Results for 'Kristine Anderson Dougherty'

996 found
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  1.  18
    Private Sociology: Unsparing Reflections, Uncommon Gains.Isaac D. Balbus, Sarah Brabant, William B. Brown, Kristine Anderson Dougherty, Don Eckard, Carolyn Ellis, David O. Friedrichs, Ann Goetting, Barbara A. Haley, Ross Koppel, Marianne A. Paget, Douglas V. Porpora, Larry T. Reynolds, Carol Rambo Ronai, Barbara Katz Rothman, Joseph W. Ruane, Don H. Shamblin, Z. G. Standing Bear, Robert L. Stewart, Roger A. Straus, Richard Quinney & Jan Yager (eds.) - 1996 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Each contributor to this book has used personal experience as the basis from which to frame his individual sociological perspectives. Because they have personalized their work, their accounts are real, and recognizable as having come from 'real' persons, about 'real' experiences. There are no objectively-distanced disembodied third person entities in these accounts. These writers are actual people whose stories will make you laugh, cry, think, and want to know more.
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  2.  27
    An analysis of child protection ‘standard operating procedures for research’ in higher education institutions in the United Kingdom.Duncan Randall, Kristin Childers-Buschle, Anna Anderson & Julie Taylor - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):66.
    Interest in children’s agency within the research process has led to a renewed consideration of the relationships between researchers and children. Child protection concerns are sometimes not recognised by researchers, and sometimes ignored. Yet much research on children’s lives, especially in health, has the potential to uncover child abuse. University research guidance should be in place to safeguard both researchers and the populations under scrutiny. The aim of this study was to examine university guidance on protecting children in research contexts.
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  3.  38
    Gendering violence: Masculinity and power in men's accounts of domestic violence.Debra Umberson & Kristin L. Anderson - 2001 - Gender and Society 15 (3):358-380.
    This article examines the construction of gender within men's accounts of domestic violence. Analyses of in-depth interviews conducted with 33 domestically violent heterosexual men indicate that these batterers used diverse strategies to present themselves as nonviolent, capable, and rational men. Respondents performed gender by contrasting effectual male violence with ineffectual female violence, by claiming that female partners were responsible for the violence in their relationships and by constructing men as victims of a biased criminal justice system. This study suggests that (...)
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  4.  47
    To Utopia Via the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis: Elgin's Láadan.Kristine Anderson - 1991 - Utopian Studies 3:92-98.
  5.  5
    Who Gets Out?: Gender as Structure and the Dissolution of Violent Heterosexual Relationships.Kristin L. Anderson - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (2):173-201.
    This article applies a structuralist perspective on gender to investigate predictors of marital dissolution among men and women who are victimized by partner violence. Using panel data from the first and second waves of the National Survey of Families and Households, the study investigates the question of whether the differential positioning of heterosexual women and men in the structure of gender inequality affects their likelihood of getting out of two types of violent relationships—those characterized by minor/symmetrical violence and those characterized (...)
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  6.  5
    Women, Space and Utopia, 1600-1800.Kristine J. Anderson - 2006 - Utopian Studies 17 (3):576-579.
  7.  22
    Participant Reactions to a Literacy-Focused, Web-Based Informed Consent Approach for a Genomic Implementation Study.Stephanie A. Kraft, Kathryn M. Porter, Devan M. Duenas, Claudia Guerra, Galen Joseph, Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Kelly J. Shipman, Jake Allen, Donna Eubanks, Tia L. Kauffman, Nangel M. Lindberg, Katherine Anderson, Jamilyn M. Zepp, Marian J. Gilmore, Kathleen F. Mittendorf, Elizabeth Shuster, Kristin R. Muessig, Briana Arnold, Katrina A. B. Goddard & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (1):1-11.
    Background: Clinical genomic implementation studies pose challenges for informed consent. Consent forms often include complex language and concepts, which can be a barrier to diverse enrollment, and these studies often blur traditional research-clinical boundaries. There is a move toward self-directed, web-based research enrollment, but more evidence is needed about how these enrollment approaches work in practice. In this study, we developed and evaluated a literacy-focused, web-based consent approach to support enrollment of diverse participants in an ongoing clinical genomic implementation study. (...)
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  8. We would like to thank the following for contributing to the journal as reviewers this past year: Rebecca Abraham Fred Adams.Ken Aizawa, Anna Alexandrova, Sophie Allen, Michael Anderson, Holly Anderson, Kristin Andrews, Andre Ariew, Edward Averill & Andrew R. Bailey - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (6):859-860.
  9.  2
    Book Review: Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity by Liberty Walther Barnes. [REVIEW]Kristin L. Anderson - 2015 - Gender and Society 29 (4):605-607.
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  10.  8
    A THRESHOLD FOR ENHANCING HUMAN LIFE: anderson on capability and vulnerability.Kristine A. Culp - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):231-244.
    This essay considers Pamela Sue Anderson’s work in relation to her participation in the Enhancing Life Project from 2015 until her death in 2017. Offering a critical interpretation and reconstruction of Anderson’s final work, this essay also gestures beyond it. It begins by narrating her participation in the Enhancing Life Project. Next, it focuses on her treatment of capability and vulnerability, identifying shifts in her thought and bringing theological symbols and a constructive theological interest to the conversation. (...) depicted the relation of capability and vulnerability as a “threshold for enhancing human life.” This contribution examines her implied metaphor of a spatial or temporal crossing point and evaluates Anderson’s original post-Kantian conceptualization of threshold in relation to the shifts in her thinking. A sympathetic but more adequate approach to enhancing vulnerable life can be informed by Simone de Beauvoir’s phenomenological approach to lived experience and her construal of the body as a lived situation. When vulnerability is interpreted as a situated susceptibility to being changed, for good or for ill, then threshold language can be reintroduced in relation to the intensification, enhancement, and transformation of life, that is, of the “aliveness of life.”. (shrink)
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  11. Philosophical Psychology would like to thank the following for contributing to the journal as reviewers this past year: Fred Adams Kenneth Aizawa.Joshua Alexander, Mark Alicke, Holly Andersen, Michael Anderson, Kristin Andrews, István Aranyosi, Nomy Arpaly, Robert Audi & Andrew R. Bailey - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):161-163.
  12. Kristine Anderson.Two Feminist Ventures - 1991 - Utopian Studies 2:124.
  13. The Zygote Argument is invalid: Now what?Kristin Mickelson - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (11):2911-2929.
    This paper is based on the comments I gave to Alfred Mele regarding his original Zygote Argument during my presentation at a small workshop on manipulation arguments in Budapest back in 2012. After those comments, Mele changed the conclusion of his original Zygote Argument (OZA) from a positive, explanatory conclusion to a negative, non-explanatory conclusion--and, correspondingly, redefined 'incompatibilism' so that it would no longer refer in his work to the view that determinism precludes (undermines, eliminates, destroys, etc.) free will, but (...)
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  14. Paternalism and Equality.Kristin Voigt - 2015 - In Thomas Schramme (ed.), New Perspectives on Paternalism and Health Care. Cham: Springer Verlag.
    Paternalistic interventions restrict individuals’ liberty or autonomy so as to guide their decisions towards options that are more beneficial for them than the ones they would choose in the absence of such interventions. Although some philosophers have emphasised that there is a case for justifiable paternalism in certain circumstances, much of contemporary moral and political philosophy works from a strong presumption against paternalistic interventions. However, Richard Arneson has argued that there are egalitarian reasons that support the case for paternalism: paternalistic (...)
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  15.  25
    Women and men political theorists: enlightened conversations.Kristin Waters (ed.) - 2000 - Malden, Mass.: Blackwell.
    This much-anticipated work is a rich and insightful collection of essays that restores women and minorities to the arena of political theory and debate.
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  16. The concept of cinematic excess.Kristin Thompson - 1986 - In Philip Rosen (ed.), Narrative, apparatus, ideology: a film theory reader. New York: Columbia University Press. pp. 130--142.
     
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  17.  22
    The Art of Politics as Weaving in Plato’s Statesman.Kristin Sampson - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):485-500.
    This article asserts the significance of the portrayal of the political art of statesmanship as weaving, and aims to show how this image emphasizes two main aspects of the political art of statesmanship. Firstly, the image implies a three-dimensionality, both through the process of weaving and through the thickness of the protective fabric this produces, that in turn indicates the vital aspect of corporeality in politics. Secondly, weaving as a paradigmatic example of the art of statesmanship presents a way of (...)
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  18.  11
    Erfahrungsraum Stille: eine ästhetisch phänomenologische Betrachtung.Kristin Wenzel - 2018 - Berlin: Kulturverlag Kadmos.
    Ereignet sich anstelle von Klang oder Sprache, Musik oder Lärm lediglich Stille oder vielmehr das, was wir für Stille halten, kommt ein unerwartetes Aufmerken in Gang. Die Stille kann auffordern, genauer hinzuhören, aber auch genauer hinzusehen. Ein plötzliches Aufmerken geschieht jedoch nur, wenn die Stille den Wahrnehmenden unerwartet trifft. Einer im Alltäglichen zumeist durch die Priorität des Bewussten, Bekannten oder Vertrauten untergeordneten Stille, können Arbeiten, wie jene von Aernout Mik, eine konkrete Erfahrbarkeit geben. Was er erfahrbar werden lässt, ist aber (...)
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  19. Process Philosophy: Via Idearum or Via Negativa?Anderson Weekes - 2004 - In Michel Weber (ed.), After Whitehead: Rescher on process metaphysics. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag. pp. 223-266.
    Nicholas Rescher’s way of understanding process philosophy reflects the ambitions of his own philosophical project and commits him to a conceptually ideal interpretation of process. Process becomes a transcendental idea of reflection that can always be predicated of our knowledge of the world and of the world qua known, but not necessarily of reality an sich. Rescher’s own taxonomy of process thinking implies that it has other variants. While Rescher’s approach to process philosophy makes it intelligible and appealing to mainstream (...)
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  20.  9
    Canonical Universes and Intuitions About Probabilities.Randall Dougherty & Jan Mycielski - 2006 - Dialectica 60 (4):357-368.
    This paper consists of three parts supplementing the papers of K. Hauser 2002 and D. Mumford 2000: There exist regular open sets of points in with paradoxical properties, which are constructed without using the axiom of choice or the continuum hypothesis. There exist canonical universes of sets in which one can define essentially all objects of mathematical analysis and in which all our intuitions about probabilities are true. Models satisfying the full axiom of choice cannot satisfy all those intuitions and (...)
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  21. Spinoza’s Monism I: Ruling Out Eternal-Durational Causation.Kristin Primus - 2023 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 105 (2):265-288.
    In this essay, I suggest that Spinoza acknowledges a distinction between formal reality that is infinite and timelessly eternal and formal reality that is non-infinite (i. e., finite or indefinite) and non-eternal (i. e., enduring). I also argue that if, in Spinoza’s system, only intelligible causation is genuine causation, then infinite, timelessly eternal formal reality cannot cause non-infinite, non-eternal formal reality. A denial of eternal-durational causation generates a puzzle, however: if no enduring thing – not even the sempiternal, indefinite individual (...)
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  22. Spinoza’s Monism II: A Proposal.Kristin Primus - 2023 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 105 (3):444-469.
    An old question in Spinoza scholarship is how finite, non-eternal things transitively caused by other finite, non-eternal things (i. e., the entities described in propositions like E1p28) are caused by the infinite, eternal substance, given that what follows either directly or indirectly from the divine nature is infinite and eternal (E1p21–23). In “Spinoza’s Monism I,” “Spinoza’s Monism I,” in the previous issue of this journal. I pointed out that most commentators answer this question by invoking entities that are indefinite and (...)
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  23. Spinoza’s ‘Infinite Modes’ Reconsidered.Kristin Primus - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):1-29.
    My two principal aims in this essay are interconnected. One aim is to provide a new interpretation of the ‘infinite modes’ in Spinoza’s Ethics. I argue that for Spinoza, God, conceived as the one infinite and eternal substance, is not to be understood as causing two kinds of modes, some infinite and eternal and the rest finite and non-eternal. That there cannot be such a bifurcation of divine effects is what I take the ‘infinite mode’ propositions, E1p21–23, to establish; E1p21–23 (...)
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  24.  81
    The Soft-Line Solution to Pereboom's Four-Case Argument.Kristin Demetriou - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):595-617.
    Derk Pereboom's Four-Case Argument is among the most famous and resilient manipulation arguments against compatibilism. I contend that its resilience is not a function of the argument's soundness but, rather, the ill-gotten gain from an ambiguity in the description of the causal relations found in the argument's foundational case. I expose this crucial ambiguity and suggest that a dilemma faces anyone hoping to resolve it. After a thorough search for an interpretation which avoids both horns of this dilemma, I conclude (...)
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  25.  49
    Exploringthe Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Employer Attractiveness.Kristin B. Backhaus, Brett A. Stone & Karl Heiner - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (3):292-318.
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  26. Touching The Boundary Mark: Aging, Habit, And Temporality In Beauvoir’s La Vieillesse.Kristin Rodier - 2013 - Janus Head 13 (1):35-57.
    This paper explores the unique phenomenology of habit and temporality put forth in Beauvoir’s La Vieillesse. I situate her understanding of temporality in relation to her early work Pyrrhus and Cinéas. I extract her notion of a boundary marked future that decreases anticipation for the future and thus rigidifies habits. In the final section I appropriate the notion of a boundary mark for a cultural phenomenology where we understand boundary marks as constituted by our understandings of ourselves in time and (...)
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  27.  15
    Letter to the Editor: In Defense of the PolyHeme® Trial.Anne Hamilton Dougherty - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):W35-W37.
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  28. Scientia intuitiva in the Ethics.Kristin Primus - 2017 - In The Critical Guide to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 169-186.
    **For my more recent views of the third kind of cognition, see my "Finding Oneself in God"** -/- Abstract: Cognition of the third kind, or scientia intuitiva, is supposed to secure beatitudo, or virtue itself (E5p42). But what is scientia intuitiva, and how is it different from (and superior to) reason? I suggest a new answer to this old and vexing question at the core of Spinoza’s project in the Ethics. On my view, Spinoza’s scientia intuitiva resembles Descartes’s scientia more (...)
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  29.  46
    Physicians' Duty of Compassion.Charles J. Dougherty & Ruth Purtilo - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):426.
    This is a time of change in American healthcare. Market forces are restructuring local delivery systems around competing managed care networks. Many leading proposals for healthcare reform intend a reshaping of the national healthcare marketplace itself. Periods of change create an opportunity to reassess traditional values and practices. Such reassessments can be used to help insure that current innovations and proposed reforms preserve and strengthen the best in the traditions of medicine. A legitimate focus of concern in the medical and (...)
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  30.  85
    Part V of Spinoza's Ethics: Intuitive knowledge, contentment of mind, and intellectual love of God.Kristin Primus - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (6):e12838.
  31. Aristotle's Four Truth Values.M. V. Dougherty - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):585-609.
  32. (In)compatibilism.Kristin M. Mickelson - 2023 - In Joe Campbell, Kristin M. Mickelson & V. Alan White (eds.), Wiley-Blackwell: A Companion to Free Will. Wiley. pp. 58-83.
    The terms ‘compatibilism’ and ‘incompatibilism’ were introduced in the mid-20th century to name conflicting views about the logical relationship between the thesis of determinism and the thesis that someone has free will. These technical terms were originally introduced within a specific research paradigm, the classical analytic paradigm. This paradigm is now in its final stages of degeneration and few free-will theorists still work within it (i.e. using its methods, granting its substantive background assumptions, etc.). This chapter discusses how the ambiguity (...)
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  33.  83
    Should the Nazi Research Data Be Cited?Kristine Moe - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (6):5-7.
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  34. Reflective Knowledge.Kristin Primus - 2021 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), A Companion to Spinoza. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 265–275.
    This chapter describes Spinoza's obscure “ideas of ideas” doctrine and his claim that “as soon as one knows something, one knows that one knows it, and simultaneously knows that one knows that one knows, and so on, to infinity”. Spinoza holds that the human mind is a representation of the body: the “objectum of the idea constituting the human mind” is the human body. Suppose ideas are essentially self‐reflexive, and that this reflexive awareness, the “idea of the idea,” makes the (...)
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  35. Technology and ethics.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2010 - In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and values: essential readings. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  36.  29
    Agonizing care: care ethics, agonistic feminism and a political theory of care.Kristin G. Cloyes - 2002 - Nursing Inquiry 9 (3):203-214.
    Agonizing care: care ethics, agonistic feminism and a political theory of care ‘Care’ is central to nursing theory and practice, and has been described in a variety of ways. Intense conversations about care have been developing in other fields of study as well, from the social sciences to the humanities. Care ethics has grown out of intellectual exchange between feminist thought, moral theory and the critique of traditional western political philosophy. However, care ethics is not without its critics, as these (...)
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  37.  18
    Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities.Thomas Pogge, Erin Kelly, Elizabeth Anderson, Norman Daniels, Lorella Terzi & Colin M. Macleod (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book brings together a team of leading theorists to address the question 'What is the right measure of justice?' Some contributors, following Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, argue that we should focus on capabilities, or what people are able to do and to be. Others, following John Rawls, argue for focussing on social primary goods, the goods which society produces and which people can use. Still others see both views as incomplete and complementary to one another. Their essays evaluate (...)
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  38.  24
    The Comparative Set Fallacy.M. V. Dougherty - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (2):213-222.
    This paper argues for the validity of inferences that take the form of: A is more X than B; therefore A and B are both X. After considering representative counterexamples, it is claimed that these inferences are valid if and only if the comparative terms in the inference are taken from no more than one comparative set, where a comparative set is understood to be comprised of a positive, comparative, and superlative, represented as {X, more X than, most X}. In (...)
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  39.  6
    Ramos-Zayas, Ana Y.: Parenting Empires. Class, Whiteness, and the Moral Economy of Privilege in Latin America.Maureen E. O’Dougherty - 2021 - Anthropos 116 (2):524-525.
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  40. Machine Ethics.Michael Anderson & Susan Leigh Anderson (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge Univ. Press.
    The essays in this volume represent the first steps by philosophers and artificial intelligence researchers toward explaining why it is necessary to add an ...
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  41.  57
    Staying in the Loop: Relational Agency and Identity in Next-Generation DBS for Psychiatry.Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Darin D. Dougherty & Alik S. Widge - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):59-70.
    In this article, we explore how deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices designed to “close the loop”—to automatically adjust stimulation levels based on computational algorithms—may risk taking the individual agent “out of the loop” of control in areas where (at least apparent) conscious control is a hallmark of our agency. This is of particular concern in the area of psychiatric disorders, where closed-loop DBS is attracting increasing attention as a therapy. Using a relational model of identity and agency, we consider whether (...)
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  42. Do Apes Read Minds?: Toward a New Folk Psychology.Kristin Andrews - 2012 - MIT Press.
    Andrews argues for a pluralistic folk psychology that employs different kinds of practices and different kinds of cognitive tools (including personality trait attribution, stereotype activation, inductive reasoning about past behavior, and ...
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  43.  17
    Feminist Spirituality as Lived Religion: How UK Feminists Forge Religio-spiritual Lives.Kristin Aune - 2015 - Gender and Society 29 (1):122-145.
    How do feminists in the United Kingdom view spirituality and religion? What are their religious and spiritual attitudes, beliefs, and practices? What role do spirituality and religion play in feminists’ lives? This article presents findings from an interview-based study of 30 feminists in England, Scotland, and Wales. It identifies three characteristics of feminists’ approaches to religion and spirituality: They are de-churched, are relational, and emphasize practice. These features warrant a new approach to feminists’ relationships with religion and spirituality. Rather than, (...)
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  44.  42
    We’re not in it for the money—lay people’s moral intuitions on commercial use of ‘their’ biobank.Kristin Solum Steinsbekk, Lars Øystein Ursin, John-Arne Skolbekken & Berge Solberg - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):151-162.
    Great hope has been placed on biobank research as a strategy to improve diagnostics, therapeutics and prevention. It seems to be a common opinion that these goals cannot be reached without the participation of commercial actors. However, commercial use of biobanks is considered morally problematic and the commercialisation of human biological materials is regulated internationally by policy documents, conventions and laws. For instance, the Council of Europe recommends that: “Biological materials should not, as such, give rise to financial gain”. Similarly, (...)
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  45. Free Will, Self‐Creation, and the Paradox of Moral Luck.Kristin M. Mickelson - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):224-256.
    *As mentioned in Peter Coy's NYT essay "When Being Good Is Just a Matter of Being Lucky" (2023) -/- ----- -/- How is the problem of free will related to the problem of moral luck? In this essay, I answer that question and outline a new solution to the paradox of moral luck, the source-paradox solution. This solution both explains why the paradox arises and why moral luck does not exist. To make my case, I highlight a few key connections (...)
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  46. The Harshness Objection: Is Luck Egalitarianism Too Harsh on the Victims of Option Luck?Kristin Voigt - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):389-407.
    According to luck egalitarianism, inequalities are justified if and only if they arise from choices for which it is reasonable to hold agents responsible. This position has been criticised for its purported harshness in responding to the plight of individuals who, through their own choices, end up destitute. This paper aims to assess the Harshness Objection. I put forward a version of the objection that has been qualified to take into account some of the more subtle elements of the luck (...)
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  47. It’s in your nature: a pluralistic folk psychology.Kristin Andrews - 2008 - Synthese 165 (1):13 - 29.
    I suggest a pluralistic account of folk psychology according to which not all predictions or explanations rely on the attribution of mental states, and not all intentional actions are explained by mental states. This view of folk psychology is supported by research in developmental and social psychology. It is well known that people use personality traits to predict behavior. I argue that trait attribution is not shorthand for mental state attributions, since traits are not identical to beliefs or desires, and (...)
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  48. Anti-Realism and Anti-Revisionism in Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Mathematics.Anderson Nakano - 2020 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 97 (3):451-474.
    Since the publication of the Remarks on the Foundations of Mathematics, Wittgenstein’s interpreters have endeavored to reconcile his general constructivist/anti-realist attitude towards mathematics with his confessed anti-revisionary philosophy. In this article, the author revisits the issue and presents a solution. The basic idea consists in exploring the fact that the so-called “non-constructive results” could be interpreted so that they do not appear non-constructive at all. The author substantiates this solution by showing how the translation of mathematical results, given by the (...)
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  49.  91
    Relational Equality and the Expressive Dimension of State Action.Kristin Voigt - 2018 - Social Theory and Practice 44 (3):437-467.
    Expressive theories of state action seek to identify and assess the ‘meaning’ implicit in state action, such as legislation and public policies. In expressive theories developed by relational egalitarians, state action must ‘express’ equal concern and respect for citizens. However, it is unclear how precisely we can determine and assess the meaning of what states do. This paper considers how an expressive theory could be developed, given the commitments of a relational account of equality, and how such a theory would (...)
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  50.  23
    Creating meaningful work in the age of AI: explainable AI, explainability, and why it matters to organizational designers.Kristin Wulff & Hanne Finnestrand - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    In this paper, we contribute to research on enterprise artificial intelligence (AI), specifically to organizations improving the customer experiences and their internal processes through using the type of AI called machine learning (ML). Many organizations are struggling to get enough value from their AI efforts, and part of this is related to the area of explainability. The need for explainability is especially high in what is called black-box ML models, where decisions are made without anyone understanding how an AI reached (...)
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