Results for 'Labor Market Institutions'

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  1.  9
    The Political Economy of Labour Market Institutions.Gilles Saint-Paul - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book looks at why labour market institutions such as those evident in continental Europe - more specifically, employment protection, unemployment benefits, and relative wage rigidities - exist, what role they play in society, why they seem so persistent, where the pressure to reform them comes from, and whether reform can be politically viable or not. It studies the economic conditions under which we expect a given set of institutions to arise and remain stable, and provides theoretical (...)
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  2.  52
    Volenti Non Fit Iniuria? Contract Freedom and Labor Market Institutions.Richard Sturn - 2009 - Analyse & Kritik 31 (1):81-99.
    Various writers point out that accepting the terms of a contract does not imply consent to the background conditions of this contract. This is an important critical insight allowing for a critical perspective on the principle of free contract, according to which the state should not interfere with what adult agents contractually agree upon. In this paper I argue that the practical relevance of this critical insight depends on the availability of answers to three questions: Which are the core features (...)
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  3. How Social Democracy Worked: Labor-Market Institutions.Michael Wallerstein & Karl Ove Moene - 1995 - Politics and Society 23 (2):185-211.
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  4.  5
    Institutions, Policy and the Labour Market: The Contribution of the Old Institutional Economics.Ioannis A. Katselidis - 2019 - Economic Thought 8:13.
    This paper seeks to examine the relationship and the interaction between institutions, policy and the labour market in the light of the ideas of the first generation of institutional economists, who, in contrast to neoclassicals, conceived of the economy as a nexus of institutions, underlining, therefore, the significant role of institutional and non-market factors in the functioning of an economic system. They also criticised those who define welfare only in terms of efficiency and satisfaction of consumer (...)
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  5.  11
    Philosophy and the Labor Market in Romania.Sandu Frunza & Mihaela Frunza - 2010 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):28-58.
    One of the problems the institutional crisis of philosophy is facing in Romania is the difficulty of philosophy graduates to find a suitable place on the complex labor market. The article attempts to elucidate whether philosophy graduates subsequently teach what they study during their university education and to find solutions for a better integration on the labor market of these graduates. An important part of the article is dedicated to analyzing the institutional offer vis-à-vis the challenges (...)
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  6. Facing the Market: Institutions, Strategies, and the Fate of Organized Labor in Germany and Britain.Mitchell P. Smith - 1998 - Politics and Society 26 (1):35-67.
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  7.  2
    Labor Markets, Breadwinning, and Beliefs: How Economic Context Shapes Men's Gender Ideology.Sarah Thébaud & Youngjoo Cha - 2009 - Gender and Society 23 (2):215-243.
    Abundant research has found that men's economic status shapes their gender ideology such that men who are breadwinners are less likely to endorse egalitarian ideology than men in nontraditional arrangements. This article investigates how the association between men's breadwinning status and gender ideology is influenced by the institutional arrangements of different types of labor markets. Rigid labor markets support men's ability to be breadwinners in the long term, whereas flexible labor markets provide men with more frequent, but (...)
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  8.  11
    Conceptualizing Future Labour Markets.Steve Fleetwood - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (3):233-260.
    An enquiry into what future labour markets might look like is, necessarily, an enquiry into what future labour market institutions might look like. Any such enquiry requires a conceptual apparatus capable of dealing with labour markets and institutions. The conceptual apparatus of orthodox labour economics is incapable of this. An alternative conceptual apparatus, the ‘socio-economics of labour markets’, augmented with critical realist metatheory, is capable of dealing with future labour markets. This claim is demonstrated via the example (...)
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  9.  26
    Contextualizing Social Dilemmas in Institutional Practices : Negotiating Objects of Activity in Labour Market Organizations.Åsa Mäkitalo & Roger Säljö - 2009 - In Annalisa Sannino, Harry Daniels & Kris D. Gutierrez (eds.), Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 112--127.
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  10.  28
    The Future of the Labor Market.Claus Offe - 1984 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (60):81-96.
    In West Germany, there is a good deal of disagreement among leading political groups, economic decision makers and scientific experts concerning both the future of the labor market and the role of labor in society. This disagreement bears on all of the three relevant points: the prognosis of the likely future development, the policy most suited to this development, and the criteria and objectives that determine whether, in fact, a development could be judged as positive or indeed (...)
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  11. The Political Economy of Active Labor-Market Policy.Giuliano Bonoli - 2010 - Politics and Society 38 (4):435-457.
    Active labor-market policies have developed significantly over the past two decades across Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries, with substantial cross-national differences in terms of both extent and overall orientation. The objective of this article is to account for cross-national variation in this policy field. It starts by reviewing existing scholarship concerning political, institutional, and ideational determinants of ALMPs. It then argues that ALMP is too broad a category to be used without further specification, and it develops (...)
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  12. From “Sick Man” to “Miracle”: Explaining the Robustness of the German Labor Market During and After the Financial Crisis 2008-09.Kimberly J. Morgan & Alexander Reisenbichler - 2012 - Politics and Society 40 (4):549-579.
    What explains Germany’s exceptional labor market performance during the Great Recession of 2008-09? Contrary to accounts that emphasize employment protection legislation or government policy, this article argues that actions by firms—embedded in ever-changing coordinative institutional structures—were crucial. Firms chose to keep rather than shed labor, a strategy induced by a “toolkit” of flexible labor market instruments that had evolved incrementally over the past thirty years; wage restraint and successful internal restructuring of firms during the past (...)
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  13. What Do We Really Know About Racial Inequality? Labor Markets, Politics, and the Historical Basis of Black Economic Fortunes.Virginia Parks & William Sites - 2011 - Politics and Society 39 (1):40-73.
    Racial earnings inequalities in the United States diminished significantly over the three decades following World War II, but since then have not changed very much. Meanwhile, black—white disparities in employment have become increasingly pronounced. What accounts for this historical pattern? Sociologists often understand the evolution of racial wage and employment inequality as the consequence of economic restructuring, resulting in narratives about black economic fortunes that emphasize changing skill demands related to the rise and fall of the industrial economy. Reviewing a (...)
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  14. Barriers to Prisoners' Reentry Into the Labor Market and the Social Costs of Recidivism.David F. Weiman - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (2):575-611.
    Although the prison was originally conceived for the noble purpose of rehabilitating criminal offenders, critics from its very inception worried that the prison was an inherently criminogenic institution, reinforcing the criminal behaviors of its occupants. In this article I focus on an indirect mechanism, elaborating and empirically testing the impact of a prison record/experience on ex-inmates' labor market outcomes, by which ex-inmates will face significantly higher risks of recidivism and hence future prison spells, especially when they are released (...)
     
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  15. Increasing Earnings Inequality and Unemployment in Developed Countries: Markets, Institutions, and the “Unified Theory”.David R. Howell - 2002 - Politics and Society 30 (2):193-243.
    It is widely accepted that global forces of technology and trade have caused a profound shift in labor demand toward the most highly skilled, generating sharply rising earnings inequality in flexible labor markets and persistently high unemployment in rigid labor markets. This article critically assesses the evidence for this “Unified Theory.” It finds little compelling empirical support for either the skill-biased demand-shift explanation for high U.S. earnings inequality or the rigid labor markets explanation for high unemployment (...)
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  16. Is the Market a Sphere of Social Freedom?Timo Jütten - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (2):187-203.
    In this paper I examine Axel Honneth’s normative reconstruction of the market as a sphere of social freedom in his 2014 book, Freedom’s Right. Honneth’s position is complex: on the one hand, he acknowledges that modern capitalist societies do not realise social freedom; on the other hand, he insists that the promise of social freedom is implicit in the market sphere. In fact, the latter explains why modern subjects have seen capitalism as legitimate. I will reconstruct Honneth’s conception (...)
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  17. Institutions and Inequality in Liberalizing Markets: Explaining Different Trajectories of Institutional Change in Social Europe.Katja Sarmiento-Mirwaldt, Virginia Doellgast & Chiara Benassi - 2016 - Politics and Society 44 (1):117-142.
    This paper examines cross-national differences in the development of sectoral collective bargaining in the European telecommunications industry following comparable changes in market regulations. The authors seek to explain why centralized, coordinated bargaining institutions were established in Austria and Sweden, both within incumbent telecommunications firms and at the sector level, while Germany and Denmark experienced decentralization and disorganization of bargaining at both levels. The authors argue that these outcomes resulted from differences in institutional loopholes employers were able to exploit (...)
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  18.  9
    Markets as Mere Means.Rutger Claassen - 2017 - British Journal of Political Science 47 (2):263-281.
    There has been a remarkable shift in the relation between market and state responsibilities for public services like health care and education. While these services continue to be financed publicly, they are now often provided through the market. The main argument for this new institutional division of labor is economic: while (public) ends stay the same, (private) means are more efficient. Markets function as ‘mere means’ under the continued responsibility of the state. This paper investigates and rejects (...)
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  19. Trends of Palestinian Higher Educational Institutions in Gaza Strip as Learning Organizations.Samy S. Abu Naser, Mazen J. Al Shobaki, Youssef M. Abu Amuna & Amal A. Al Hila - 2017 - International Journal of Digital Publication Technology 1 (1):1-42.
    The research aims to identify the trends of Palestinian higher educational institutions in Gaza Strip as learning organizations from the perspective of senior management in the Palestinian universities in Gaza Strip. The researchers used descriptive analytical approach and used the questionnaire as a tool for information gathering. The questionnaires were distributed to senior management in the Palestinian universities. The study population reached (344) employees in senior management is dispersed over (3) Palestinian universities. A stratified random sample of (182) employees (...)
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  20.  11
    Global Justice, Labor Standards and Responsibility.Faina Milman-Sivan, Hanna Lerner & Yossi Dahan - 2011 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 12 (2):439-464.
    In this Article we propose an analytical framework for allocating responsibility for the protection of worker’s rights in the global labor market. Since production and services have expanded globally, and the state’s ability to protect worker’s rights on the national level has been undermined, the main challenge today is to find the appropriate institutional arrangements that allocate responsibility in a manner that realizes basic labor standards. The Article argues that in the context of a global labor (...)
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  21.  33
    De-Territorializing Labor Law.Guy Mundlak - 2009 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (2):189-222.
    Labor law was traditionally a domestic project, defined on the basis of a geographic territory or a synthetic community; its norms were determined by the state and applied to employers and workers who resided within the state. Commonly, labor law is administered on a territorial basis, applies to incoming workers, and stops at the borders in respect of other states' sovereignty when capital migrates. Globalization affects the background in which labor law operates, including the increased interdependence of (...)
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  22.  9
    The Role of Institutional Uncertainty for Social Sustainability of Companies and Supply Chains.Nikolas K. Kelling, Philipp C. Sauer, Stefan Gold & Stefan Seuring - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (4):813-833.
    Global sourcing largely occurs from so-called emerging markets and developing economies. In these contexts, substantial leverage effects for sustainability in supply chains can be expected by reducing adverse impacts on society and minimising related risks. For this ethical end, an adequate understanding of the respective sourcing contexts is fundamental. This case study of South Africa’s mining sector uses institutional theory and the notion of institutional uncertainty to empirically analyse the challenges associated with establishing social sustainability. The case study research is (...)
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  23.  1
    Doing the Dirty Work: Gender, Race, and Reproductive Labor in Historical Perspective.Mignon Duffy - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (3):313-336.
    The concept of reproductive labor is central to an analysis of gender inequality, including understanding the devaluation of cleaning, cooking, child care, and other “women's work” in the paid labor force. This article presents historical census data that detail transformations of paid reproductive labor during the twentieth century. Changes in the organization of cooking and cleaning tasks in the paid labor market have led to shifts in the demographics of workers engaged in these tasks. As (...)
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  24. From Peasants to Farmers: Peasant Differentiation, Labor Regimes, and Land-Rights Institutions in China’s Agrarian Transition.John A. Donaldson & Q. Forrest Zhang - 2010 - Politics and Society 38 (4):458-489.
    The development of factor markets has opened Chinese agriculture for the penetration of capitalism. This new round of rural transformation—China’s agrarian transition— raises the agrarian question in the Chinese context. This study investigates how capitalist forms and relations of production transform agricultural production and the peasantry class in rural China. The authors identify six forms of nonpeasant agricultural production, compare the labor regimes and direct producers’ socioeconomic statuses across these forms, and evaluate the role of China’s land-rights institution in (...)
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  25.  1
    Institutions and Institutional Purpose: Continuity and Change in East Asian Social Policy.Joseph Wong & Ito Peng - 2008 - Politics and Society 36 (1):61-88.
    Drawing on theories of institutional evolution, this article contends that despite the centrality of occupationally based social insurance in postwar Korea and Taiwan, the welfare state has in fact deepened considerably. The analysis is structured around three distinct eras of social policy reform in Korea and Taiwan: the developmental state, democratic transition, and postindustrialism. The authors contend that during each of these eras, the institutional purposes of social policy were altered to meet certain socioeconomic objectives. New institutional purposes were grafted (...)
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  26.  35
    Legislating a Woman’s Seat on the Board: Institutional Factors Driving Gender Quotas for Boards of Directors.Siri Terjesen, Ruth V. Aguilera & Ruth Lorenz - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):233-251.
    Ten countries have established quotas for female representation on publicly traded corporate and/or state-owned enterprise boards of directors, ranging from 33 to 50 %, with various sanctions. Fifteen other countries have introduced non-binding gender quotas in their corporate governance codes enforcing a “comply or explain” principle. Countless other countries’ leaders and policy groups are in the process of debating, developing, and approving legislation around gender quotas in boards. Taken together, gender quota legislation significantly impacts the composition of boards of directors (...)
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  27. Commandeering Crisis: Partisan Labor Repression in Spain Under the Guise of Economic Reform.Kenneth A. Dubin & John W. Cioffi - 2016 - Politics and Society 44 (3):423-453.
    The Eurozone crisis has triggered profound political and economic changes across the debtor member states. This article shows how the crisis and the imposition of austerity policies by the Troika have forced Spain to pursue internal devaluation as a means of economic adjustment through the reduction of real wages, increased pressure for liberalizing labor market institutions, and given Spain’s conservative government the opportunity and cover to pursue radical neoliberal labor law reforms. Spain’s 2012 labor law (...)
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  28.  1
    The Transformation of French Industrial Relations: Labor Representation and the State in a Post-Dirigiste Era.Chris Howell - 2009 - Politics and Society 37 (2):229-256.
    Despite continued social protest, something quite fundamental has changed in the regulation of class relations in France. This article explores two paradoxes of this transformation. First, a dense network of institutions of social dialogue and worker representation has become implanted in French firms at the same time as trade union strength has declined. Second, the transformation has involved a relaxation of centralized labor market regulation on the part of the state, yet the French state remains a central (...)
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  29. Republicanism and Markets.Robert S. Taylor - 2019 - In Yiftah Elazar & Geneviève Rousselière (eds.), Republicanism and the Future of Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 207-223.
    The republican tradition has long been ambivalent about markets and commercial society more generally: from the contrasting positions of Rousseau and Smith in the eighteenth century to recent neorepublican debates about capitalism, republicans have staked out diverse positions on fundamental issues of political economy. Rather than offering a systematic historical survey of these discussions, this chapter will instead focus on the leading neo-republican theory—that of Philip Pettit—and consider its implications for market society. As I will argue, Pettit’s theory is (...)
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  30. A Purposive Approach to Labour Law.Guy Davidov - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The mismatch between goals and means is a major cause of crisis in labour law. The regulations that we use - the legal instruments and techniques - are no longer in sync with the goals they are supposed to advance. This mismatch leads to a problem of coverage, where many workers who need the protection of labour law are not covered by it, as well as a problem of obsoleteness, as labour laws are not sufficiently updated in light of dramatic (...)
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  31.  5
    Institutional Logics in the Global Higher Education Landscape: Differences in Organizational Characteristics by Sector and Founding Era.Elizabeth Buckner & Mike Zapp - 2021 - Minerva 59 (1):27-51.
    This article examines patterns in the global higher education landscape associated with sector and founding era. Using data on the formal and academic structure of 15,133 higher education institutions from 183 countries and territories, we examine factors associated with the student body size, number of degree-granting programs, doctorate degrees, and curricular offerings. We find that only sector and age are associated with an institution’s student body size, while sector, age, and founding era are all associated with degree and curricular (...)
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  32.  3
    Between Morals and Markets? An Interdisciplinary Conceptual Framework for Studying Working Conditions at Catholic Social Service Providers in Belgium and Germany.Nadja Doerflinger, Dries Bosschaert, Adeline Otto, Tim Opgenhaffen & Lander Vermeerbergen - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (1):15-29.
    Despite sharing Catholic Social Teaching as their system of morals and both being confronted with marketisation pressures, working conditions at German and Belgian Catholic social service providers of elderly care differ. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach is needed to understand such differences, as interpretation of CST is mediated by local contexts. Working conditions result from interactions shaped by each country’s respective religious, legal and socio-economic contexts, providing players with different levels of discretion and power resources. In Belgium, working conditions (...)
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  33.  25
    Dual Labor Market.Andrzej Klimczuk & Magdalena Klimczuk-Kochańska - 2016 - In Nancy Naples, Renee Hoogland, Wickramasinghe C., Wong Maithree & Wai Ching Angela (eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1--3.
    The dual labor market theory is one of the primary explanations for the gender differences in earnings. It shows that gender inequality and stereotypes lead to employment of men and women in different segments of the labor market characterized by various incomes. This theory is based on the hypothesis that such markets are divided into segments, which are divided by different rules of conduct for workers and employers. Differences also include production conditions, terms of employment, productivity (...)
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  34.  40
    Not for Turning? Power, Institutional Ethos and the Ethics of Irreversibility.Rolland Munro - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (3):292-307.
    Adoption of an 'ethics of reversibility' can seem fashionably enlightened, even democratic, but appears less radical when issues of power are opened up. Adopting the motif of keeping , this paper sets its questioning of an on-going individuation of ethics within the context of an insidious reduction of institutional mores to business parlance. Keeping Derrida's 'philosophy of reversals' in view, the discussion resists the double bind of attempts to make higher-level decisions ever more 'irreversible' on the one hand, while devolving (...)
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  35.  3
    The Global Diffusion of Supply Chain Codes of Conduct: Market, Nonmarket, and Time-Dependent Effects.Thomas G. Altura, Anne T. Lawrence & Ronald M. Roman - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (4):909-942.
    Why and how have supply chain codes of conduct diffused among lead firms around the globe? Prior research has drawn on both institutional and stakeholder theories to explain the adoption of codes, but no study has modeled adoption as a temporally dynamic process of diffusion. We propose that the drivers of adoption shift over time, from exclusively nonmarket to eventually market-based mechanisms as well. In an analysis of an original data set of more than 1,800 firms between the years (...)
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  36.  29
    Responsible Property Investing in Canada: Factoring Both Environmental and Social Impacts in the Canadian Real Estate Market[REVIEW]Tessa Hebb, Ashley Hamilton & Heather Hachigian - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (S1):99 - 115.
    Institutional investors and corporations increasingly recognize that extra-financial determinants of business performance can both create value and uncover significant risks within a business or investment portfolio. For companies that invest in, develop, own, or operate commercial real estate assets, this awareness of extrafinancial impacts has led to a significant interest in what has been called "responsible property investment (RPI)". Within the field of RPI, green real estate — real estate investment and management that seeks to reduce the environmental impacts of (...)
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  37.  5
    Labour Market Inclusion of Young People with Mental Health Problems in Norway.Vegar Bjørnshagen & Elisabeth Ugreninov - 2021 - Alter- European Journal of Disability Research 15 (1):46-60.
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  38.  3
    Labor Market Gender Inequality in Minority Groups.Elizabeth M. Almquist - 1987 - Gender and Society 1 (4):400-414.
    Women's small share of professional and managerial occupations compared with their share of the total labor force is examined for the 11 largest racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Gender-related characteristics—women's labor force participation rates, marital status, and the sex ratio—influence women's share of the top jobs, as do class and ethnic variables such as place of birth, population size, and class of worker. Labor market gender inequality is greatest among the smaller, more affluent (...)
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  39.  8
    The Right Not to Have Rights: Posted Worker Acquiescence and the European Union Labor Rights Framework.Nathan Lillie - 2016 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 17 (1):39-62.
    The emergence of the European Union citizenship agenda has mainly taken place along the evolution of mobility rights, with the goal of creating a pan-European labor market. Mobility undermines the nationally embedded notion of industrial citizenship. Industrial citizenship protects workers’ rights and secures their participation in national political systems. The Europeanization of labor markets severs the relationship between state, territory and citizen on which industrial citizenship has been built, undermining worker collectivism and access to representation. This is (...)
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  40. Global Finance, Labor Politics, and the Political Economy of Housing Prices.Aidan Regan & Alison Johnston - 2017 - Politics and Society 45 (3):327-358.
    International political economy identifies declining nominal interest rates, securitization, and financial liberalization as drivers of rising housing prices. Despite witnessing these common credit shocks, however, developed economies experienced divergent trends in housing inflation since the 1980s. We offer a comparative political economy explanation of variation in house prices, arguing that by restraining household incomes, wage-setting institutions can blunt financial liberalization’s inflationary impact on housing markets. Employing quantitative analysis and a comparative study of Ireland and the Netherlands, we uncover two (...)
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  41.  20
    Marx and Rawls on the Justice of Capitalism and the Market.Ian Hunt, Yu Tan & Si-Liang Luo - 2007 - Modern Philosophy 1:15-26.
    Marx and Rawls seems to have a very different concept of justice. Marx argued that the concept of justice functions in the performance of the dominant ideological mode of production required for the conduct, as universally binding legal code. Rawls is argued that justice is the first virtue of social institutions, its law may be recognized by all such people: they are fair and reasonable to discuss the issue is how to equitably divide among themselves the burden of social (...)
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  42. Nomad Citizenship: Free-Market Communism and the Slow-Motion General Strike.Eugene W. Holland - 2011 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    _Nomad Citizenship_ argues for transforming our institutions and practices of citizenship and markets in order to release society from dependence on the state and capital. It changes Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of nomadology into a utopian project with immediate practical implications, developing ideas of a nonlinear Marxism and of the slow-motion general strike. Responding to the challenge of creating philosophical concepts with concrete applications, Eugene W. Holland looks outside the state to analyze contemporary political and economic development using the (...)
     
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  43.  1
    What Influences Participation in Non-Formal and Informal Modes of Continuous Vocational Education and Training? An Analysis of Individual and Institutional Influencing Factors.Julia Lischewski, Susan Seeber, Eveline Wuttke & Therese Rosemann - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Participation in further education is a central success factor for economic growth and societal as well as individual development. This is especially true today because in most industrialized countries, labor markets and work processes are changing rapidly. Data on further education, however, show that not everybody participates and that different social groups participate to different degrees. Activities in continuous vocational education and training are mainly differentiated as formal, non-formal and informal CVET, whereby further differences between offers of non-formal and (...)
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  44.  61
    Children’s Labor Market Involvement, Household Work, and Welfare: A Brazilian Case Study. [REVIEW]J. Lawrence French - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):63-78.
    The large numbers of children working in developing countries continue to provoke calls for an end to such employment. However, many reformers argue that efforts should focus on ending the exploitation of children rather than depriving them of all opportunities to work. This posture reflects recognition of the multiplicity of needs children have and the diversity of situations in which they work. Unfortunately, research typically neglects these complexities and fails to distinguish between types of labor market jobs, dismisses (...)
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  45.  1
    State-Building, Market Regulation and Citizenship in South Africa.Jeremy Seekings - 2016 - European Journal of Social Theory 19 (2):191-209.
    Public policy in post-apartheid South Africa has been characterized by a mix of state regulation and ‘neo-liberalism’. This article argues that this mix is rooted in the model of economic modernity adopted in South Africa in the 1920s and 1930s, and underpinned by the institutions of a modern state. In an economy transformed by mining and subsequent secondary industrialization, the state played a central role in facilitating capitalist growth, including through the regulation of labour. I argue that, contrary to (...)
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  46.  53
    Do No Harm: A Defense of Markets in Healthcare. [REVIEW]William Kline - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):241-251.
    This paper argues that the rules that constitute a market protect autonomy and increase welfare in healthcare. Markets do the former through protecting rights to self-ownership and a cluster of rights that protect its exercise. Markets protect welfare by organizing and protecting trades. In contrast, prohibition destroys legitimate markets, giving rise to so-called black markets that harm both the autonomy and well-being of agents. For example, a fee-for-service medical system is a highly developed and specialized market. It is (...)
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  47. Where Did Mill Go Wrong? Why the Capital-Managed Rather Than the Labor-Managed Enterprise is the Predominant.Schwartz Justin - 2012 - Ohio State Law Journal 73:220-85.
    In this Article, I propose a novel law and economics explanation of a deeply puzzling aspect of business organization in market economies. Why are virtually all firms organized as capital-managed and -owned (capitalist) enterprises rather than as labor-managed and -owned cooperatives? Over 150 years ago, J.S. Mill predicted that efficiency and other advantages would eventually make worker cooperatives predominant over capitalist firms. Mill was right about the advantages but wrong about the results. The standard explanation is that capitalist (...)
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  48.  10
    Children’s Labor Market Involvement, Household Work, and Welfare: A Brazilian Case Study.J. Lawrence French - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):63-78.
    The large numbers of children working in developing countries continue to provoke calls for an end to such employment. However, many reformers argue that efforts should focus on ending the exploitation of children rather than depriving them of all opportunities to work. This posture reflects recognition of the multiplicity of needs children have and the diversity of situations in which they work. Unfortunately, research typically neglects these complexities and fails to distinguish between types of labor market jobs, dismisses (...)
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    The Moral Foundations of Market Institutions.John Gray - 1992 - Integra: The Association for Integrative.
  50.  19
    Labour Market Policies in Transition Countries: An Austrian-Economic Assessment.Horst Feldmann - 2002 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 12 (4).
    In almost all countries, the transition from a centrally planned economy to a market economy caused high unemployment. The governments attempted to ease the changeover to a market economy for the unemployed by introducing several passive and active labour market policies. This paper first points out which effects were to be expected of such policies from the perspective of Austrian Economics. These theoretical hypotheses are then tested empirically. It turns out that the hypotheses deducted from Austrian Economics (...)
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