9 found
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L. John [3]L. Orrock John [1]Luiz John [1]L. Locke John [1]
Leo John [1]Lindsay C. H. John [1]L. McClure John [1]L. Bradshaw John [1]

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Profile: Lara John
Profile: Livina John (UND)
  1.  20
    John L. Locke & Barry Bogin (2006). Life History and Language: Selection in Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):301-311.
    Language, like other human traits, could only have evolved during one or more stages of development. We enlist the theoretical framework of human life history to account for certain aspects of linguistic evolution, with special reference to initial phases in the process. It is hypothesized that selection operated at several developmental stages, the earlier ones producing new behaviors that were reinforced by additional, and possibly more powerful, forms of selection during later stages, especially adolescence and early adulthood. Peer commentaries have (...)
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  2.  13
    John L. Orrock (2006). Useful Distraction: Ritualized Behavior as an Opportunity for Recalibration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):625-626.
    Responding to potential hazards is likely to require precaution-related recalibration, the extensive integration of complex variables related to inferred risk and fitness. By swamping working memory with goal-demoted actions and focusing recalibration on the inferred threat, ritualized behaviors may serve to increase the efficacy of precaution-related recalibration. This benefit may be an important mechanism maintaining non-pathological ritualized behavior. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  3.  10
    Ester I. Klimkeit & John L. Bradshaw (2006). Heritable Mental Disorders: You Can't Choose Your Relatives, but It is They Who May Really Count. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):415.
    Keller & Miller (K&M) briefly mention and promptly dismiss the idea that genes for harmful mental disorders may confer certain advantages to affected individuals. However, the authors fail to consider that the same genes (in low doses or reduced penetrance) may be adaptive for relatives, and that this may in part explain why they are retained in the gene pool. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  4.  31
    Lindsay C. H. John (2012). Apollo, Sudden Death, and Homer's "Odyssey": A Warning From the Past That We May Be Unable to Eradicate Coronary Artery Disease. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (2):230-235.
  5. L. John (forthcoming). Austin. Ifs and Cans. Proceedings of the British Academy.
     
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  6.  23
    Pollock † & L. John (2011). Defeasible Reasoning and Degrees of Justification. Argument and Computation 1 (1):7-22.
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  7. J. Hilton Denis, L. McClure John & R. Slugoski Ben (2005). The Course of Events: Counterfactuals, Causal Sequences and Explanation. In David R. Mandel, Denis J. Hilton & Patrizia Catellani (eds.), The Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking. Routledge.
     
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  8. L. John (2002). Causal Probability. Synthese 132 (1-2):1-2.
     
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  9. Fedderke Johannes, de Kadt Raphael & Luiz John (1999). Economic Growth and Social Capital: A Critical Refection. Theory and Society 28 (5):109-745.
     
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