15 found
Order:
See also
Larry M. Jorgensen
Skidmore College
  1. The Principle of Continuity and Leibniz's Theory of Consciousness.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 223-248.
    Leibniz viewed the principle of continuity, the principle that all natural changes are produced by degrees, as a useful heuristic for evaluating the truth of a theory. Since the Cartesian laws of motion entailed discontinuities in the natural order, Leibniz could safely reject it as a false theory. The principle of continuity has similar implications for analyses of Leibniz's theory of consciousness. I briefly survey the three main interpretations of Leibniz's theory of consciousness and argue that the standard account entails (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2. Leibniz on Memory and Consciousness.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (5):887-916.
    In this article, I develop a higher-order interpretation of Leibniz's theory of consciousness according to which memory is constitutive of consciousness. I offer an account of Leibniz's theory of memory on which his theory of consciousness may be based, and I then show that Leibniz could have developed a coherent higher-order account. However, it is not clear whether Leibniz held (or should have held) such an account of consciousness; I sketch an alternative that has at least as many advantages as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  52
    Seventeenth-Century Theories of Consciousness.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  4.  13
    Leibniz's Naturalized Philosophy of Mind.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This book is a systematic reappraisal of Leibniz’s philosophy of mind. The main argument of this book is easy to state: Leibniz offers a fully natural theory of mind. In today’s philosophical climate, in which much effort has been put into discovering a naturalized theory of mind, Leibniz’s efforts to reach a similar goal 300 years earlier will provide a critical stance from which we can assess our own theories. But while the goals might be similar, the content of Leibniz’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  26
    Leibniz on Perceptual Distinctness, Activity, and Sensation.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (1):49-77.
    Leibniz explains both activity and sensation in terms of the relative distinctness of perception. This paper argues that the systematic connection between activity and sensation is illuminated by Leibniz’s use of distinctness in analyzing each. Leibnizian sensation involves two levels of activity: on one level, the relative forcefulness of an expression enables certain expressions to stand out against the perceptual field, but in addition to this there is an activity of the mind that enables sensory experience. This connection of mental (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  32
    New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy.Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    In 1710 G. W. Leibniz published Theodicy: Essays on the Goodness of God, the Freedom of Man, and the Origin of Evil. This book, the only one he published in his lifetime, established his reputation more than anything else he wrote. The Theodicy brings together many different strands of Leibniz's own philosophical system, and we get a rare snapshot of how he intended these disparate aspects of his philosophy to come together into a single, overarching account of divine justice in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7. Mind the Gap: Reflection and Consciousness in Leibniz.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2011 - Studia Leibnitiana 43 (2):179-195.
  8.  65
    Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams.Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Throughout his philosophical career at Michigan, UCLA, Yale, and Oxford, Robert Merrihew Adams's wide-ranging contributions have deeply shaped the structure of debates in metaphysics, philosophy of religion, history of philosophy, and ethics. Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams provides, for the first time, a collection of original essays by leading philosophers dedicated to exploring many of the facets of Adams's thought, a philosophical outlook that combines Christian theism, neo-Platonism, moral realism, metaphysical idealism, and a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  52
    By Leaps and Bounds: Leibniz on Transcreation, Motion, and the Generation of Minds.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2013 - The Leibniz Review 23:73-98.
    This paper traces Leibniz’s use of his neologism, “transcreation.” Leibniz coins the term in his 1676 discussions of motion, using it to identify a certain type of leap that is essential to motion. But Leibniz quickly dispensed with this theory of motion, arguing instead that “nature never acts by leaps,” and the term “transcreation” fell out of use. However, Leibniz surprisingly revived the term in 1709 in his discussion of the generation of rational beings. By contrasting the way Leibniz uses (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Consciousness in Western Philosophy.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2018 - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Consciousness. pp. 24-37.
    In the pursuit of a naturalized philosophy of mind, consciousness receives concentrated attention, in part because the phenomena of consciousness seem recalcitrant, difficult to explain in the terms of the natural sciences. But this is not a new phenomenon—efforts to provide a naturalized theory of consciousness originate in Ancient Greek philosophy. This chapter defines the project of naturalism in a way that allows for a common project to be traced through the history of Western Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  19
    Forgiveness After Charleston: The Ethics of an Unlikely Act.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2017 - The Good Society 26 (2-3):338-353.
    In the wake of the Dylann Roof church shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina, forgiveness became a focus of the discussion. Within 48 hours of the shooting, several family members of the victims made personal offers of forgiveness to Dylann Roof. The flood of editorials and opinion pieces commenting on this offer of forgiveness revealed a deep division in public attitudes toward forgiveness, particularly in the context of racially motivated crimes. In this article, I explore the ethics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  29
    Michael V. Griffin: Leibniz, God and Necessity: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2013, 204 Pp, $90.00. [REVIEW]Larry M. Jorgensen - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):371-375.
  13.  41
    Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Larry M. Jorgensen - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):615-617.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Russell’s Leibnizian Concept of Vagueness.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2011 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):289-301.
    The account of vagueness Bertrand Russell provided in his 1923 paper, entitled simply “Vagueness” (see Russell [1923]1997), has been thought by some to be inconsistent. One main objection, raised by Timothy Williamson (1994), is that Russell’s attempt early in the paper to distinguish vagueness from generality is at odds with the definition of vagueness he presents later in the same paper. It is as if, as Williamson puts it, Russell “backslides” from his previous distinction (1994, 60), resulting in a conflation (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  6
    Introduction.Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen - 2009 - In Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.), Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams. Oxford University Press.
    Throughout his philosophical career at Michigan, UCLA, Yale, and Oxford, Robert Merrihew Adams's wide-ranging contributions have deeply shaped the structure of debates in metaphysics, philosophy of religion, history of philosophy, and ethics. Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams provides, for the first time, a collection of original essays by leading philosophers dedicated to exploring many of the facets of Adams's thought, a philosophical outlook that combines Christian theism, neo-Platonism, moral realism, metaphysical idealism, and a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark