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Kunimasa Sato
CUNY Graduate Center
  1.  23
    A Sensitivity to Good Questions: A Virtue-Based Approach to Questioning.Kunimasa Sato - 2016 - Episteme 13 (3):329-341.
    This paper argues for a virtue-based account of questioning. First, it delineates the unreflective yet rational aspects of questioning and demonstrates that questions can be obtained not only in reflective but also in unreflective processes. This paper then argues that the unreflective yet rational mode of inquirers in questioning can be characterized by an automatic response to good questions and cues for relevant doubt and further questions, the active and standby modes of responsiveness, and emotional stress on cues for relevant (...)
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  2.  21
    Education’s Epistemology: Rationality, Diversity, and Critical Thinking. By Harvey Siegel. Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. Xiv. + 296. [REVIEW]Kunimasa Sato - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (1-2):190-194.
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  3.  25
    Sensitizing Reasons by Emulating Exemplars.Kunimasa Sato - 2015 - Informal Logic 35 (2):204-220.
    The fostering of rationality has long been endorsed as an educational ideal by some philosophers; in recent years, whereas some have argued for this ideal, others have challenged it, particularly within debates relevant to the study of critical thinking. Harvey Siegel, who has spelled out the philosophical theory of educating for rationality, not only has defended his view from such challenges but also has been deepening his thoughts regarding how rationality can be fostered. This paper centers on the cultivating of (...)
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  4.  47
    Good Learning and Epistemic Transformation.Kunimasa Sato - forthcoming - Episteme:1-14.
    This study explores a liberatory epistemic virtue that is suitable for good learning as a form of liberating socially situated epistemic agents toward ideal virtuousness. First, I demonstrate that the weak neutralization of epistemically bad stereotypes is an end of good learning. Second, I argue that weak neutralization represents a liberatory epistemic virtue, the value of which derives from liberating us as socially situated learners from epistemic blindness to epistemic freedom. Third, I explicate two distinct forms of epistemic transformation: constitutive (...)
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