Results for 'L. T. L. T.'

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  1.  61
    Peirce's Theory of Signs.T. L. Short - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, T. L. Short corrects widespread misconceptions of Peirce's theory of signs and demonstrates its relevance to contemporary analytic philosophy of language, mind and (...)science. Peirce's theory of mind, naturalistic but nonreductive, bears on debates of Fodor and Millikan, among others. His theory of inquiry avoids foundationalism and subjectivism, while his account of reference anticipated views of Kripke and Putnam. Peirce's realism falls between 'internal' and 'metaphysical' realism and is more satisfactory than either. His pragmatism is not verificationism; rather, it identifies meaning with potential growth of knowledge. Short distinguishes Peirce's mature theory of signs from his better-known but paradoxical early theory. He develops the mature theory systematically on the basis of Peirce's phenomenological categories and concept of final causation. The latter is distinguished from recent and similar views, such as Brandon's, and is shown to be grounded in forms of explanation adopted in modern science. (shrink)
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  2. The Greatest Happiness Principle*: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1991 - Utilitas 3 (1):37-51.
    My purpose in what follows is not so much to defend the basic principle of utilitarianism as to indicate the form of it which seems most promising (...)
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  3. Santayana.T. L. S. Sprigge (ed.) - 1995 - Routledge.
    This classic study of Santayana was the first book to appear in the _Arguments of the Philosophers_ series. Growing interest in the work of this important American (...)
     
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  4.  33
    Refined and Crass Supernaturalism: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:105-125.
    In the postscript to The Varieties of Religious Experience William James distinguishes two types of belief in the supernatural, conceived as an essential component in religion, crass (...)
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  5.  19
    George Santayana: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:115-133.
    It would be pleasant to start with a paradox. Santayana was an American philosopher, but he was not an American, and he was not a philosopher. The (...)
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  6. Charles Peirce and Modern Science.T. L. Short - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
     
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  7. The Rational Foundations of Ethics.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1990 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1988, this landmark study develops its own positive account of the nature and foundations of moral judgement, while at the same time serving as (...)
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  8. NUNN, T. P. -The Aim and Achievements of Scientific Method[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1908 - Mind 17:274.
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  9.  23
    Utilitarianism and Idealism: A Rapprochement: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1985 - Philosophy 60:447.
    Utilitarian ethics and metaphysical idealism, especially of a Bradleyan sort, are not usually thought of as natural allies. Yet when one considers that it is a crucial (...)
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  10. The Relation Between Jeremy Bentham's Psychological, and His Ethical, Hedonism: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (3):296-319.
    The relationship between Bentham'senunciative principleand hiscensorial principleis famously problematic. The problem's solution is that each person has an overwhelming interest in living (...) in a community in which they, like others, are liable to punishment for behaviour condemned by the censorial principle either by the institutions of the state or by the tribunal of public opinion. The senses in which Bentham did and did not think everyone selfish are examined, and a less problematic form of psychological hedonism than Bentham's is proposed. (shrink)
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  11.  24
    Is the Esse of Intrinsic Value Percipi?: Pleasure, Pain and Value: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 2000 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 47:119-140.
    In this paper I shall speak sympathetically of a hedonistic theory of intrinsic value which, ignoring any other such theories, I shall simply call the hedonistic theory (...)
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  12. A. J. Ayer: An Appreciation: T. L. S. Sprigge.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):1-11.
    As the editor noted in the last number Freddie Ayer, or Professor Sir Alfred Ayer, played a considerable part in launching the vast enterprise of the Bentham (...)
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  13.  25
    David Savan's Peirce Studies.T. L. Short - 1986 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 22 (2):89 - 124.
  14. GREGOR, A. -Leitfaden der Experimentellen Psychopathologie[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1913 - Mind 22:143.
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  15. MARSHALL, H. R. -Consciousness[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1911 - Mind 20:126.
  16. SEGOND, J. -La Prière: Essai de Psychologie Religieuse[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1913 - Mind 22:590.
     
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  17. WOLFF, E. -Francis Bacon Und Seine Quellen. Erster Band: Bacon Und Die Griechische Philosophie[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1911 - Mind 20:134.
     
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  18.  16
    Mr. T. W. Allen on Agar's Homerica.T. L. Agar - 1910 - Classical Quarterly 4 (01):58-.
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  19.  14
    An Inclusive, Online Delphi Process for Setting Targets for Best Practice Implementation for Spinal Cord Injury.Dalton L. Wolfe, Jane T. C. Hsieh, Anna Kras-Dupuis, Richard J. Riopelle, Saagar Walia, Stacey Guy & Katie Gillis - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (2):290-299.
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  20. Behavior and its Causes: Philosophical Foundations of Operant Psychology.T. L. Smith - 1994 - Springer Verlag.
    The rise of cognitive science in the 1960s was widely heralded as a scientific revolution -- an interpretation that implied the decline and eventual death of behavioral psychology (...). Although many forms of behavioral psychology did indeed disappear, there was a striking exception: the program of operant psychology founded by B.F. Skinner. This program actually grew at a rapid pace during the `cognitive revolution' and shows no signs of fading away. What, then, is its place within psychology, and in particular, what is its relationship with cognitive psychology? This book attempts to answer that question. Distinguishing between operant psychology and the philosophy of radical behaviorism, it concludes that even though radical behaviorism may have been a failure, the operant program of research has been a success. Furthermore, operant psychology and cognitive psychology complement one another, each having its own domain within which it contributes something valuable to, but beyond the reach of, the other. (shrink)
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  21.  19
    The New Liberalism of L. T. Hobhouse and the Reenvisioning of Nineteenth-Century Utilitarianism.David Weinstein - 1996 - Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (3):487.
  22. Ethical Theory and Business.T. L. Beauchamp & N. E. Bowie - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):846-880.
     
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  23.  39
    T. W. Allen's Odyssey[REVIEW]T. L. Agar - 1909 - The Classical Review 23 (2):50-53.
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  24.  28
    T. W. Allen's Odyssey[REVIEW]T. L. Agar - 1918 - The Classical Review 32 (7-8):184-185.
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  25.  63
    Methods and Principles in Biomedical Ethics.T. L. Beauchamp - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (5):269-274.
    The four principles approach to medical ethics plus specification is used in this paper. Specification is defined as a process of reducing the indeterminateness of general norms (...)
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  26.  16
    Διήφυσε.T. L. Agar - 1897 - The Classical Review 11 (09):445-447.
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  27.  56
    The God of Metaphysics.T. L. S. Sprigge - 2006 - Clarendon Press.
    Can philosophy offer reasonable grounds for the existence of a God possessing genuine religious significance and not proposed simply as the solution to a purely intellectual philosophical (...)
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  28.  96
    Markets and the Needy: Organ Sales or Aid?T. L. Zutlevics - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):297–302.
  29. Income and Quality of Life: Does the Love of Money Make a Difference?T. L. P. Tang - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):375-393.
    This paper examines a model of income and quality of life that controls the love of money, job satisfaction, gender, and marital status and treats employment status (...)
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  30.  2
    Logic, Language, and Meaning, Volume 2: Intensional Logic and Logical Grammar.L. T. F. Gamut - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    Although the two volumes of _Logic, Language, and Meaning _can be used independently of one another, together they provide a comprehensive overview of modern logic as it (...)
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  31.  31
    9 The Development of Peirce's Theory of Signs.T. L. Short - 2004 - In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Peirce. Cambridge University Press. pp. 214.
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  32. The Works of Archimedes.T. L. Heath - 1955 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (20):355-356.
     
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  33. A Utilitarian Reply to Dr. McCloskey.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1965 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 8 (1-4):264 – 291.
    A theory of punishment should tell us not only when punishment is permissible but also when it is a duty. It is not clear whether McCloskey's (...)retributivism is supposed to do this. His arguments against utilitarianism consist largely in examples of punishments unacceptable to the common moral consciousness but supposedly approved of by the consistent utilitarian. We remain unpersuaded to abandon our utilitarianism. The examples are often fanciful in character, a point which (pace McCloskey) does rob them of much of their force. If there was no tension between utilitarian precepts and those which come naturally to plain men, utilitarianism could have no claim to provide a critique of moralities. The utilitarian's attitude to such tensions is somewhat complicated, but what is certain is that there is more room in his system for the sentiments to which McCloskey appeals against him than McCloskey realizes. We agree with McCloskey, however, on the absurdity of substituting rule?utilitarianism for act?utilitarianism as an answer to his attacks. The distinction itself may represent a conceptual confusion. In our view, indeed, unmodified act?utilitarianism provides the best moral basis for thought about punishment. (shrink)
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  34. The Rational Foundations of Ethics.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (247):113-114.
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  35.  81
    Darwin's Concept of Final Cause: Neither New nor Trivial[REVIEW]T. L. Short - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):323-340.
    Darwin'suse of final cause accords with the Aristotelian idea of finalcauses as explanatory typesas opposed to mechanical causes, which arealways particulars. In Wright's consequence (...)etiology, anadaptation is explained by particular events, namely, its past consequences;hence, that etiology is mechanistic at bottom. This justifies Ghiselin'scharge that such versions of teleology trivialize the subject, But a purelymechanistic explanation of an adaptation allows it to appear coincidental.Patterns of outcome, whether biological or thermodynamic, cannot be explainedbytracing causal chains, even were that possible. They are explicanda of aspecialkind. The form of their explanation, in statistical mechanics or by naturalselection, is not captured by statistical variants of the covering-law model orrelated models of explanation. In them as in classical teleology, types ofoutcome are cited to explain why there are outcomes of those types. But onlywhen types are explanatory by being selected for, as inexplanations of animal and human behavior as well as in Darwin's theory ofnatural selection, but not in statistical mechanics, is the explanationteleological. Darwin's theory is nontrivially teleological. (shrink)
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  36. The 'Four Principles' Approach to Health Care Ethics.T. L. Beauchamp - 2007 - In Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.), Principles of Health Care Ethics. Wiley.
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  37. The Definition of Euthanasia.T. L. Beauchamp & A. I. Davidson - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (3):294-312.
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  38.  20
    Life Among the Legisigns.T. L. Short - 1982 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 18 (4):285 - 310.
  39.  65
    A Morally Deep World: An Essay on Moral Significance and Environmental Ethics.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):378.
    Lawrence Johnson advocates a major change in our attitude toward the nonhuman world. He argues that nonhuman animals, and ecosystems themselves, are morally significant beings with interests (...)
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  40.  15
    Review: T.L.S. Sprigge,The Rational Foundations of Ethics[REVIEW]Mark T. Nelson - 1989 - Philosophical Books 30 (1):49-51.
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  41.  29
    Darwin's Use of the Analogy Between Artificial and Natural Selection.L. T. Evans - 1984 - Journal of the History of Biology 17 (1):113-140.
    The central role played by Darwin's analogy between selection under domestication and that under nature has been adequately appreciated, but I have indicated how important the (...)domesticated organisms also were to other elements of Darwin's theory of evolution-his recognition ofthe constant principle of change,” for instance, of the imperfection of adaptation, and of the extent of variation in nature. The further development of his theory and its presentation to the public likewise hinged on frequent reference to domesticates.We have seen that Darwin's reliance on the analogy between domesticated varieties and wild species was a bold and original step, in light of contemporary views on the nature of domesticates. However, as Darwin undoubtedly foresaw, his reliance on the analogy created difficulties as well as solving problems, and these began with his Malthusian codiscoverer of the principle of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace. Wallace's paperOn the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type,” presented to the Linnean Scoiety along with the first public unveiling of Darwin's theory, states: We see, then, that no inferences as to varieties in a state of nature can be deduced from the observation of those occurring among domestic animals. The two are so much opposed to each other in every circumstance of their existence, that what applies to the one is almost sure not to apply to the other. Domestic animals are abnormal, irregular, artificial; they are subject to varieties which never occur and never can occur in a state of nature.62Much has been made of the similarity of views of Darwin and Wallace, but this quotation surely reveals how utterly different their views were on what to Darwin was an important matter. Several critics of the Origin saw Darwin's reliance on the domesticates as his Achilles heel. As Young has pointed out, Samuel Wilberforce included the following passage in his attack on the Origin: Nor must we pass over unnoticed the transference of the argument from the domesticated to the untamed animals. Assuming that man as the selector can do much in a limited time, Mr. Darwin argues that Nature, a more powerful, a more continuous power, working over vastly extended ranges of time, can do more. But why should Nature, so uniform and persistent in all her operations, tend in this instance to change? Why should she become a selector of varieties?63Another critic, Fleeming Jenkin, found the analogy a weakness in Darwin's theory because of the limited extent of variation in any one direction in domestic animals and plants.64 We have already seen that Darwin had confided a similar view to his notebook thirty years earlier, but changed his mind as a result of his profound study of domesticates. De Beer's reference toan English country gentleman's knowledge of domestic plants and animals and their breeding65 fails totally to recognize the originality and depth of Darwin's knowledge of domesticates.Why did Darwin, against the currents of his time, rely so heavily on mankind's experience with domesticated organisms to shape his theory about species in nature? On reason is that only with domesticates was an approach that came close to experimental verification possible. Darwin fully realized the inadequacies of the experiment, as is emphasized by his repeated contrasting of selection under nature and selection by man. Yet the extensive experience and data of plant and animal breeders offered the only reliable base against which Darwin could continually challenge his views. As he wrote in the introduction to Variation, with domestication, “man ... may be said to have been trying an experiment on a gigantic scale.”66 Given Darwin's high opinion of the quantitative work of Malthus and Quetelet (as emphasized by Schweber),67 and his unremitting efforts to secure data by which to test his theories, it was inevitable that he should attach high significance to domesticated varieties. John Tyndall, in his Belfast address of 1874, said: “The strength of the doctrine of Evolution consists, not in experimental demonstration (for the subject is hardly accessible to this mode of proof), but in its general harmony with scientific thought.”68 Darwin would have agreed with the latter thought, but I think he would have challenged the preceding one on the grounds that long experience with domesticated varieties did provide an element of experimental demonstration. It gave him confidence in his theory, and he used his vast knowledge of artificial selection boldly and creatively. (shrink)
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  42. Diophantos of Alexandria: A Study in the History of Greek Algebra.T. L. Heath - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Greek mathematician Diophantos of Alexandria lived during the third century CE. Apart from his age, very little else is known about his life. Even the exact (...)
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  43.  23
    Semeiosis and Intentionality.T. L. Short - 1981 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (3):197 - 223.
  44.  16
    T.L.O. and the Student's Right to Privacy.Jeffery L. Johnson & Donald W. Crowley - 1986 - Educational Theory 36 (3):211-224.
  45. The Right to Health and the Right to Health Care.T. L. Beauchamp & R. R. Faden - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):118-131.
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  46.  43
    T.L.S. Sprigge, The Importance of Subjectivity: Selected Essays in Metaphysics and Ethics, Ed. B. McHenry Leemon. Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2010, Xi + 356 Pp., £47. ISBN: 978-0-19-959154-1[REVIEW]Stephen R. L. Clark - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (2):310-315.
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  47. Informed Consent. History.T. L. Beauchamp & R. R. Faden - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
     
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  48.  17
    The Puzzle of Experience.T. L. S. Sprigge - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):125-127.
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  49.  4
    Mechanism of High Velocity Electromagnetic Deformation of AlMg Alloy.Q. Chen, X. T. Han, J. W. Wu, Q. L. Cao, L. T. Huang, L. Liu & L. Li - 2017 - Philosophical Magazine 97 (1):69-83.
  50.  73
    Thinking Through Confucius.David L. Hall & Roger T. Ames - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):241-254.
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