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kurtis hagen [20]Kurtis G. Hagen [2]Kurtis George Hagen [1]
  1.  46
    Conspiracy Theories and the Paranoid Style: Do Conspiracy Theories Posit Implausibly Vast and Evil Conspiracies?Kurtis Hagen - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (1):24-40.
    In the social science literature, conspiracy theories are commonly characterized as theories positing a vast network of evil and preternaturally effective conspirators, and they are often treated, either explicitly or implicitly, as dubious on this basis. This characterization is based on Richard Hofstadter’s famous account of ‘the paranoid style’. However, many significant conspiracy theories do not have any of the relevant qualities. Thus, the social science literature provides a distorted account of the general category ‘conspiracy theory’, conflating it with a (...)
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  2. Conspiracy Theorists and Social Scientists.Kurtis Hagen - 2018 - In M. R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 125-140.
    Presumably authoritative sources, such as social scientists who study conspiracy theorists, are generally expected to be logically rigorous, intellectually honest, and unbiased. This chapter suggests that this expectation may not always be justified. Specifically, it exposes a number of significant problems in an attempt by a group of social scientists to defend the (ostensibly) scientific study of conspiracy theorists. First, they misrepresent their own previously stated intentions. Second, they misrepresent a critique of those intentions. Third, they fail completely in their (...)
     
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  3.  15
    Is Conspiracy Theorizing Really Epistemically Problematic?Kurtis Hagen - forthcoming - Episteme:1-23.
    In an article based on a recent address to the Royal Institute of Philosophy, Keith Harris has argued that there is something epistemically wrong with conspiracy theorizing. Although he finds “standard criticisms” of conspiracy theories wanting, he argues that there are three subtle but significant problems with conspiracy theorizing: It relies on an invalid probabilistic version of modus tollens. It involves a problematic combination of both epistemic virtues and vices. And it lacks an adequate basis for trust in its information (...)
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  4.  21
    Should Academics Debunk Conspiracy Theories?Kurtis Hagen - 2020 - Social Epistemology 34 (5):423-439.
    This article addresses the question, ‘Should scholars debunk conspiracy theories or stay neutral?’ It describes ‘conspiracy theories’ and two senses of ‘neutrality,’ arguing that scholars should be...
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  5.  55
    The Propriety of Confucius: A Sense-of-Ritual.Kurtis Hagen - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (1):1 – 25.
    In the philosophy of Confucius, the concept _li_ is both central and elusive. While it is often translated 'ritual' or 'the rites,' I argue that there are numerous significant ways in which _li_ is as much an internal property of individuals as it is an external set of rules or norms. I discuss _li_ as deference, as developed dispositions, as embodied intelligence, and as personalized exemplary conduct. Finally, reflecting on the work of Fingarette, and Hall and Ames, as well as (...)
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  6.  37
    Is Infiltration of “Extremist Groups” Justified?Kurtis Hagen - 2010 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):153-168.
    Many intellectuals scoff at what they call “conspiracy theories.” But two Harvard law professors, Cass Sunstein (now working for the Obama administration) and Adrian Vermeule, go further. They argue in the Journal of Political Philosophy that groups that espouse such theories ought to be infiltrated and undermined by government agents and allies. While some may find this proposal appalling (as indeed we all should), others may find the argument plausible, especially if they have been swayed by the notion that conspiracy (...)
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  7.  39
    Conspiracy Theories and Stylized Facts.Kurtis Hagen - 2011 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 21 (2):3-22.
    In an article published in the Journal of Political Philosophy, Cass Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule argue that the government and its allies ought to activelyundermine groups that espouse conspiracy theories deemed “demonstrably false.” They propose infiltrating such groups in order to “cure” conspiracy theorists by treating their “crippled epistemology” with “cognitive diversity.” They base their proposal on an analysis of the “causes” of such conspiracy theories, which emphasizes informational and reputational cascades. Some may regard their proposal as outrageous and anti-democratic. (...)
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  8.  44
    Xunzi's Use of Zhengming: Naming as a Constructive Project.Kurtis Hagen - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (1):35 – 51.
    This paper challenges the view of several interpreters of Xunzi regarding the status of names, ming. I will maintain that Xunzi's view is consistent with the activity we see not only in his own efforts to influence language, but those of Confucius as well. Based on a reconsideration of translations and interpretations of key passages, I will argue that names are regarded neither as mere labels nor as indicating a privileged taxonomy of the myriad phenomena. Rather, Xunzi conceives them as (...)
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  9.  53
    Xunzi and the Prudence of Dao : Desire as the Motive to Become Good.Kurtis Hagen - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):53-70.
    Xunzi is often interpreted as offering a method for transforming our desires. This essay argues that, strictly speaking, he does not. Rather, Xunzi offers a method of developing an auxiliary motivational structure capable of overpowering our original desires, when there is a conflict. When one succeeds in transforming one’s overall character, original desires nevertheless remain and are largely satisfied. This explains why one may be motivated to follow the way even before one has developed noble intentions. On Xunzi’s view, following (...)
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  10.  38
    The Concepts of Li and Lei in the Xunzi: Constructive Patterning of Categories.Kurtis Hagen - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):183-197.
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  11.  43
    Artifice and Virtue in the Xunzi.Kurtis Hagen - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):85-107.
    Xunzi was chronologically the third of the three great Confucian thinkers of China’s classical period, after Confucius and Mencius. Having produced the most comprehensive philosophical system of that period, he occupies a place in the development of Chinese philosophy comparable to that of Aristotle in the Western philosophical tradition. This essay reveals how Xunzi’s understanding of virtue and moral development dovetailed with his positions on ritual propriety, the attunement of names, the relation betweenli (patterns) andlei (categories), and his view ofdao (...)
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  12.  27
    Sorai and Xunzi on the Construction of the Way.Kurtis Hagen - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (2):117 – 141.
    While Sorai's intellectual debt to Xunzi is often mentioned, the similarities between their views have not often been explored at length in English2.2 Further, while Maruyama Masao does compare the two thinkers in his influential monograph Studies in the Intellectual History of Tokugawa Japan, he stresses (apparent) differences between Xunzi and Sorai, in order to hail Sorai's uniqueness. Without meaning to take anything away from Sorai as an independent thinker, I maintain that with regard to precisely those views for which (...)
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  13. Review Of David Ray Griffin's Cognitive Infiltration: An Obama Appointee's Plan To Undermine The 9/11 Conspiracy Theory. [REVIEW]Kurtis Hagen - 2011 - Florida Philosophical Review 11 (1):66-68.
     
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  14.  36
    Review of Virtue, Nature, and Moral Agency in the Xunzi by T. C. Kline III; Philip J. Ivanhoe. [REVIEW]Kurtis Hagen - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):434-440.
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  15.  14
    Sorai and the Will Oftian.Kurtis Hagen - 2006 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):313-330.
    My purpose has been more negative than positive. That is, I have challenged the view that Sorai understoodtian as an intentional agent. At minimum, Sorai’s philosophical views do not depend upon such a conception oftian, and he refrains from characterizingtian in such terms when he discusses the concept oftian directly. However, I do not claim to have proven that Sorai’s view oftian was completely naturalistic, or even that Sorai did not—at some level—believe thattian had intentions. I have, I hope, shown (...)
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  16.  18
    A Critical Review of Ivanhoe on Xunzi.kurtis hagen - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (3):361–373.
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  17.  22
    Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi Ed. By T. C. Kline III and Justin Tiwald.Kurtis Hagen - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):676-678.
    As the title Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi accurately suggests, this collection of essays edited by T. C. Kline III and Justin Tiwald addresses Xunzi’s perspective on ritual and religion. Some of the essays are new, others are have been published previously. As a whole, the book strives to portray Xunzi as a religious philosopher, and to elucidate his potential contribution to the understanding of religion and ritual. Although there are a variety of views presented, Xunzi is generally characterized (...)
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  18.  9
    A Chinese Critique on Western Ways of Warfare.Kurtis Hagen - 1996 - Asian Philosophy 6 (3):207 – 217.
    Abstract I will argue that there are two pervasive and enduring Western attitudes towards warfare: one involves the romanticism of violent conflict, the other concerns moral justification for it. These stand in sharp contrast to the traditional Chinese attitude as put forward in the Chinese classic treatises on warfare, the Sun?tzu and Sun Pin. I will reference similar concerns articulated in the Taoist and, to a lesser extent, Confucian classics both to confirm and clarify this position. Using the combination of (...)
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  19.  28
    A Response to Eric Hutton’s Review.Kurtis Hagen - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):441-443.
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  20.  14
    Bai, Tongdong, China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom: New York: Zed Books, 2012, Viii+206 Pages. [REVIEW]Kurtis G. Hagen - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):545-549.
  21.  7
    Would Early Confucians Really Support Humanitarian Interventions?Kurtis G. Hagen - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):818-841.
    Many scholars view Confucianism as relatively open to war, as a legitimate tool for maintaining order and rescuing oppressed peoples. Indeed, it is not uncommon for statements such as the following to be presented as though they were straightforward matters of fact: “Confucians would approve the use of force by one state against another state for the protection against abusive rule in the latter if properly carried out”.1 Such claims find support in the work of Daniel A. Bell, Tongdong Bai, (...)
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  22.  14
    Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy.Steve Coutinho & Kurtis Hagen (eds.) - 2018 - Peterborough, Canada: Broadview Press.
    An anthology of new translations of essential readings from the classical texts of early Chinese philosophy. It includes the Analects of Confucius, Meng Zi (Mencius), Xun Zi, Mo Zi, Lao Zi (Dao De Jing), Zhuang Zi, and Han Fei Zi, as well as short chapters on the Da Xue and the Zhong Yong. Pedagogically organized, it offers philosophically sophisticated annotations and commentaries as well as an extensive glossary explaining key philosophical concepts in detail.
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