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L. A. Moritz [17]L. Moritz [5]
  1.  32
    A Latin Botanical Lexicon Jacques André: Lexique des termes de botanique en latin. (Études et Commentaires, 23.) Pp. 343. Paris: Klincksieck, 1956. Paper, 3,000 fr. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (02):142-145.
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  2.  16
    Ἄλφιτα—a Note.L. A. Moritz - 1949 - Classical Quarterly 43 (3-4):113-.
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  3.  27
    Pliny on Stones D. E. Eichholz: Pliny, Natural History. With an English Translation. Vol. X (Books Xxxvi–Xxxvii). (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Xviii + 344. London: Heinemann, 1962. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (02):173-175.
  4.  19
    Pliny on Stones.L. A. Moritz - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (02):173-.
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  5.  17
    Malaria, Magic, and Mackerel.L. A. Moritz - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (02):167-.
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  6.  16
    Pliny, N.H. Xviii. 85.L. A. Moritz - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (3-4):246-247.
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  7.  15
    Malaria, Magic, and Mackerel W. H. S. Jones: Pliny, Natural History. With an English Translation. Vol. Viii (Books Xxviii–Xxxii). (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Viii+596. London: Heinemann, 1963. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (02):167-169.
  8.  6
    Grain-Mills and Flour in Classical Antiquity.L. A. Moritz - 1960 - Philosophy of Science 27 (3):311-312.
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  9.  19
    Vitruvius' Water-Mill.L. A. Moritz - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (3-4):193-196.
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  10.  8
    Corn.L. A. Moritz - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):135-.
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  11.  7
    ‘Corn’.L. Moritz - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):135-141.
    In this country and in those with which we are best acquainted, that large part of the human diet which is derived from grain is mainly eaten in the form of bread. Bread, in order to be palatable and digestible, must be leavened; and this means that the dough must be able to retain some of the carbon dioxide gas produced in it by the agency of yeast or some similar substance. Its capacity for doing this depends upon the presence (...)
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  12.  7
    Notes & Correspondence.Arthur Koestler, Giorgio de Santillana, Stillman Drake, L. Moritz & N. Jasny - 1960 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 51:73-84.
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  13.  3
    Ἄλφιτα—a Note.L. Moritz - 1949 - Classical Quarterly 43 (3-4):113-117.
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  14.  3
    Husked and ‘Naked’ Grain.L. Moritz - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):129-134.
    When classical scholars use the term ‘spelt’ to translate such words as and in Greek, and far, odor, semen, arinca, and the like in Latin, they seldom realize that all these words denote grains which are nowadays included in the genus wheat. Within this genus a distinction is made between ‘husked’ and ‘naked’ species: naked wheat can be ‘threshed out’ on the threshing-floor, the grain being separated from the chaff and left ready for milling; husked wheat has before milling to (...)
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  15.  8
    Husked and 'Naked' Grain.L. A. Moritz - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):129-.
    When classical scholars use the term ‘spelt’ to translate such words as and in Greek, and far, odor, semen , arinca, and the like in Latin, they seldom realize that all these words denote grains which are nowadays included in the genus wheat. Within this genus a distinction is made between ‘husked’ and ‘naked’ species: naked wheat can be ‘threshed out’ on the threshing-floor, the grain being separated from the chaff and left ready for milling; husked wheat has before milling (...)
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  16.  2
    A Latin Botanical Lexicon. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (2):142-145.
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  17.  3
    Some 'Central' Thoughts on Horace's Odes.L. A. Moritz - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (01):116-.
    As we read these lines we are inevitably reminded of the old adage ab love principium, . Horace here conforms to the ancient precept, as many other poets, at least since Pindar, had done before him. But in his works as a whole, and in the first collection of Odes as a whole, he begins not with Jupiter but with his patron Maecenas.3 Perhaps, therefore, Horace's own practice may help to justify the division of this Horatian article into two separate (...)
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  18.  1
    Notes & Correspondence.Arthur Koestler, Giorgio de Santillana, Stillman Drake, L. A. Moritz, N. Jasny, Frank M. Albrecht, P. H. Brans, James D. Mack & Roy G. Neville - 1960 - Isis 51 (1):73-84.
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  19. Humanitas.L. A. Moritz - 1962 - Cardiff, University of Wales Press.
  20. Malaria, Magic, and Mackerel. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (2):167-169.
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  21. Pliny on Stones. [REVIEW]L. A. Moritz - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (2):173-175.
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  22. Some ‘Central’ Thoughts on Horace's Odes.L. Moritz - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (1):116-131.
    As we read these lines we are inevitably reminded of the old adage ab love principium,. Horace here conforms to the ancient precept, as many other poets, at least since Pindar, had done before him. But in his works as a whole, and in the first collection of Odes as a whole, he begins not with Jupiter but with his patron Maecenas.3 Perhaps, therefore, Horace's own practice may help to justify the division of this Horatian article into two separate but (...)
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