Results for 'Kuchipudi Dance'

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  1. Mindfulness as a Pedagogical Tool: Kuchipudi Indian Classical Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2015 - Arts in Religious and Theological Studies (ARTS) Journal 1 (27):33-39.
    Contemplative pedagogy is necessary in the dance world because it can be a very dangerous place without it. Dance students who aim to sustain the so-called “right”body image too often develop a physical obsession that leads to dangers like bulimia and anorexia. Moreover, the stresses of performing on stage, combined with other pressures of daily life, may overwhelm dancers to the point where they might feel depressed or even suicidal. Thus, it is vital to develop a pedagogy that (...)
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  2. The Postcolonial Reality of Using the Term " Liturgical " to Describe Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2014 - Journal of Research on Christian Education 2 (23):154-175.
    Homi Bhabha, a postcolonial scholar influenced by the work of Franz Fanon and Edward Said, indicates that identities stimulate a need to negotiate in spaces that result in the remaking of boundaries. There is a call to expose the limitations of the East and the West in an effort to acknowledge the space in-between that interconnects the past traditions and history, with the present and the future. This study applies Homi Bhabha’s theory of hybridity to determine whether the term liturgical (...)
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  3.  2
    Confronting Orientalism: A Self-Study of Educating Through Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2017 - Netherlands: Sense Publishers.
    The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called savages of the land. Postcolonialism is an intellectual (...)
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  4. The Postcolonial Pedagogical Challenge of Creativity.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2017 - Religion and Education 2 (44):1-18.
    Edward Said pointed to the problem of Orientalism that develops when the West creates a fictitious imagined version of Eastern religion and culture. Said’s notion of Orientalism focuses on the general distorted representation of Eastern religion and culture by the West. Homi Bhabha extends Said’s notion of Orientalism to reveal the tension of the inevitable hybridity between the East and the West. Here, cultural practices develop in the space of hybridity with the intention to promote a feeling of coherence as (...)
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  5. The Theological Misappropriation of Christianity as a Civilizing Force.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2017 - Journal of Research on Christian Education 2 (26):79-104.
    The theological misappropriation of Christianity as a civilizing force occurs when individuals convert to Christianity due to deception that ignores the faith-based aspect of Christianity. The history of Western education in India illustrates the hidden curriculum that Christian missionaries employed to disrupt the Indian educational system. This unnerving pedagogy points to the need for a postcolonial theoretical framework that relates the inescapable hybridity of religion and culture where Orientalism has the potential to occur. To press the ongoing urgency of this (...)
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  6.  27
    Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers.Janet Karin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of (...)
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  7. Philosophical Essays on Dance with Responses From Choreographers, Critics and Dancers.Gordon Fancher, Gerald Myers & Connecticut College American Dance Festival - 1981
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  8.  38
    Dancing with Iris: The Philosophy of Iris Marion Young.Ann Ferguson & Mechtild Nagel (eds.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    Dancing with Iris engages with Iris Marion Young's prolific writings in political theory and in phenomenology. Contributors discuss her work from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, political science, human rights law, cultural geography and dance studies.
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  9.  14
    Dancing Intercorporeality: A Health Humanities Perspective on Dance as a Healing Art.Aimie Purser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (2):253-263.
    As a contribution to the burgeoning field of health humanities, this paper seeks to explore the power of dance to mitigate human suffering and reacquaint us with what it means to be human through bringing the embodied practice of dance into dialogue with the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty’s conceptualisation of subjectivity as embodied and of intersubjectivity as intercorporeality frees us from many of the constraints of Cartesian thinking and opens up a new way of (...)
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  10. Dance of the Dialectic: Steps in Marx's Method.Bertell Ollman - 2003 - University of Illinois Press.
     
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  11.  14
    Understanding Dance.Graham Mcfee - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):644-646.
  12.  37
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form of (...)
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  13. Dance Therapy and Depth Psychology: The Moving Imagination.Joan Chodorow - 2015 - Routledge.
    Dance/movement as active imagination was originated by Jung in 1916. Developed in the 1960s by dance therapy pioneer Mary Whitehouse, it is today both an approach to dance therapy as well as a form of active imagination in analysis. In her delightful book Joan Chodorow provides an introduction to the origins, theory and practice of dance/movement as active imagination. Beginning with her own story the author shows how dance/ movement is of value to psychotherapy. An (...)
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  14.  98
    Mind, Dance, and Pedagogy.Jay A. Seitz - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (4):37-42.
    Explores the role of dance education both inside and outside the arts.
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  15.  1
    Dancing Practices: Seeing and Sensing the Moving Body.Susanne Ravn - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (2):57-82.
    This article aims to explore the relation between body and space – specifically how the relation between the embodied awareness of movement and the sense of one’s body-space can be modified and changed deliberately in different kinds of dance practices. Using a multi-sited design, the ethnographical fieldwork, which formed the empirical ground for the study, was from the outset focused on acknowledging the diversity of the dancers’ practices. Each in their own way, the 13 professional dancers involved in the (...)
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  16. The Dance: Essence of Embodiment.Betty Block & Judith Lee Kissell - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (1):5-15.
    An analysis of movement, and particularly of dance,helps us to see in an extraordinarily effective way the meaningof embodiment. This paper then looks through the eyes ofdance theorists and at philosophers who consider dance andmovement and their meaning of embodiment. A study of movementand dance encompasses the fullest meaning of embodiment: that theembodied way of being-in-the-world is also an embedded way ofbeing in a world of others. Dance has critically importantsocial ramifications. In our own and other (...)
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  17.  41
    Dancing Around the Causal Joint: Challenging the Theological Turn in Divine Action Theories.Sarah Lane Ritchie - 2017 - Zygon 52 (2):361-379.
    Recent years have seen a shift in divine action debates. Turning from noninterventionist, incompatibilist causal joint models, representatives of a “theological turn” in divine action have questioned the metaphysical assumptions of approaches seeking indeterministic aspects of nature wherein God might act. Various versions of theistic naturalism offer specific theological frameworks that reimagine the basic God–world relationship. But do these explicitly theological approaches to divine action take scientific knowledge and methodology seriously enough? And do such approaches adequately address the problem of (...)
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  18.  61
    The Dancing Ru: A Confucian Aesthetics of Virtue.Nicholas F. Gier - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):280-305.
    The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, which has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as will be argued, normative as well. It is also proposed that the best way to refound virtue ethics is to return to the Greek concept of technē tou biou, literally "craft of life." The ancients did not distinguish between craft and fine art, and the meaning of technē, even in its Latin form, ars, (...)
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  19.  6
    A Dance Movement Therapy Group for Depressed Adult Patients in a Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic: Effects of the Treatment.Päivi M. Pylvänäinen, Joona S. Muotka & Raimo Lappalainen - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  20. A Dance Between the Reduction and Reflexivity: Explicating the "Phenomenological Psychological Attitude".Linda Finlay - 2008 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (1):1-32.
    This article explores the nature of "the phenomenological attitude," which is understood as the process of retaining a wonder and openness to the world while reflexively restraining pre-understandings, as it applies to psychological research. A brief history identifies key philosphical ideas outlining Husserl's formulation of the reductions and subsequent existential-hermeneutic elaborations, and how these have been applied in empirical psychological research. Then three concrete descriptions of engaging the phenomenological attitude are offered, highlighting the way the epoché of the natural sciences, (...)
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  21.  18
    Dance of the Artificial Alignment and Ethics.Karamjit S. Gill - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):1-4.
  22. Thinking-is-Moving: Dance, Agency, and a Radically Enactive Mind. [REVIEW]Michele Merritt - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):95-110.
    Recently, in cognitive science, the enactivist account of cognition has been gaining ground, due in part to studies of movement in conjunction with thought. The idea, as Noë , has put it, that “cognition is not something happening inside us or to us, but it’s something we do, something we achieve,” is increasingly supported by research on joint attention, movement coordination, and gesture. Not surprisingly, therefore, enactivists have also begun to look at “movement specialists”—dancers—for both scientific and phenomenological accounts of (...)
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  23.  23
    The Dancing.Nicholas F. Gier - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):280-305.
    The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, which has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as will be argued, normative as well. It is also proposed that the best way to refound virtue ethics is to return to the Greek concept of technē tou biou, literally "craft of life." The ancients did not distinguish between craft and fine art, and the meaning of technē, even in its Latin form, ars, (...)
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  24.  13
    Dancing in Time.Aili Bresnahan - 2017 - In Ian Phillips (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Temporal Experience. New York, NY, USA: pp. 339-348.
    This chapter will analyze the experience and, in particular the conscious experience, of dancing in time from the perspective of the trained dancer while performing. The focus is thus on the experience and consciousness of a dancer who is moving her body in time rather than on the experience of a seated audience member or dance appreciator who is watching a dancer move. The question of how temporality is experienced in dance by the appreciator will therefore not be (...)
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  25.  8
    Dance, Music, Meter and Groove: A Forgotten Partnership.W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  26.  2
    Dancing or Fitness Sport? The Effects of Two Training Programs on Hippocampal Plasticity and Balance Abilities in Healthy Seniors.Kathrin Rehfeld, Patrick Müller, Norman Aye, Marlen Schmicker, Milos Dordevic, Jörn Kaufmann, Anita Hökelmann & Notger G. Müller - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  27.  89
    Afro-Latin Dance as Reconstructive Gestural Discourse: The Figuration Philosophy of Dance on Salsa.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Research in Dance Education 22:1-15.
    The Afro-Latin dance known as ‘salsa’ is a fusion of multiple dances from West Africa, Muslim Spain, enslaved communities in the Caribbean, and the United States. In part due to its global origins, salsa was pivotal in the development of the Figuration philosophy of dance, and for ‘dancing with,’ the theoretical method for social justice derived therefrom. In the present article, I apply the completed theory Figuration exclusively to salsa for the first time, after situating the latter in (...)
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  28.  26
    The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy.Thomas M. Norton-Smith - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An American Indian well-made actual world (...)
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  29. The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW]Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In (...)
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  30.  5
    The Phenomenology of Dance.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 1966 - Books for Libraries.
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  31. Improvisational Artistry in Live Dance Performance as Embodied and Extended Agency.Aili Bresnahan - 2014 - Dance Research Journal 46 (1):84-94.
    This paper provides an account of improvisational artistry in live dance performance that construes the contribution of the dance performer as a kind of agency. Andy Clark’s theory of the embodied and extended mind is used in order to consider how this account is supported by research on how a thinking-while-doing person navigates the world. I claim here that while a dance performer’s improvisational artistry does include embodied and extended features that occur outside of the brain and (...)
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  32.  97
    Dancing with DNA and Flirting with the Ghost of Lamarck.Mary Jane West-Eberhard - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):439-451.
  33.  11
    Dancing Your Moves Away: How Memory Retrieval Shapes Complex Motor Action.Tobias Tempel, Igor Loran & Christian Frings - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 21 (3):300-312.
  34.  30
    Dancing Around the Issues: Prospects for an Empirically Grounded Philosophy of Dance.David Davies - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):195-202.
  35. From Movement to Dance.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):39-57.
    This article begins with a summary phenomenological analysis of movement in conjunction with the question of “quality” in movement. It then specifies the particular kind of memory involved in a dancer’s memorization of a dance. On the basis of the phenomenological analysis and specification of memory, it proceeds to a clarification of meaning in dance. Taking its clue from the preceding sections, the concluding section of the article sets forth reasons why present-day cognitive science is unable to provide (...)
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  36. Dancing with Pixies: Strong Artificial Intelligence and Panpsychism.John Mark Bishop - 2002 - In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. pp. 360-379.
    The argument presented in this paper is not a direct attack or defence of the Chinese Room Argument (CRA), but relates to the premise at its heart, that syntax is not sufficient for semantics, via the closely associated propositions that semantics is not intrinsic to syntax and that syntax is not intrinsic to physics. However, in contrast to the CRA’s critique of the link between syntax and semantics, this paper will explore the associated link between syntax and physics. The main (...)
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  37.  1
    Dance Your PhD: Embodied Animations, Body Experiments, and the Affective Entanglements of Life Science Research.Natasha Myers - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (1):151-189.
    In 2008 Science Magazine and the American Academy for the Advancement of Science hosted the first ever Dance Your PhD Contest in Vienna, Austria. Calls for submission to the second, third, and fourth annual Dance Your PhD contests followed suit, attracting hundreds of entries and featuring scientists based in the US, Canada, Australia, Europe and the UK. These contests have drawn significant media attention. While much of the commentary has focused on the novelty of dancing scientists and the (...)
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  38.  9
    Dancing Between Embodied Empathy and Phenomenological Reflection.Linda Finlay - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology: Methodology: Special Edition 6:p - 1.
    In phenomenological research, layered understandings emerge from a complex process of experiencing and reflection, engaged in by both researcher and participant. Researcher and participant engage in a dance, moving in and out of experiencing and reflection while simultaneously moving through a shared intersubjective space that is the research encounter. If researchers are to empathise - imaginatively project themselves into participants' experience - they need to be open to this intersubjective space. First, I describe and reflect upon two particular moments (...)
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  39.  31
    The Dance Form of the Eyes: What Cognitive Science Can Learn From Art.Ralph D. Ellis - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
    Art perception offers action affordances for the self-generated movement of the eyes, the mind, and the emotions; thus some scenes are ’easy to look at', and evoke different kinds of moods depending on what kind of affordances they present for the eyes, the brain, and the action schemas that further the dynamical self-organizing patterns of activity toward which the organism tends, as reflected in its ongoing emotional life. Art can do this only because perception is active rather than passive, and (...)
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  40.  41
    The Aesthetics of Electronic Dance Music, Part I: History, Genre, Scenes, Identity, Blackness.Nick Wiltsher - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):415-425.
    Electronic dance music has much about it to interest philosophers. In this article, I explore facets of dance music cultures, using the issue of authenticity as a framing question. The problem of sorting real or authentic dance music from mainstream or commercial clubbing can be treated as a matter of history and genre-definition; as a matter of defining scenes or subcultures; and as a matter of blackness. In each case, electronic dance music, and critical discourse surrounding (...)
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  41.  40
    Dancing to the Antinomy: A Proposal for Transcendental Idealism.Carl Posy - 1983 - American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (1):81 - 94.
  42.  86
    Choreographing the Borderline: Dancing with Kristeva.Joshua M. Hall - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (1):49-58.
    In this paper I will investigate Kristeva’s conception of dance in regard to the trope of the borderline. I will begin with her explicit treatments of dance, the earliest of which occurs in Revolution in Poetic Language, in terms of (a) her analogy between poetry and dance as practices erupting on the border of chora and society, (b) her presentation of dance as a phenomenon bordering art and religion in rituals, and (c) her brief remarks on (...)
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  43. Dancing in the Dark: Evolutionary Psychology and the Argument From Design.Karola Stotz & Paul E. Griffiths - 2001 - In Steven Scher & Frederick Rauscher (eds.), Evolutionary Psychology: Alternative Approaches. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 135--160.
    The Narrow Evolutionary Psychology Movement represents itself as a major reorientation of the social/behavioral sciences, a group of sciences previously dominated by something called the ‘Standard Social Science Model’. Narrow Evolutionary Psychology alleges that the SSSM treated the mind, and particularly those aspects of the mind that exhibit cultural variation, as devoid of any marks of its evolutionary history. Adherents of Narrow Evolutionary Psychology often suggest that the SSSM owed more to ideology than to evidence. It was the child of (...)
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  44.  1
    Dance, Philosophy, and Somaesthetics.Eric Mullis - 2016 - Performance Philosophy 2 (1):60-71.
    This essay examines the question whether dance can do philosophy by considering the manner in which dance processes used in the studio can advance philosophical investigations of human embodiment. Two contemporary improvisation techniques are discussed, Gaga technique developed by Ohad Naharin and Contact Improvisation developed by Steve Paxton.
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  45.  23
    Sharing the Dance – on the Reciprocity of Movement in the Case of Elite Sports Dancers.Jing He & Susanne Ravn - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):99-116.
    In his recent works on daily face-to-face encounters, Zahavi claims that the phenomenon of sharing involves reciprocity. Following Zahavi’s line of thought, we wonder what exactly reciprocity amounts to and how the shared experience emerges from the dynamic process of interaction. By turning to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two (...)
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  46.  21
    Greek Dance.J. W. Fitton - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (2):254-274.
    Many books have been written on Greek dance. The fault which bedevils a large number of them is that their authors have tried to recreate the movements of the dances from the artistic evidence without taking into account the conventions of Greek vase-painting and sculpture. Other books, and they are the most useful, set out the literary and the artistic evidence without attempting to reconstruct the dances. Rarely, however, are the wider implications considered, and it is these which I (...)
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  47.  17
    Abstracting Dance: Detaching Ourselves From the Habitual Perception of the Moving Body.Vered Aviv - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  48. How Marking in Dance Constitutes Thinking with the Body.David Kirsh - 2011 - The External Mind:183-214.
    In dance, there is a practice called ‘marking’. When dancers mark, they execute a dance phrase in a simplified, schematic or abstracted form. Based on our interviews with professional dancers in the classical, modern, and contemporary traditions, it is fair to assume that most dancers mark in the normal course of rehearsal and practice. When marking, dancers use their body-in-motion to represent some aspect of the full-out phrase they are thinking about. Their stated reason for marking is that (...)
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  49. Dance Techne: Kinetic Bodily Logos and Thinking in Movement.Jaana Parviainen - 2003 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics (27-28):159-175.
  50.  7
    Dancing Souls.Ermanno Bencivenga - 2002 - Lexington Books.
    In Dancing Souls Bencivenga addresses the crucial question of how the subject can be one and multiple at the same time. He finds that this phenomenon is like the disciplined movement of the dancer through space. Bencivenga explores the structure of this ontological betweenness in its various levels of complexity from the most intimately personal to the communal and the political.
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