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Laÿna Droz [8]Laurence Droz [2]L. Droz [1]
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Laÿna Droz
Kyoto University (PhD)
  1.  8
    The Concept of Milieu in Environmental Ethics, Individual Responsibility Within and Interconnected World.Layna Droz - 2021 - Routledge.
    The Concept of Milieu in Environmental Ethics discusses how we can come together to address current environmental problems at the planetary level, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, transborder pollution and desertification. -/- The book recognises the embedded individual sociocultural and environmental contexts that impact our everyday choices. It asks, in this pluralism of worldviews, how can we build common ground to tackle environmental issues? What is our individual moral responsibility within the larger collaborative challenge? Through philosophical reasoning, this book (...)
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  2. Watsuji’s Idea of the Self and the Problem of Spatial Distance in Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2018 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 3:145-168.
    Watsuji proposes a conception of the self as embodied and dynamic in constant cyclic relationship with the historical milieu. I argue that the concept of a relational individual can provide some solutions to the problem in environmental ethics of the spatial distance between an agent and the consequences of her actions. Indeed, by becoming aware of the interdependent relation between the self and the local shared milieu, one develops and recognizes feelings of care and belonging, which promote more environmentally sensitive (...)
     
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  3.  3
    Redefining Sustainability: From Self-Determination to Environmental Autonomy.Laÿna Droz - 2019 - Philosophies 4 (3):42-0.
    “Sustainability” is widely used by diverse organizations as the normative direction to coordinate common actions. But what should we sustain or maintain? Through philosophical reasoning and a literature review in environmental ethics, this paper explores this question and develops a working definition of “sustainability” that intends to be compatible with the global diversity of worldviews. I argue that sustainability is the maintenance of the conditions of possibility of continuation of self-determining flourishing human existences. It entails maintaining the natural processes of (...)
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  4.  5
    Anthropocentrism as the Scapegoat of the Environmental Crisis: A Review.L. Droz - 2022 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 22:25-49.
    Anthropocentrism has been claimed to be the root of the global environmental crisis. Based on a multidisciplinary and multilingual literature review, this article proposes a conceptual analysis of ‘anthropocentrism’ and reconstructs the often implicit argument that links anthropocentrism to the environmental crisis. The variety of usages of the concept of ‘anthropocentrism’ described in this article reveals many underlying disagreements under the apparent unanimity of the calls to reject anthropocentrism, both regarding what exactly is the root of the problem, and the (...)
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  5.  3
    What Ethical Responsibilities Emerge From Our Relation with the Milieu?Laÿna Droz - 2020 - In Human and Nature, Research Reports from Turku University of Applied Sciences 50. Turku, Finland: pp. 15-30.
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  6. Echofacies Interpretation of Pleistocene to Holocene Contourites on the Demerara Plateau and Abyssal Plain.Cédric Tallobre, Lies Loncke, Laurence Droz, Tania Marsset, Mirjam Uusõue, Walter R. Roest, Anne-Sophie Fanget, Maria-Angela Bassetti, Pierre Giresse & Germain Bayon - 2021 - Interpretation 9 (2):SB49-SB65.
    Off French Guiana and Suriname, North Atlantic Deep Water and Antarctic Bottom Water oceanic currents contour the Demerara marginal plateau, which promotes the formation of contourites. We have studied these contourites thanks to a new compilation of high-resolution subbottom profiles calibrated by sedimentary cores. The echofacies and isopach maps that we constructed highlight a sedimentary distribution parallel to the isobaths. The presence of moats along the slope is confirmed by the observation of parallel, elongated, sedimentary depleted zones and echofacies strongly (...)
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  7.  11
    Tetsuro Watsuji’s Milieu and Intergenerational Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):37-51.
    The concept of humans as relational individuals living in a milieu can provide some solutions to various obstacles of theorization that are standing in the way of an ethics of sustainability. The idea of a milieu was developed by Tetsuro Watsuji as a web of signification and symbols. It refers to the environment as lived by a subjective relational human being and not as artificially objectified. The milieu can neither be separated from its temporal—or historical—dimension as it is directly related (...)
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  8.  9
    Environmental Individual Responsibility for Accumulated Consequences.Laÿna Droz - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):111-125.
    Climate change and many environmental problems are caused by the accumulated effects of repeated actions by multiple individuals. Instead of relying on collective responsibility, I argue for a non-atomistic individual responsibility towards such environmental problems, encompassing omissions, ways of life, and consequences mediated by other agents. I suggest that the degree of causal responsibility of the agent must be balanced with the degree of capacity-responsibility determined by the availability of doable alternatives. Then, the more an agent has powers as a (...)
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  9.  3
    To: “Echofacies Interpretation of Pleistocene to Holocene Contourites on the Demerara Plateau and Abyssal Plain,” Cédric Tallobre, Lies Loncke, Laurence Droz, Tania Marsset, Mirjam Uusõue, Walter R. Roest, Anne-Sophie Fanget, Maria-Angela Bassetti, Pierre Giresse, and Germain Bayon, Interpretation, 9, No. 2, SB48–SB65, Doi: 10.1190/INT-2020-0159.1. [REVIEW]Cédric Tallobre, Lies Loncke, Laurence Droz, Tania Marsset, Mirjam Uusõue, Walter R. Roest, Anne-Sophie Fanget, Maria-Angela Bassetti, Pierre Giresse & Germain Bayon - 2021 - Interpretation 9 (3):Y3-Y3.
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  10.  2
    Distribution of Responsibility for Climate Change Within the Milieu.Laÿna Droz - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (62):62.
    This article approaches the challenges of the distribution of responsibility for climate change on a local level using the framework of the milieu. It suggests that the framework of the milieu, inspired by Japanese and cross-cultural environmental philosophy, provides pathways to address the four challenges of climate change. The framework of the milieu clarifies the interrelations between the individual, the community, and the local milieu and is open to a conservative view of human communities and an inclusive view of multispecies (...)
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  11.  2
    Environmental Individual Responsibility for Accumulated Consequences.Laÿna Droz - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):111-125.
    Climate change and many environmental problems are caused by the accumulated effects of repeated actions by multiple individuals. Instead of relying on collective responsibility, I argue for a non-atomistic individual responsibility towards such environmental problems, encompassing omissions, ways of life, and consequences mediated by other agents. I suggest that the degree of causal responsibility of the agent must be balanced with the degree of capacity-responsibility determined by the availability of doable alternatives. Then, the more an agent has powers as a (...)
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