11 found
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  1.  46
    Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: I. A Comparative Investigation of 17 Interventions.Calvin K. Lai, Maddalena Marini, Steven A. Lehr, Carlo Cerruti, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, Arnold K. Ho, Bethany A. Teachman, Sean P. Wojcik, Spassena P. Koleva, Rebecca S. Frazier, Larisa Heiphetz, Eva E. Chen, Rhiannon N. Turner, Jonathan Haidt, Selin Kesebir, Carlee Beth Hawkins, Hillary S. Schaefer, Sandro Rubichi, Giuseppe Sartori, Christopher M. Dial, N. Sriram, Mahzarin R. Banaji & Brian A. Nosek - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (4):1765-1785.
  2. Does "Think" Mean the Same Thing as "Believe"? Insights Into Religious Cognition.Larisa Heiphetz, Casey Landers & Neil Van Leeuwen - forthcoming - Psychology of Religion and Spirituality.
    When someone says she believes that God exists, is she expressing the same kind of mental state as when she says she thinks that a lake bigger than Lake Michigan exists⎯i.e., does she refer to the same kind of cognitive attitude in both cases? Using evidence from linguistic corpora (Study 1) and behavioral experiments (Studies 2-4), the current work provides evidence that individuals typically use the word “believe” more in conjunction with statements about religious credences and “think” more in conjunction (...)
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  3.  14
    Can Only One Person Be Right? The Development of Objectivism and Social Preferences Regarding Widely Shared and Controversial Moral Beliefs.Larisa Heiphetz & Liane L. Young - 2017 - Cognition 167:78-90.
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  4.  40
    The Role of Moral Beliefs, Memories, and Preferences in Representations of Identity.Larisa Heiphetz, Nina Strohminger & Liane L. Young - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):744-767.
    People perceive that if their memories and moral beliefs changed, they would change. We investigated why individuals respond this way. In Study 1, participants judged that identity would change more after changes to memories and widely shared moral beliefs versus preferences and controversial moral beliefs. The extent to which participants judged that changes would affect their relationships predicted identity change and mediated the relationship between type of moral belief and perceived identity change. We discuss the role that social relationships play (...)
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  5.  23
    How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind.Larisa Heiphetz, Jonathan D. Lane, Adam Waytz & Liane L. Young - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):121-144.
    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit (...)
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  6.  22
    Who Am I? The Role of Moral Beliefs in Children's and Adults' Understanding of Identity.Larisa Heiphetz, Nina Strohminger, Susan Gelman & Liane L. Young - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology:210-219.
    Adults report that moral characteristics—particularly widely shared moral beliefs—are central to identity. This perception appears driven by the view that changes to widely shared moral beliefs would alter friendships and that this change in social relationships would, in turn, alter an individual's personal identity. Because reasoning about identity changes substantially during adolescence, the current work tested pre- and post-adolescents to reveal the role that such changes could play in moral cognition. Experiment 1 showed that 8- to 10-year-olds, like adults, judged (...)
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  7.  10
    Patterns of Implicit and Explicit Attitudes in Children and Adults: Tests in the Domain of Religion.Larisa Heiphetz, Elizabeth S. Spelke & Mahzarin R. Banaji - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (3):864-879.
  8.  6
    Examining Overlap in Behavioral and Neural Representations of Morals, Facts, and Preferences.Jordan Theriault, Adam Waytz, Larisa Heiphetz & Liane Young - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (11):1586-1605.
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  9.  13
    In the Name of God: How Children and Adults Judge Agents Who Act for Religious Versus Secular Reasons.Larisa Heiphetz, Elizabeth S. Spelke & Liane L. Young - 2015 - Cognition 144:134-149.
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  10.  5
    A Social Cognitive Developmental Perspective on Moral Judgment.Larisa Heiphetz & Liane Young - 2014 - Behaviour 151 (2-3).
    Moral judgment constitutes an important aspect of adults’ social interactions. How do adults’ moral judgments develop? We discuss work from cognitive and social psychology on adults’ moral judgment, and we review developmental research to illuminate its origins. Work in these fields shows that adults make nuanced moral judgments based on a number of factors, including harm aversion, and that the origins of such judgments lie early in development. We begin by reviewing evidence showing that distress signals can cue moral judgments (...)
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  11.  8
    Moral Essentialism and Generosity Among Children and Adults.Larisa Heiphetz - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (12):2077-2090.
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