Results for 'Kyle Nash'

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  1.  5
    Social Media Approval Reduces Emotional Arousal for People High in Narcissism: Electrophysiological Evidence.Kyle Nash, Andre Johansson & Kumar Yogeeswaran - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  2.  7
    The Effects of Social Power and Apology on Victims’ Posttransgression Responses.C. Ward Struthers, Careen H. Khoury, Curtis E. Phills, Elizabeth van Monsjou, Joshua R. Guilfoyle, Kyle Nash, Vitali Golenitski & Carol Summers - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 25 (1):100-116.
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  3. Marian Santos-Nash: What is a Mother?Stephanie Marie Santos Nash - 2010 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 14 (2 & 3):355-356.
     
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  4. John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology.Richard Nash - 1991 - Southern Illinois University.
    First published in Latin in 1699, John Craige’s _Theology _represents a rare early attempt to introduce mathematical reasoning into moral and theological dispute. Craige’s effort to determine the earliest possible date of the Apocalypse earned him ridicule as an eccentric and a crank. Yet, Richard Nash argues, the intensity of the response to Craige’s work testifies to how widely felt the conflict was between the old and newly emergent notions of probability.
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  5. How Are Thick Terms Evaluative?Brent G. Kyle - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13:1-20.
    Ethicists are typically willing to grant that thick terms (e.g. ‘courageous’ and ‘murder’) are somehow associated with evaluations. But they tend to disagree about what exactly this relationship is. Does a thick term’s evaluation come by way of its semantic content? Or is the evaluation pragmatically associated with the thick term (e.g. via conversational implicature)? In this paper, I argue that thick terms are semantically associated with evaluations. In particular, I argue that many thick concepts (if not all) conceptually entail (...)
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  6.  25
    New Evidence on the Role of the Media in Corporate Social Responsibility.Ajay Patel, Robert Nash, Omrane Guedhami & Sadok El Ghoul - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):1051-1079.
    Prior research suggests that the media plays an important information intermediary role in capital markets. We investigate the role of the media in influencing firms’ engagement in corporate social responsibility activities. Using a large sample of 4396 unique firms from 42 countries over the period 2003–2012, we find strong evidence that firms engage in more CSR activities if located in countries where the media has more freedom. This relation is robust to using various proxies for media freedom, an alternative source (...)
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  7. Thick Concepts.Brent G. Kyle - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A term expresses a thick concept if it expresses a specific evaluative concept that is also substantially descriptive. It is a matter of debate how this rough account should be unpacked, but examples can help to convey the basic idea. Thick concepts are often illustrated with virtue concepts like courageous and generous, action concepts like murder and betray, epistemic concepts like dogmatic and wise, and aesthetic concepts like gaudy and brilliant. These concepts seem to be evaluative, unlike purely descriptive concepts (...)
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  8. Courage, Cowardice, and Maher’s Misstep.Brent G. Kyle - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):565-587.
    Could a Nazi soldier or terrorist be courageous? The Courage Problem asks us to answer this sort of question, and then to explain why people are reluctant to give this answer. The present paper sheds new light on the Courage Problem by examining a controversy sparked by Bill Maher, who claimed that the 9/11 terrorists’ acts were ‘not cowardly.’ It is shown that Maher's controversy is fundamentally related to the Courage Problem. Then, a unified solution to both problems is provided. (...)
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  9.  36
    Avoiding Empty Rhetoric: Engaging Publics in Debates About Nanotechnologies.Renee Kyle & Susan Dodds - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):81-96.
    Despite the amount of public investment in nanotechnology ventures in the developed world, research shows that there is little public awareness about nanotechnology, and public knowledge is very limited. This is concerning given that nanotechnology has been heralded as ‘revolutionising’ the way we live. In this paper, we articulate why public engagement in debates about nanotechnology is important, drawing on literature on public engagement and science policy debate and deliberation about public policy development. We also explore the significance of timing (...)
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  10. Hiddenness, Holiness, and Impurity.Brent G. Kyle - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (2):239-259.
    John Schellenberg has advanced the hiddenness argument against God’s existence, based on the idea that an all-loving God would seek personal relationships. This article develops a reply to Schellenberg’s argument by examining the notion of moral impurity, as understood by Paul the Apostle. Paul conceptualized moral impurity as a causal state that transfers from person to person, like a contagious disease. He also believed that moral impurity precludes divine–human relationship. The goal of this article is to develop these ideas into (...)
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  11. Knowledge as a Thick Concept: Explaining Why the Gettier Problem Arises.Brent G. Kyle - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (1):1-27.
    The Gettier problem has stymied epistemologists. But, whether or not this problem is resolvable, we still must face an important question: Why does the Gettier problem arise in the first place? So far, philosophers have seen it as either a problem peculiar to the concept of knowledge, or else an instance of a general problem about conceptual analysis. But I would like to steer a middle course. I argue that the Gettier problem arises because knowledge is a thick concept, and (...)
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  12. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
     
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  13. The New and Old Ignorance Puzzles: How Badly Do We Need Closure?Brent G. Kyle - 2015 - Synthese 192 (5):1495-1525.
    Skeptical puzzles and arguments often employ knowledge-closure principles . Epistemologists widely believe that an adequate reply to the skeptic should explain why her reasoning is appealing albeit misleading; but it’s unclear what would explain the appeal of the skeptic’s closure principle, if not for its truth. In this paper, I aim to challenge the widespread commitment to knowledge-closure. But I proceed by first examining a new puzzle about failing to know—what I call the New Ignorance Puzzle . This puzzle resembles (...)
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  14. Review of 'The Lewd, the Rude, and the Nasty: A Study of Thick Concepts in Ethics' by Pekka Väyrynen. [REVIEW]Brent G. Kyle - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):576-582.
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  15.  83
    Cognitive Theories of Emotion.Ronald Alan Nash - 1989 - Noûs 23 (4):481-504.
  16.  63
    Financial Interests of Authors in Scientific Journals: A Pilot Study of 14 Publications.Sheldon Krimsky, L. S. Rothenberg, P. Stott & G. Kyle - 1996 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):395-410.
    Disclosure of financial interests in scientific research is the centerpiece of the new conflict of interest regulations issued by the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Science Foundation that became effective October 1, 1995. Several scientific journals have also established financial disclosure requirements for contributors. This paper measures the frequency of selected financial interests held among authors of certain types of scientific publications and assesses disclosure practices of authors. We examined 1105 university authors (first and last cited) from Massachusetts (...)
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  17. Policies and Persons a Casebook in Business Ethics.John Bowers Matthews, Kenneth E. Goodpaster & Laura L. Nash - 1985
     
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  18.  35
    Review of 'Thick Evaluation' by Simon Kirchin. [REVIEW]Brent G. Kyle - forthcoming - Mind:fzy055.
    Review of Thick Evaluation, by KirchinSimon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. xi + 198.
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  19. Toward a Shared Decision: Against the Fiction of the Autonomous Individual.Ryan R. Nash - 2015 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Family-Oriented Informed Consent. Springer Verlag.
  20.  14
    What is Real and What is Realism in Sociology?Roy Nash - 1999 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (4):445–466.
    In the physical sciences a realist ontology rests on our ability to demonstrate the actual and real nature of material entities. Realist metaphysics of social entities, most influentially Bhaskar's critical realism, attempt to provide a related philosophical foundation for the social sciences. This paper examines the central issue of what is real about society it concludes that social relations and the organisations they constitute do exist and discusses the conditions of their demonstration. Realist interpretations of Bourdieu's theories are given particular (...)
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  21.  23
    H. T. Engelhardt, Jr., Misrepresented and Misunderstood: Beyond a Philosophy of Difference and Toward a Theology of Unity. [REVIEW]R. R. Nash - 2014 - Christian Bioethics 20 (2):272-282.
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  22.  16
    Using Anonymized Reflection To Teach Ethics: A Pilot Study.Gaye Kyle - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (1):6-16.
    Anonymized reflection was employed as an innovative way of teaching ethics in order to enhance students' ability in ethical decision making during a `Care of the Dying Patient and Family' module. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected from the first two student cohorts who experienced anonymized reflection ( n = 24). The themes identified were the richness and relevance of scenarios, small-group work and a team approach to teaching. Students indicated that they preferred this style of teaching. This finding (...)
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  23. Punishing and Atoning: A New Critique of Penal Substitution.Brent G. Kyle - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):201-218.
    The doctrine of penal substitution claims that it was good (or required) for God to punish in response to human sin, and that Christ received this punishment in our stead. I argue that this doctrine’s central factual claim—that Christ was punished by God—is mistaken. In order to punish someone, one must at least believe the recipient is responsible for an offense. But God surely did not believe the innocent Christ was responsible for an offense, let alone the offense of human (...)
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  24.  21
    Ordinary Knowledge and Philosophical Demonstration of God's Existence.Peter W. Nash - 1954 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 28:55.
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  25. The Dialectical Tradition in South Africa.Andrew Nash - 2015 - Routledge.
    This book brings into view the most enduring and distinctive philosophical current in South African history—one often obscured or patronized as Afrikaner liberalism. It traces this current of thought from nineteenth-century disputes over Dutch liberal theology through Stellenbosch existentialism to the prison writings of Breyten Breytenbach, and examines related themes in the work of Olive Schreiner, M. K. Gandhi, and Richard Turner. At the core of this tradition is a defence of free speech in its classical sense, as a virtue (...)
     
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  26.  6
    Informing Consent for Organ Donation.Courtney Thiele & Ryan Nash - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (3):187-191.
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  27.  31
    The Relation Between Phonological Awareness and Working Memory.J. Oakhill & F. Kyle - 2000 - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 75 (2):152-164.
  28.  10
    On Closure in Economics.Stephen John Nash - 2004 - Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (1):75-89.
    While attempting to avoid closure, it can be argued that two of the analytical techniques employed by Lawson (1997) strongly imply closure. First, while ostensibly directed at liberating analysis from all forms of closure, the demi?reg is shown to effectively rely on implied closure. Second, when the use of control groups is compared to Mäki's method of isolation, it can be shown that Lawson implies substantially similar closure to that which is proposed by Mäki. Such implied forms of closure generally (...)
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  29. Narrative in Culture: The Uses of Storytelling in the Sciences, Philosophy and Literature.Cristopher Nash (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  30.  15
    Narrative Ethics, Authentic Integrity, and an Intrapersonal Medical Encounter in David Foster Wallace’s “Luckily the Account Representative Knew CPR”.Woods Nash - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):96-106.
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  31.  26
    The Politics of Framing: An Interview with Nancy Fraser.Kate Nash & Vikki Bell - 2009 - In Nancy Fraser (ed.), Theory, Culture and Society. Columbia University Press. pp. 73-86.
  32.  24
    Equality of Educational Opportunity: In Defence of a Traditional Concept.Roy Nash - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (4):361–377.
  33. Epistemicism and the Problem of Arbitrariness for Vagueness.Christopher D. Kyle - 2012 - Dialogue: Journal of Phi Sigma Tau 55 (1).
    This paper distinguishes between epistemic and metaphysical problems of arbitrariness for vagueness. It argues that epistemicism can resolve the epistemic problem of arbitrariness but not the metaphysical one.
     
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  34. Why Business Ethics Now.Laura L. Nash - forthcoming - Managing Business Ethics.
     
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  35.  69
    Post-Democracy, Politics and Philosophy: An Interview with Jacques Ranci Re.Kate Nash - 1996 - Angelaki 1 (3):171 – 178.
  36.  4
    Transnationalizing the Public Sphere.K. Nash - 2007 - Theory, Culture and Society 24 (4):53-57.
  37. The Dialectical Tradition in South Africa.Andrew Nash - 2009 - Routledge.
    This book brings into view the most enduring and distinctive philosophical current in South African history—one often obscured or patronized as Afrikaner liberalism. It traces this current of thought from nineteenth-century disputes over Dutch liberal theology through Stellenbosch existentialism to the prison writings of Breyten Breytenbach, and examines related themes in the work of Olive Schreiner, M. K. Gandhi, and Richard Turner. At the core of this tradition is a defence of free speech in its classical sense, as a virtue (...)
     
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  38.  27
    Cosmopolitan Political Community: Why Does It Feel So Right?Kate Nash - 2003 - Constellations 10 (4):506-518.
  39.  24
    Book Review: Sex and Harm in the Age of Consent, by Joseph J. Fischel. [REVIEW]Jennifer C. Nash - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (3):503-506.
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  40.  17
    Intensive Care for Everyone’s Least Favorite Oxymoron: Narrative in Business Ethics.Laura L. Nash - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):277-290.
    It had to happen. After two full decades of intense energy, business ethicists and business practitioners may actually have succeeded in suppressing the feeblest joke of the profession: “Business Ethics. Isn’t that an oxymoron?” Har har har.In the early days of business ethics, the oxymoron had actual embodiments. “Business” was represented by hard-nosed, thicks-kinnedmanagers with no inclination to adopt academia’s language and critiques. “Ethics” was embodied by ivory-towered theoreticians with an undisguised contempt for profit makers. What a joke to think (...)
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  41.  7
    Doctors and Nurses Once More--An Alternative to May.P. Nash - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):82-83.
    It is argued that promissory obligation arising from the contract of employment offers a simpler and less contentious explanation and justification of the doctor-nurse relationship at work, than does May's proposal of second-order reasons. The second-order reason position is rejected as the norm for that relationship, and in the exceptional case, where it is admitted, shared employee status is identified as primary validator of a doctor as locus of rational authority. Finally, a brief case is made for a more precise (...)
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  42.  18
    Intensive Care for Everyone’s Least Favorite Oxymoron: Narrative in Business Ethics.Laura L. Nash - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):277-290.
    It had to happen. After two full decades of intense energy, business ethicists and business practitioners may actually have succeeded in suppressing the feeblest joke of the profession: “Business Ethics. Isn’t that an oxymoron?” Har har har.In the early days of business ethics, the oxymoron had actual embodiments. “Business” was represented by hard-nosed, thicks-kinnedmanagers with no inclination to adopt academia’s language and critiques. “Ethics” was embodied by ivory-towered theoreticians with an undisguised contempt for profit makers. What a joke to think (...)
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  43.  19
    In Defense of “Targeting” Some Dissent About Science.Erin J. Nash - 2018 - Perspectives on Science 26 (3):325-359.
    That we have recently transitioned into a post-truth political era is a common refrain. But the influence of false, inaccurate, and misleading claims on politics in western liberal democracies isn't novel. In their book, Merchants of Doubt, Oreskes and Conway expose the "Tobacco Strategy": the methods various actors have deployed, increasingly since the mid-twentieth century, to obscure the truth about scientific issues from the public, induce widespread ignorance and unwarranted doubt, and stall public responses to issues that can have significant (...)
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  44. Milicianas and Homefront Heroines: Images of War and Revolution 1936-39'.Mary Nash - 1989 - History of European Ideas 11.
     
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  45.  11
    After Orientalism: Critical Perspectives on Western Agency and Eastern Re-Appropriations Edited by François Pouillion and Jean-Claude Vatin.Geoffrey Nash - 2019 - Journal of Islamic Studies 30 (1):134-137.
    After Orientalism: Critical Perspectives on Western Agency and Eastern Re-appropriations Edited by PouillionFrançois and VatinJean-Claude, xiii + 289 pp. Price PB £48.00. EAN 978–9004282520.
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  46. The Theoretical and Historical Case for Democratic Education in the United States.Ken Kyle & Charles Jenks - 2002 - Educational Studies 33 (2):150-169.
     
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  47.  8
    The Origin of Dalton's Chemical Atomic Theory.Leonard K. Nash - 1956 - Isis 47 (2):101-116.
  48. The Nature of the Natural Sciences.Leonard Kollender Nash - 1963 - Boston: Little, Brown.
     
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  49.  29
    Thinking Political Sociology: Beyond the Limits of Post-Marxism.Kate Nash - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):97-114.
    This article is concerned with post-Marxism and materialism in the work of Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe. As `post-Marxists' these writers use `material' in a variety of ways, all of which indicate limits and constraints. The article focuses on one version of `materialism' in this work, a version that is more implied than elaborated, in which `material' is equivalent to institutionalized performativity or sedimented discourse: to `objective' social structures and institutions. Post-Marxists often use `the social' as equivalent to (...)
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  50. The Light of the Mind: St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge.Ronald H. Nash - 1969 - [Lexington]University Press of Kentucky.
     
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