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Michael Harrington
Duquesne University
  1.  30
    Recent Attempts to Define a Dionysian Political Theory.L. Michael Harrington - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4):639-660.
    The Dionysian corpus makes virtually no statement about the authority of kings or the structure of nations, but it has nevertheless repeatedly been the subjectof political analysis. Several scholars have recently sketched out a Dionysian politics by drawing analogies between the Dionysian church and the city, and between the Dionysian bishop and the emperor. These analogies are of limited usefulness. They show that Dionysius does employ Platonic political language to describe the ecclesiastical hierarchy, but they risk overlooking or downplaying the (...)
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  2.  23
    The Argument for Universal Immortality in Eriugena’s “Zoology”.L. Michael Harrington - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):611-633.
    Apparently alone among medieval Christians, Eriugena argues that all life is immortal. He relies on Plato’s Timaeus as his primary source for this claim, but he modifies the argument of the Timaeus considerably. He turns Plato’s cosmic soul into the genus of life, thereby taking a treatise that originally dealt with cosmology and using it to explore the ontological significance of definition. All species that fall under the genus of life must be immortal, because a mortal species would contradict the (...)
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  3.  16
    Logic, Theology, and Poetry in Boethius, Abelard, and Alan of Lille: Words in the Absence of Things. [REVIEW]L. Michael Harrington - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):886-887.
  4.  27
    Clement of Alexandria. [REVIEW]L. Michael Harrington - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):326-327.
  5. A Thirteenth-Century Textbook of Mystical Theology at the University of Paris.L. Michael Harrington - 2004 - Leuven: Peeters Press.
    The luminaries of late thirteenth-century Europe took great interest in the mysterious fifth-century author known as Dionysius the Areopagite. They typically read Dionysius not in the original Greek, but in a Latin edition prepared sometime in the middle of the thirteenth century. This edition, which appeared first in Paris and later circulated all over Western Europe, was no mere translation. In addition to the famous translation made by Eriugena in the ninth century, it contained translations of scholia on the Dionysian (...)
     
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  6. On the Ecclesiastical Hierarchy: The Thirteenth-Century Textbook Edition.L. Michael Harrington - 2011 - Leuven: Peeters Press.
    The medieval fascination with the mysterious language of Dionysius the Areopagite is nowhere more evident than in the thirteenth-century textbook edition of his treatise on liturgical rites. Dionysius employed unfamiliar Greek to describe people, actions, and texts that would have been perfectly familiar to his readers. The Latin translation used in the thirteenth-century textbook strives to preserve this unfamiliarity, but commentaries are introduced between its lines and paragraphs, disrupting its ability to bewilder and surprise. These commentaries make the Dionysian text (...)
     
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  7.  14
    Sacred Place in Early Medieval Neoplatonism.L. Michael Harrington - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The twentieth century discovered the concept of sacred place largely through the work of Martin Heidegger and Mircea Eliade. Their writings on sacred place respond to the modern manipulation of nature and secularization of space, and so may seem distinctively postmodern, but their work has an important and unacknowledged precedent in the Neoplatonism of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Sacred Place in Early Medieval Neoplatonism traces the appearance and development of sacred place in the writings of Neoplatonists from (...)
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  8. The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes.Cheng Yi, Robin R. Wang & L. Michael Harrington - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    This book is a translation of a key commentary on the Book of Changes, or Yijing, perhaps the most broadly influential text of classical China. The Yijing first appeared as a divination text in Zhou-dynasty China and later became a work of cosmology, philosophy, and political theory as commentators supplied it with new meanings. While many English translations of the Yijing itself exist, none are paired with a historical commentary as thorough and methodical as that written by the Confucian scholar (...)
     
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