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  1.  39
    Producing Pronouns and Definite Noun Phrases: Do Speakers Use the Addressee’s Discourse Model?Kumiko Fukumura & Roger P. G. van Gompel - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1289-1311.
    We report two experiments that investigated the widely held assumption that speakers use the addressee’s discourse model when choosing referring expressions (e.g., Ariel, 1990; Chafe, 1994; Givón, 1983; Prince, 1985), by manipulating whether the addressee could hear the immediately preceding linguistic context. Experiment 1 showed that speakers increased pronoun use (and decreased noun phrase use) when the referent was mentioned in the immediately preceding sentence compared to when it was not, even though the addressee did not hear the preceding sentence, (...)
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  2.  6
    The Crosslinguistic Acquisition of Sentence Structure: Computational Modeling and Grammaticality Judgments From Adult and Child Speakers of English, Japanese, Hindi, Hebrew and K'iche'.Ben Ambridge, Tomoko Tatsumi, Laura Doherty, Ramya Maitreyee, Colin Bannard, Soumitra Samanta, Stewart McCauley, Inbal Arnon, Shira Zicherman, Dani Bekman, Amir Efrati, Ruth Berman, Bhuvana Narasimhan, Dipti Misra Sharma, Rukmini Bhaya Nair, Kumiko Fukumura, Seth Campbell, Clifton Pye, Pedro Mateo Pedro, Sindy Fabiola Can Pixabaj, Mario Marroquín Pelíz & Margarita Julajuj Mendoza - 2020 - Cognition 202:104310.
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    Interface of Linguistic and Visual Information During Audience Design.Kumiko Fukumura - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1419-1433.
    Evidence suggests that speakers can take account of the addressee's needs when referring. However, what representations drive the speaker's audience design has been less clear. This study aims to go beyond previous studies by investigating the interplay between the visual and linguistic context during audience design. Speakers repeated subordinate descriptions given in the prior linguistic context less and used basic-level descriptions more when the addressee did not hear the linguistic context than when s/he did. But crucially, this effect happened only (...)
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