the absence of disadvantage to individuals and communities in health outcomes, access to health care, and quality of health care regardless of one’s race, gender, nationality, age, ethnicity, religion, and socioeconomic status. Health equity concerns those disparities in public health that can be traced to unequal, systemic economic, and social conditions. Despite significant improvements in the health of the overall population, health inequities in America persist. Racial and ethnic minorities continue to experience higher rates (...)
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  24.  10
    Paying Attention to Distress: What's Wrong with Rumination?Stephanie S. Rude, Kacey Little Maestas & Kristin Neff - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (4):843-864.
  25.  32
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Nora K. Bell, Samantha J. Brennan, William F. Bristow, Diana H. Coole, Justin DArms, Michael S. Davis, Daniel A. Dombrowski, John J. P. Donnelly, Anthony J. Ellis, Mark C. Fowler, Alan E. Fuchs, Chris Hackler, Garth L. Hallett, Rita C. Manning, Kevin E. Olson, Lansing R. Pollock, Marc Lee Raphael, Robert A. Sedler, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Kristin S. Schrader‐Frechette, Anita Silvers, Doran Smolkin, Alan G. Soble, James P. Sterba, Stephen P. Turner & Eric Watkins - 2001 - Ethics 111 (2):446-459.
  26.  22
    Can an Agent’s False Belief Be Corrected by an Appropriate Communication? Psychological Reasoning in 18-Month-Old Infants.Hyun-joo Song, Kristine H. Onishi, Renée Baillargeon & Cynthia Fisher - 2008 - Cognition 109 (3):295-315.
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  27.  12
    The Action–Sentence Compatibility Effect: It's All in the Timing.Kristin L. Borreggine & Michael P. Kaschak - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (6):1097-1112.
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  28.  11
    Rest Improves Performance, Nature Improves Happiness: Assessment of Break Periods on the Abbreviated Vigilance Task.Kristin M. Finkbeiner, Paul N. Russell & William S. Helton - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:277-285.
  29.  29
    Core Knowledge and its Limits: The Domain of Food.Kristin Shutts, Kirsten F. Condry, Laurie R. Santos & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):120-140.
  30.  17
    Can an Agent's False Belief Be Corrected by an Appropriate Communication? Psychological Reasoning in 18-Month-Old Infants.Cynthia Fisher Hyun-joo Song, Kristine H. Onishi, Renée Baillargeon - 2008 - Cognition 109 (3):295.
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  31.  6
    Meteorology's Struggle for Professional Recognition in the USA (1900–1950).Kristine C. Harper - 2006 - Annals of Science 63 (2):179-199.
    Summary Meteorology, a scientific discipline almost exclusively associated with weather forecasting in the first half of the twentieth century in the USA, was viewed with disdain by more mathematically based scientific communities. A descriptive science lacking in physical and mathematical rigor, meteorology was typically without an academic home in US colleges and universities. This stood in sharp contrast to the meteorological communities across the Atlantic which were supported by dedicated geophysical institutes. Four factors kept US meteorologists, unlike their European colleagues, (...)
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  32.  38
    Subjective Agency and Awareness of Shared Actions.Lars Strother, Kristin A. House & Sukhvinder S. Obhi - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):12-20.
    Voluntary actions and their distal effects are intimately related in conscious awareness. When an expected effect follows a voluntary action, the experience of the interval between these events is compressed in time, a phenomenon known as ‘intentional binding’ . Current accounts of IB suggest that it serves to reinforce associations between our goals and our intention to attain these goals via action, and that IB only occurs for self-generated actions. We used a novel approach to study IB in the context (...)
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  33.  17
    How to Study Animal Minds.Kristin Andrews - 2020 - Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Comparative psychology, the multidisciplinary study of animal behavior and psychology, confronts the challenge of how to study animals we find cute and easy to anthropomorphize, and animals we find odd and easy to objectify, without letting these biases negatively impact the science. In this Element, Kristin Andrews identifies and critically examines the principles of comparative psychology and shows how they can introduce other biases by objectifying animal subjects and encouraging scientists to remain detached. Andrews outlines the scientific benefits of (...)
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  34. The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition.Kristin Andrews - 2014 - Routledge.
    The study of animal cognition raises profound questions about the minds of animals and philosophy of mind itself. Aristotle argued that humans are the only animal to laugh, but in recent experiments rats have also been shown to laugh. In other experiments, dogs have been shown to respond appropriately to over two hundred words in human language. In this introduction to the philosophy of animal minds Kristin Andrews introduces and assesses the essential topics, problems and debates as they cut (...)
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  35.  23
    Replies to Kristin Andrews’s, Gordon Belot’s, and Patrick Forber’s Reviews: Elliott Sober: Ockham’s Razors: A User’s Manual. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016, 322pp, $29.99 PB, $99.99 HB.Elliott Sober - 2016 - Metascience 25 (3):393-403.
  36. Risk, Harm and Intervention: The Case of Child Obesity.Michael S. Merry & Kristin Voigt - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):191-200.
    In this paper we aim to demonstrate the enormous ethical complexity that is prevalent in child obesity cases. This complexity, we argue, favors a cautious approach. Against those perhaps inclined to blame neglectful parents, we argue that laying the blame for child obesity at the feet of parents is simplistic once the broader context is taken into account. We also show that parents not only enjoy important relational prerogatives worth defending, but that children, too, are beneficiaries of that relationship in (...)
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  37.  8
    Collectives in Organizations Appear Less Morally Motivated Than Individuals.Arthur S. Jago, Tamar A. Kreps & Kristin Laurin - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (12):2229-2244.
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  38. The Zygote Argument is Invalid: Now What?Kristin Mickelson - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (11):2911-2929.
    Alfred Mele’s original Zygote Argument is invalid. At most, its premises entail the negative thesis that free action is incompossible with deterministic laws, but its conclusion asserts the positive thesis that deterministic laws preclude free action. The original, explanatory conclusion of the Zygote Argument can be defended only by supplementing the Zygote Argument with a best-explanation argument that identifies deterministic laws as menacing. Arguably, though, the best explanation for the manipulation victim’s lack of freedom and responsibility is his constitutive luck, (...)
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  39.  4
    Immigration and Women's Empowerment: Salvadorans in Los Angeles.Kristine M. Zentgraf - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (5):625-646.
    Recent discoveries that immigrant women often evaluate their experience more positively than men do have led to speculation that women view their public- and domestic-sphere status and power as having increased as a result of postimmigration employment outside of the home. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 25 Salvadoran women who migrated to Southern California in the 1970s and 1980s, challenges a unilinear, integrationist view that sees immigrant women's status and roles as changing along a traditional-modern continuum. Immigrant women's (...)
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  40.  39
    Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women. [REVIEW]Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite the norm for (...)
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  41.  52
    Naïve Normativity: The Social Foundation of Moral Cognition.Kristin Andrews - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (1):36-56.
    To answer tantalizing questions such as whether animals are moral or how morality evolved, I propose starting with a somewhat less fraught question: do animals have normative cognition? Recent psychological research suggests that normative thinking, or ought-thought, begins early in human development. Recent philosophical research suggests that folk psychology is grounded in normative thought. Recent primatology research finds evidence of sophisticated cultural and social learning capacities in great apes. Drawing on these three literatures, I argue that the human variety of (...)
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  42. A Phenomenological Analysis of Bodily Self-Awareness in the Experience of Pain and Pleasure: On Dys-Appearance and Eu-Appearance. [REVIEW]Kristin Zeiler - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):333-342.
    The aim of this article is to explore nuances within the field of bodily self-awareness. My starting-point is phenomenological. I focus on how the subject experiences her or his body, i.e. how the body stands forth to the subject. I build on the phenomenologist Drew Leder’s distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. In bodily dis-appearance, I am only prereflectively aware of my body. My body is not a thematic object of my experience. Bodily dys-appearance takes place when the body appears (...)
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  43. Scientia Intuitiva in the Ethics.Kristin Primus - 2017 - In The Critical Guide to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 169-186.
    Abstract: Cognition of the third kind, or scientia intuitiva, is supposed to secure beatitudo, or virtue itself (E5p42). But what is scientia intuitiva, and how is it different from (and superior to) reason? I suggest a new answer to this old and vexing question at the core of Spinoza’s project in the Ethics. On my view, Spinoza’s scientia intuitiva resembles Descartes’s scientia more than has been appreciated. Although Spinoza’s God is not Descartes’s benevolent, transcendent God, Spinoza agrees with Descartes that (...)
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  44. Chimpanzee Rights: The Philosophers' Brief.Kristin Andrews, Gary Comstock, G. K. D. Crozier, Sue Donaldson, Andrew Fenton, Tyler John, L. Syd M. Johnson, Robert Jones, Will Kymlicka, Letitia Meynell, Nathan Nobis, David M. Pena-Guzman & Jeff Sebo - 2018 - London: Routledge.
    In December 2013, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) filed a petition for a common law writ of habeas corpus in the New York State Supreme Court on behalf of Tommy, a chimpanzee living alone in a cage in a shed in rural New York (Barlow, 2017). Under animal welfare laws, Tommy’s owners, the Laverys, were doing nothing illegal by keeping him in those conditions. Nonetheless, the NhRP argued that given the cognitive, social, and emotional capacities of chimpanzees, Tommy’s confinement constituted (...)
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  45.  5
    Memory for “Mean” Over “Nice”: The Influence of Threat on Children’s Face Memory.Katherine D. Kinzler & Kristin Shutts - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):775-783.
  46.  1
    Herder's Hermeneutics: History, Poetry, Enlightenment.Kristin Gjesdal - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Through a detailed study of Herder's Enlightenment thought, especially his philosophy of literature, Kristin Gjesdal offers a new and sometimes provocative reading of the historical origins and contemporary challenges of modern hermeneutics. She shows that hermeneutic philosophy grew out of a historical, anthropological, and poetic discourse in the mid-eighteenth century and argues that, as such, it represents a rich, stimulating, and relevant engagement with the potentials and limits of human meaning and understanding. Gjesdal's study broadens our conception of hermeneutic (...)
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  47. The Folk Psychological Spiral: Explanation, Regulation, and Language.Kristin Andrews - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (S1):50-67.
    The view that folk psychology is primarily mindreading beliefs and desires has come under challenge in recent years. I have argued that we also understand others in terms of individual properties such as personality traits and generalizations from past behavior, and in terms of group properties such as stereotypes and social norms (Andrews 2012). Others have also argued that propositional attitude attribution isn’t necessary for predicting others’ behavior, because this can be done in terms of taking Dennett’s Intentional Stance (Zawidzki (...)
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  48.  27
    “I Is Someone Else”: Constituting the Extended Mind’s Fourth Wave, with Hegel.J. M. Fritzman & Kristin Thornburg - 2016 - Essays in Philosophy 17 (2):156-190.
    We seek to constitute the extended mind’s fourth wave, socially distributed group cognition, and we do so by thinking with Hegel. The extended mind theory’s first wave invokes the parity principle, which maintains that processes that occur external to the organism’s skin should be considered mental if they are regarded as mental when they occur inside the organism. The second wave appeals to the complementarity principle, which claims that what is crucial is that these processes together constitute a cognitive system. (...)
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  49. Chimpanzee Theory of Mind: Looking in All the Wrong Places?Kristin Andrews - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (5):521-536.
    I respond to an argument presented by Daniel Povinelli and Jennifer Vonk that the current generation of experiments on chimpanzee theory of mind cannot decide whether chimpanzees have the ability to reason about mental states. I argue that Povinelli and Vonk’s proposed experiment is subject to their own criticisms and that there should be a more radical shift away from experiments that ask subjects to predict behavior. Further, I argue that Povinelli and Vonk’s theoretical commitments should lead them to accept (...)
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  50. Chimpanzee Theory of Mind: Looking in All the Wrong Places?Kristin Andrews - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (5):521-536.
    : I respond to an argument presented by Daniel Povinelli and Jennifer Vonk that the current generation of experiments on chimpanzee theory of mind cannot decide whether chimpanzees have the ability to reason about mental states. I argue that Povinelli and Vonk's proposed experiment is subject to their own criticisms and that there should be a more radical shift away from experiments that ask subjects to predict behavior. Further, I argue that Povinelli and Vonk's theoretical commitments should lead them to (...)
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