Results for 'Larry Wear Colter'

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  1.  16
    The Commercialization of Human Body Parts: A Reappraisal From a Protestant Perspective.Larry Torcello & Stephen Wear - 2000 - Christian Bioethics 6 (2):153-169.
    The idea of a market in human organs has traditionally met with widespread and emphatic rejection from both secular and religious fronts alike. However, as numerous human beings continue to suffer an uncertain fate on transplant waiting lists, voices are beginning to emerge that are willing at least to explore the option of human organ sales. Anyone who argues for such an option must contend, however, with what seem to be largely emotional rejections of the idea. Often it seems that (...)
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  2. Health Humanities Reader.Therese Jones, Delese Wear & Lester D. Friedman (eds.) - 2014 - Rutgers University Press.
    Over the past forty years, the health humanities, previously called the medical humanities, has emerged as one of the most exciting fields for interdisciplinary scholarship, advancing humanistic inquiry into bioethics, human rights, health care, and the uses of technology. It has also helped inspire medical practitioners to engage in deeper reflection about the human elements of their practice. In _Health Humanities Reader_, editors Therese Jones, Delese Wear, and Lester D. Friedman have assembled fifty-four leading scholars, educators, artists, and clinicians (...)
     
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  3.  64
    Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW]Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno - 1994 - HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received in a lukewarm fashion by (...)
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  4. Medicine and Place: An Inquiry.Julie M. Aultman & Delese Wear - 2006 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (1):84-98.
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  5.  23
    The Professionalism Movement: Can We Pause?Delese Wear & Mark G. Kuczewski - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):1 – 10.
    The topic of developing professionalism dominated the content of many academic medicine publications and conference agendas during the past decade. Calls to address the development of professionalism among medical students and residents have come from professional societies, accrediting agencies, and a host of educators in the biomedical sciences. The language of the professionalism movement is now a given among those in academic medicine. We raise serious concerns about the professionalism discourse and how the specialized language of academic medicine disciplines has (...)
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  6.  52
    The Moral Significance of Institutional Integrity.Stephen Wear - 1991 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
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  7.  8
    Enhancing Clinician Provision of Informed Consent and Counseling: Some Pedagogical Strategies.Stephen Wear - 1999 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (1):34 – 42.
    Although long touted as an ethical and legal requirement, some clinicians still seem to offer less than fully adequate informed consent processes; similarly the counseling of patients and families, particularly about post-intervention scenarios, is often perfunctory at best. Keyed to a narrative of a patient's experience with surgery for a deviated septum, this article reflects on why such less than adequate clinician behaviors tend to occur and what might be done about them. Certain legal misconceptions about informed consent are highlighted (...)
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  8.  8
    Creating Difficulties Everywhere.Delese Wear & Julie M. Aultman - 2007 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):348-362.
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  9.  29
    Nuancing the Healer's Art — the Epistemology of Patient Competence.Stephen Wear - 1981 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):27-30.
    The programmatic thrust of Thomasma and Pellegrino [5] is clarified and underscored and is interpreted as an attempt to introduce a fixed point into the ethical dimension of medicine by specifying some regulative principles for the medical profession. Two important features of this type of enterprise are noted: on the one hand, it may lead the profession to distinguish between technically identical actions on the basis of the normative principles it produces, thus excluding some morally permissible actions as duties constitutive (...)
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  10.  23
    The Commercialization of Human Body Parts: A Reappraisal From a Protestant Perspective.Lawrence Torcello & Stephen Wear - 2000 - Christian Bioethics 6 (2):153-169.
    The idea of a market in human organs has traditionally met with widespread and emphatic rejection from both secular and religious fronts alike. However, as numerous human beings continue to suffer an uncertain fate on transplant waiting lists, voices are beginning to emerge that are willing at least to explore the option of human organ sales. Anyone who argues for such an option must contend, however, with what seem to be largely emotional rejections of the idea. Often it seems that (...)
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  11.  48
    Mental Illness and Moral Status.Stephen Wear - 1980 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (4):292-312.
  12.  16
    The Development of an Ethics Consultation Service.Stephen Wear, Paul Katz, Barbara Andrzejewski & Tirtadharyana Haryadi - 1990 - HEC Forum 2 (2):75-87.
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  13.  13
    The Relevance for Hecs of H.T. Engelhardt'sthe Foundations of Bioethics.Stephen E. Wear & Charles Jack - 1996 - HEC Forum 8 (1):2-11.
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  14.  24
    To Treat or Not to Treat: The Legal, Ethical and Therapeutic Implications of Treatment Refusal.A. N. Wear & D. Brahams - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (3):131-135.
    Health professionals faced with refusal of life-saving treatment may wish to override a person's wishes, especially if that person suffers from a mental disorder. Mental illness does not automatically mean a patient is incapable of making decisions of this nature. It is not always clear whether an individual is legally competent to decide whether to undergo treatment or not. This article discusses a clinical example and analyses some of the moral implications.
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  15.  18
    The One in Syrianus Teachings on the Parmenides: Syrianus on Parm., 137d and 139a1.S. Klitenic Wear - 2011 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (1):58-84.
    This article describes Syrianus' teachings on the One, as found in his testimonia on the Parmenides . In order to preserve the transcendence of the One, while still providing a fluid universe connected to the One, Syrianus shows how the nature of the One is seen in the structure of the Parmenides itself: the first hypothesis of the Parmenides outlines the primal God, while the intelligible universe is the subject of the second hypothesis, in so far as the intelligible universe (...)
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  16.  9
    The Irreducibly Clinical Character of Bioethics.Stephen Wear - 1991 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):53-70.
    Current bioethics scholarship and pedagogy suffers from an insufficient correlation with the realities and variables of clinical medicine, particularly in its dominant paradigm of patient autonomy. Reference to various basic clinical factors will be made here toward proposing certain conceptual, tactical and pedagogical modifications to this paradigm. Keywords: clinical reality, informed consent, paternalism, patient autonomy, physician beneficence CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  17.  9
    Teaching Bioethics at (or Near) the Bedside.Stephen Wear - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (4):433 – 445.
    Many teachers of bioethics often express concern, in their writings and otherwise, about the theoretical basis (or lack of it) of bioethics and the allied issue of relativism. The companion articles by Tong and Momeyer are in this vein and rightly address such issues within the context of a liberal arts education. This article addresses such issues in a different venue, i.e., bioethics teaching in the clinical sphere of health care institutions. It presumes to suggest that many of these theoretical (...)
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  18.  22
    Patient Autonomy, Paternalism, and the Conscientious Physician.Stephen Wear - 1983 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (3).
    This paper concerns itself with the concept of diminished competence with particular regard to the problems and options that mentally compromised patients raise for medical management. It proceeds through three general stages: (1) a restatement of the sense and grounds of the new patients' rights ethos which the existence of such patients calls into question; (2) a consideration of what expanded responsibilities and tactics physicians should embrace to protect and enhance such patients' autonomy; and (3) the standards, criteria, and mechanisms (...)
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  19.  8
    Literary Inquiry and Professional Development in Medicine: Against Abstractions.Delese Wear & Lois LaCivita Nixon - 2002 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (1):104-124.
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  20.  12
    Bless Me Reader for I Have Sinned: Physicians and Confessional Writing.Delese Wear & Therese Jones - 2010 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (2):215-230.
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  21.  5
    Culture Wars in New York State: Ongoing Political Resistance by Religious Groups to the Family Health Care Decisions Act.J. Freer & S. Wear - 2002 - Christian Bioethics 8 (1):9-24.
  22.  11
    State Aggression, Collective Liability, and Individual Mens Rea.M. A. Y. Larry - 2006 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):309–324.
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  23.  9
    Syrianus the Platonist on Eternity and Time.Sarah Klitenic Wear - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (2):648-.
  24.  9
    Review of Allan Silverman, The Dialectic of Essence: A Study of Plato's Metaphysics[REVIEW]Robert S. Colter - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (10).
  25.  8
    Continuing Education in Professional Psychology: Do Ethics Mandates Matter?Douglas M. Wear, Jennifer M. Taylor & Greg J. Neimeyer - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (2):165-172.
    Do continuing education (CE) mandates increase participation in ethics programs and enhance their perceived outcomes? In a study of 5,198 North American psychologists, significant differences were found between mandated and nonmandated psychologists in relation to their participation in ethics programs but not in the perceived outcomes associated with those trainings. Although 64.3% of those psychologists operating under ethics mandates reported completing at least one ethics training within the previous year, only 40.7% of those without such mandates reported doing likewise. Overall, (...)
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  26.  6
    "They Will Put It Together/and Take It Apart": Fiction and Informed Consent.Lois LaCivita Nixon & Delese Wear - 1991 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 19 (3-4):291-295.
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  27.  2
    Systematic Functionalism Revisited.R. A. Y. Larry - 1983 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 13 (2):231–242.
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  28.  6
    The Medical Humanities: Introduction.Therese Jones & Delese Wear - 2007 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):317-320.
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  29.  6
    Patenting Medical and Surgical Techniques: An Ethical-Legal Analysis.Stephen E. Wear, William H. Coles, Anthony H. Szczygiel, Adrianne McEvoy & Carl C. Pegels - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):75 – 97.
    Considerable controversy has recently arisen regarding the patenting of medical and surgical processes in the United States. One such patent, viz. for a "chevron" incision used in ophthalmologic surgery, has especially occasioned heated response including a major, condemnatory ethics policy statement from the American Medical Association as well as federal legislation denying patent protection for most uses of a patented medical or surgical procedure. This article identifies and discusses the major legal, ethical and public policy considerations offered by proponents and (...)
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  30.  4
    A Reply to Mr. Lange.L. W. Colter - 1971 - Mind 80 (317):122 - 123.
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  31.  1
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Andrew Wear - 1971 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):57-58.
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  32. Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Andrew Wear - 1980 - British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (4):376-377.
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  33.  17
    Professionalism in Medicine: Critical Perspectives.Delese Wear & Julie M. Aultman (eds.) - 2006 - Springer.
    The topic of professionalism has dominated the content of major academic medicine publications during the past decade and continues to do so. The message of this current wave of professionalism is that medical educators need to be more attentive to the moral sensibilities of trainees, to their interpersonal and affective dimensions, and to their social conscience, all to the end of skilled, humanistic physicians. Urgent calls to address professionalism from such groups as the Association of American Medical Colleges, the American (...)
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  34. An Interview With Larry A. Hickman.Larry A. Hickman - 2017 - Dewey Studies 1 (1):131-135.
    Larry A. Hickman is Emeritus Professor of philosophy at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, where he was the director of the Center for Dewey Studies from 1993 until his retirement in 2016. His monographs include: Modern Theories of Higher Level Predicates ; John Dewey's Pragmatic Technology ; Philosophical Tools for Technological Culture ; and Pragmatism as Post-Postmodernism. His edited volumes include Technology and Human Affairs ; Reading Dewey ; The Essential Dewey ; and The Correspondence of John Dewey. He has (...)
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  35.  15
    Sex Differences in Hadza Dental Wear Patterns.J. Colette Berbesque, Frank W. Marlowe, Ian Pawn, Peter Thompson, Guy Johnson & Audax Mabulla - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (3):270-282.
    Among hunter-gatherers, the sharing of male and female foods is often assumed to result in virtually the same diet for males and females. Although food sharing is widespread among the hunting and gathering Hadza of Tanzania, women were observed eating significantly more tubers than men. This study investigates the relationship between patterns of dental wear, diet, and extramasticatory use of teeth among the Hadza. Casts of the upper dentitions were made from molds taken from 126 adults and scored according (...)
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  36. Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan.Marcus Arvan - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (2):171-177.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions (...)
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  37.  15
    The Future's So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades.James J. Gross - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):212-216.
    In this article I consider the future of the field of emotion. My conclusion—borrowing the title of a little-remembered song from the 1980s—is that “the future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades.” I begin this article by considering some of the many daunting conceptual and empirical challenges here; this is clearly not a field for the faint of heart. I then turn to some of the incredible conceptual and empirical opportunities here; there are so many it’s easy to feel (...)
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  38.  77
    Comments on Larry May, Limiting Leviathan.Stewart Duncan - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (2):185-190.
    This paper discusses two aspects of Larry May's book Limiting Leviathan. First it discusses a passage in Leviathan, to which May draws attention, in which Hobbes connects obligation to "that, which in the disputations of scholars is called absurdity". Secondly it looks at the book's discussion of Hobbes and pacifist attitudes, with reference to Hobbes's contemporary critic John Eachard.
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  39.  67
    La théorie du développement moral défendue par Elliot Turiel et Larry P. Nucci peut-elle apporter un fondement empirique à l'éthique minimale ?Nathalie Maillard - 2013 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 8 (1):4-27.
    Les recherches menées dans le champ de la psychologie morale par Larry P. Nucci et Elliot Turiel conduisent à identifier le domaine moral avec le domaine des jugements prescriptifs concernant la manière dont nous devons nous comporter à l’égard des autres personnes. Ces travaux empiriques pourraient apporter du crédit aux propositions normatives du philosophe Ruwen Ogien qui défend une conception minimaliste de l’éthique. L’éthique minimale exclut en particulier le rapport à soi du domaine moral. À mon avis cependant, ces (...)
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  40.  12
    Remembering Larry.Carol Gilligan - 1998 - Journal of Moral Education 27 (2):125-140.
    Abstract I am honoured that you asked me to give the Kohlberg Memorial Lecture and grateful for this occasion to remember Larry and speak about his work. For me, it means coming back into a conversation that I was intensely involved in a long time ago. I have not talked publicly about Larry or my relationship with him since the time of his death, and it has now been over 10 years. I want to say how I remember (...)
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  41.  18
    ‘What to Wear?’: Clothing as an Example of Expression and Intentionality.Ian King - 2015 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 5 (1):59-78.
    I will argue here that for many of us the act of dressing our bodies is evidence of intentional expression before different audiences. It is important to appreciate that intentionality enables us to understand how and why we act the way we do. The novel contribution this paper makes to this examination is employing clothing as a means of revealing the characteristics of intentionality. In that, it is rare to identify one exemplar that successfully captures the relationships between the cognitive (...)
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  42.  15
    Symposium on Larry Temkin’s Rethinking the Good: Moral Ideals and the Nature of Practical Reasoning.Larry S. Temkin - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (4):363-392.
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  43.  24
    Jonathan Quong, Liberalism Without Perfection, Reviewed by Larry Krasnoff.Larry Krasnoff - 2012 - Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):752-760.
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  44.  9
    Rethinking Criminal Law: Critical Notice: Truth, Error, and Criminal Law: An Essay in Legal Epistemologyby Larry Laudan.Andrew Botterell - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 22 (1):93-112.
    Imagine the following. You have been asked to critically evaluate the criminal process in your home jurisdiction. In particular, you have been asked to determine whether the criminal process currently in place appropriately balances the need to maximize the chances of getting things right—of acquitting the innocent and convicting the guilty—with the need to minimize the chances of getting things wrong—of acquitting the guilty and convicting the innocent. How would you proceed? What rules of evidence and procedure would you put (...)
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  45.  31
    On a Homework Problem of Larry Horn's.Francis Jeffry Pelletier - unknown
    Larry Horn is justifiably famous for his work on the semantics of the English conjunction or and both its relationship to the formal logic truth functions ∨ and @ (“inclusive” and “exclusive” disjunction respectively1) and its relationship to the ways people employ or in natural discourse. These interests have been present since his 1972 dissertation, where he argued for a “scalar implicature-based” account of many of these relationships as opposed to a presuppositional account. They have surfaced in his “Greek (...)
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  46.  10
    Review of Truth, Error, and Criminal Law: An Essay in Legal Epistemology, by Larry Laudan. [REVIEW]Raphael M. Goldman & Alvin I. Goldman - 2009 - Legal Theory 15 (1):55.
    In 1966 the U.S. Supreme Court wrote, “The basic purpose of a trial is the determination of truth.” This is Larry Laudan's guiding premise in his “essay on legal epistemology.” Without ascertaining the facts about a crime, he writes, it is impossible to achieve justice, since a just resolution crucially depends on correctly figuring out who did what to whom. Thus, he continues, “it is entirely fitting to ask whether the procedures and rules that govern a trial are genuinely (...)
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  47.  1
    Introduction to Issues 2 and 3: Symposium on Consent in Sexual Relations: Larry Alexander.Larry Alexander - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (2):87-88.
    Legal and social norms regarding gender relations have undergone dramatic changes in the past 25 years. The changes have come about largely because of the confluence of changing economic and technological realities, the unfolding of the norm dictating equal treatment of individuals, the sexual revolution and its corollaries of improved contraception and legal abortion, the rise of women as a self-conscious group and a presence in the academy, and the interrelations of all of these factors. As men and women have (...)
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  48.  3
    The Blackboard and The Bottom Line: Why Schools Can't Be Businesses. Larry Cuban. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 2005. Pp. 253. $23.95. [REVIEW]Aaron Cooley - 2007 - Educational Studies 41 (3):268-276.
    (2007). The Blackboard and The Bottom Line: Why Schools Can't Be Businesses. Larry Cuban. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 2005. Pp. 253. $23.95. Educational Studies: Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. 268-276.
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  49. Wokół sporów we współczesnej filozofii nauki. Geneza stanowiska Larry 'ego Laudana'.Janusz Kraszewski - 1993 - Filozofia Nauki 4.
    The aim of the paper is to reconstruct the essential content and main sources of Larry Laudan's position in the philosophy of science. A background for the reconstruction is provided by the controversy about the nature of changes in science and by the controversy about so called „scientific realism”.
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  50. Aggregation Within Lives: Larry S. Temkin.Larry S. Temkin - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):1-29.
    Many philosophers have discussed problems of additive aggregation across lives. In this article, I suggest that anti-additive aggregationist principles sometimes apply within lives, as well as between lives, and hence that we should reject a widely accepted conception of individual self-interest. The article has eight sections. Section I is introductory. Section II offers a general account of aggregation. Section III presents two examples of problems of additive aggregation across lives: Derek Parfit's Repugnant Conclusion, and my Lollipops for Life Case Section (...)
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