Results for 'Laughter'

514 found
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  1.  20
    An Interview with Iohn Cottingham.Existential Laughter - 1996 - Cogito 10 (1):5-15.
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  2. Taking Laughter Seriously in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.Lydia L. Moland - 2018 - In All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. pp. 1-14.
    Philosophers in the nineteenth century took laughter and its related concepts very seriously. Most philosophers before this period treated laughter as tangential to philosophy’s core concerns, but beginning with Kant’s immediate successors, the family of concepts relating to the laughable—including comedy, wit, irony, and ridicule—took on new significance. They went from describing something derivative about humans to telling us what we, in the most basic sense, are. Well-known philosophers such as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche offered substantial treatments (...)
     
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  3. As If: Connecting Phenomenology, Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and Laughter.Chris A. Kramer - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (1):275-308.
    The discovery of mirror neurons in both primates and humans has led to an enormous amount of research and speculation as to how conscious beings are able to interact so effortlessly among one another. Mirror neurons might provide an embodied basis for passive synthesis and the eventual process of further communalization through empathy, as envisioned by Edmund Husserl. I consider the possibility of a phenomenological and scientific investigation of laughter as a point of connection that might in the future (...)
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  4. The Epistemic Function of Contempt and Laughter in Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - 2018 - In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Interpreters have noticed that Nietzsche, in addition to sometimes being uproariously funny, reflects more on laughter and having a sense of humor than almost any other philosopher. Several scholars have further noticed that Nietzschean laughter sometimes seems to have an epistemic function. In this chapter, I assume that Nietzsche is a pluralist about the functions of humor and laughter, and seek to establish the uses he finds for them. I offer an interpretation according to which he tactically (...)
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  5. The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor.John Morreall (ed.) - 1986 - State University of New York Press.
    This book assesses the adequacy of the traditional theories of laughter and humor, suggests revised theories, and explores such areas as the aesthetics and ethics of humor, and the relation of amusement to other mental states. Theories of laughter and humor originated in ancient times with the view that laughter is an expression of feelings of superiority over another person. This superiority theory was held by Plato, Aristotle, and Hobbes. Another aspect of laughter, noted by Aristotle (...)
     
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  6. Laughter in Nietzsche’s Thought: A Philosophical Tragicomedy.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (2):67-79.
  7.  85
    Studying Laughter in Combination with Two Humanoid Robots.Christian Becker-Asano, Takayuki Kanda, Carlos Ishi & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):291-300.
    To let humanoid robots behave socially adequate in a future society, we started to explore laughter as an important para-verbal signal known to influence relationships among humans rather easily. We investigated how the naturalness of various types of laughter in combination with different humanoid robots was judged, first, within a situational context that is suitable for laughter and, second, without describing the situational context. Given the variety of human laughter, do people prefer a certain style for (...)
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  8.  85
    "The Morality of Laughter" by F.H. Buckley. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - unknown
    Why is humour so hard to understand? Rather like attempts to explain how music can move us, attempts to explain why things are funny seem doomed from the outset. Discussions of humour typically distinguish three kinds of theory: the incongruity theory (we are amused by the incongruous), the relief theory (humour is an expression of relief in difficult situations) and the superiority theory (we laugh to express our sense of superiority over others). In the face of genuine humour, theories like (...)
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  9. Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences.Albrecht Classen (ed.) - 2010 - Walter de Gruyter.
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's (...) and gender politics in medieval conduct discourse -- Madelon Köhler-Busch. Pushing decorum: uneasy laughter in Heinrich von Dem Türlîn's Diu crône -- Connie L. Scarborough. Laughter and the comic in a religious text -- John Sewell. The son rebelled and so the father made man alone: ridicule and boundary maintenance in The Nizzahon vetus -- Birgit Wiedl. Laughing at the beast: the judensau: anti-Jewish propaganda and humor from the Middle Ages to the early modern period -- Fabian Alfie. Yes . . . but was it funny? Cecco Angiolieri, Rustico Filippi and Giovanni Boccaccio -- Nicolino Applauso. Curses and laughter in medieval Italian comic poetry -- Feargal Béarra. Tromdhámh guaire: a context for laughter and audience in early modern Ireland -- Jean E. Jost. Humorous transgression in the non-conformist fabliaux: a Bakhtinian analysis of three comic tales -- Gretchen Mieszkowski. Chaucerian comedy: Troilus and Criseyde -- Sarah Gordon. Laughing and eating in the fabliaux -- Christine Bousquet-Labouérie. Laughter and medieval stalls -- Scott L. Taylor. Esoteric humor and the incommensurability of laughter -- Jean N. Goodrich. The function of laughter in The second shepherds' play -- Albrecht Classen. Laughing in late-medieval verse and prose narratives -- Rosa Alvarez perez. The workings of desire: Panurge and the dogs -- Elizabeth Chesney Zegura. Laughing out loud in the Heptaméron: a reassessment of Marguerite de Navarre's ambivalent humor -- Lia B. Ross. You had to be there: the elusive humor of the Sottie -- Kyle Diroberto. Sacred parody in Robert Greene's Groatsworth of wit -- Martha Moffitt Peacock. The comedy of the shrew: theorizing humor in early modern Netherlandish art -- Jessica Tvordi. The comic personas of Milton's Prolusion VI: negotiating masculine identity through self-directed humor -- John Alexander. Ridentum dicere verum (using laughter to speak the truth): laughter and the language of the early modern clown "pickelhering" in German literature of the late seventeenth century (1675-1700) -- Thomas Willard. Andreae's ludibrium: Menippean satire in The chymische hochzeit -- Diane Rudall. The comic power of illusion-allusion -- Allison P. Coudert. Laughing at credulity and superstition in the long eighteenth century. (shrink)
     
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  10.  9
    All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.Lydia L. Moland (ed.) - 2018 - Springer.
    This book offers an analysis of humor, comedy, and laughter as philosophical topics in the 19th Century. It traces the introduction of humor as a new aesthetic category inspired by Laurence Sterne’s "Tristram Shandy" and shows Sterne’s deep influence on German aesthetic theorists of this period. Through differentiating humor from comedy, the book suggests important distinctions within the aesthetic philosophies of G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Solger, and Jean Paul Richter. The book links Kant’s underdeveloped incongruity theory of laughter to (...)
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  11.  35
    Life's Joke: Bergson, Comedy, and the Meaning of Laughter.Russell Ford - 2018 - In Lydia L. Moland (ed.), All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: pp. 175-193.
    The present essay argues that Bergson’s account of the comic can only be fully appreciated when read in conjunction with his later metaphysical exposition of the élan vital in Creative Evolution and then by the account of fabulation that Bergson only elaborates fully three decades later in The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. The more substantive account of the élan vital ultimately shows that, in Laughter, Bergson misses his own point: laughter does not simply serve as a (...)
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  12. Laughter an Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.Henri Bergson, Cloudesley Shovell Henry Brereton & Fred Rothwell - 1999
     
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  13. Going to Bed White and Waking Up Arab: On Xenophobia, Affect Theories of Laughter, and the Social Contagion of the Comic Stage.Cynthia Willett - 2014 - Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1):84-105.
    Like lynching and other mass hysterias, xenophobia exemplifies a contagious, collective wave of energy and hedonic quality that can point toward a troubling unpredictability at the core of political and social systems. While earlier studies of mass hysteria and popular discourse assume that cooler heads (aka rational individuals with their logic) could and should regain control over those emotions that are deemed irrational, and that boundaries are assumed healthy only when intact, affect studies pose individuals as nodes of biosocial networks (...)
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  14. Essays. On the Nature and Immutability of Truth in Opposition to Sophistry and Scepticism. On Poetry and Music, as the Affect the Mind. On Laughter, and Ludicrous Composition. On the Utility of Classical Learning. [REVIEW]James Beattie & William Creech - 1776 - Printed for William Creech.
     
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  15.  13
    Liberty, Laughter, and Tears.Horace Meyer Kallen - 1968 - De Kalb, Northern Illinois University Press.
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  16. Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi.Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.) - 2010 - Verlag Karl Alber.
     
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  17. Shocked but Connected: Notes on Laughter.Michael Roemer - 2012 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Surprised -- Freud -- Different and scary -- Disconnected -- Bergson and high comedy -- Blind and helpless but alive -- Childhood -- Making it real -- Annie Hall -- Free but connected.
     
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  18. Comic Laughter.Marie Taylor Swabey - 1961 - Archon Books.
     
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  19.  60
    Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism.Markus Gabriel - 2009 - Continuum.
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  20.  12
    Laughter as Immanent Life-Affirmation: Reconsidering the Educational Value of Laughter Through a Bakhtinian Lens.Joris Vlieghe - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-14.
    In this article I try to conceive a new approach towards laughter in the context of formal schooling. I focus on laughter in so far as it is a bodily response during which we are entirely delivered to uncontrollable, spasmodic reactions. To see the educational relevance of this particular kind of laughter, as well as to understand why laughter is often dealt with in a very negative way in pedagogical contexts, this phenomenon should be carefully distinguished (...)
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  21. Laughter and Literature: A Play Theory of Humor.Brian Boyd - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):1-22.
    : Humor seems uniquely human, but it has deep biological roots. Laughter, the best evidence suggests, derives from the ritualized breathing and open-mouth display common in animal play. Play evolved as training for the unexpected, in creatures putting themselves at risk of losing balance or dominance so that they learn to recover. Humor in turn involves play with the expectations we share-whether innate or acquired-in order to catch one another off guard in ways that simulate risk and stimulate recovery. (...)
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  22.  66
    Self- Deprecation and the Habit of Laughter.Camille Atkinson - 2015 - Florida Philosophical Review 15 (1):19-36.
    My objective here is to give an account of self-deprecating humor—examining what works, what doesn't, and why—and to reflect on the significance of the audience response. More specifically, I will be focusing not only on the purpose or intention behind self-deprecating jokes, but considering how their consequences might render them successful or unsuccessful. For example, under what circumstances does self-deprecation tend to put listeners at ease, and when is this type of humor more likely to put people off? I will (...)
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  23.  19
    Bataille and the Birth of the Subject: Out of the Laughter of the Socius.Nidesh Lawtoo - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (2):73-88.
    This article examines how Georges Bataille, one of the celebrated precursors of the postmodern death of a linguistic subject, is also a Nietzschean, pre-Freudian thinker who offers us an account of the birth of an affective subject. If critics still tend to recuperate Bataille within a “metaphysics of the subject,” the present article shows that the central concept of his thought needs to be reconsidered in the light of his debt to Pierre Janet’s “psychology of the socius,” an interpersonal psychology (...)
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  24.  41
    The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture.Stephen Halliwell - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):279-.
    The proposition that man is the only animal capable of laughter is at least as old as Aristotle . In a strictly physical sense, this is probably false; but it is undoubtedly true that as a psychologically expressive and socially potent means of communication, laughter is a distinctively human phenomenon. Any attempt to study sets of cultural attitudes towards laughter, or the particular types of personal conduct which these attitudes shape and influence, must certainly adopt a wider (...)
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  25.  4
    Divine Comedies: Post-Theology and Laughter in the Films of Bruno Dumont.Chelsea Birks & Lisa Coulthard - 2019 - Film-Philosophy 23 (3):247-263.
    The films of Bruno Dumont are tied to unwatchability, austerity, and a post-theological seriousness. Recently, however, Dumont has taken a surprising turn towards comedy; and yet these comedies are not without the post-theological despair that characterizes his earlier films. Taking Dumont's comedy seriously, this article frames Dumont's comedic turn not as a deviation but rather as a realignment that requires retroactive reconsideration of his oeuvre's post-theological orientation. We interrogate the philosophical implications of laughter in Dumont's work and argue that (...)
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  26. Ethical Consensus and the Truth of Laughter: The Structure of Moral Transformations.Hub Zwart - 1996 - Kok Pharos Pub. House.
    Then, all of a sudden, its vulnerability is revealed - and this is the experience of laughter. Moral criticism is preceded by laughter.
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  27.  20
    After the Laughter.Barbara S. Stengel - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-12.
    We humans laugh often and it is not always because something is funny. We laugh in the face of the pathetic or the powerless; sometimes we laugh at our own powerlessness or pathos.In short, we laugh at both the comical and the difficult. Here I am especially interested in the laughter that is sparked by what is difficult and how that laughter—and all laughter—breaks through to mark a range of emotional states: fear, nervousness, shame, confusion and others (...)
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  28.  29
    Civic Laughter: Aristotle and the Political Virtue of Humor.John Lombardini - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):0090591712470624.
    While the loss of the second book of the Poetics has deprived us of Aristotle’s most extensive account of laughter and comedy, his discussion of eutrapelia (wittiness) as a virtue in his ethical works and in the Rhetoric points toward the importance of humor for his ethical and political thought. This article offers a reconstruction of Aristotle’s account of wittiness and attempts to explain how the virtue of wittiness would animate the everyday interactions of ordinary citizens. Placing Aristotle’s account (...)
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  29.  51
    The Instinctual Basis of Human Affect: Affective Imaging of Laughter and Crying.J. Panksepp & N. Gordon - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):197-205.
    The goal of this study was to evaluate affective changes induced during mental imaging of instinctual action patterns. Subjects were first trained to simulate the bodily rhythms of laughter and crying and were then trained to image these processes without any movement. The mere imagination of the motor imagery of laughter and crying were sufficient to significantly facilitate happy and sad mood ratings as monitored by subjective self-report. In contrast, no changes in mood were reported while imaging the (...)
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  30.  12
    Laughter: Notes on a Passion.Anca Parvulescu - 2010 - MIT Press.
    Uncovering an archive of laughter, from the forbidden giggle to the explosive guffaw.
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  31.  68
    Distorting the Rule of Seriousness: Laughter, Death, and Friendship in the Zhuangzi.Albert Galvany - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):49-59.
    The main purpose of this article is to underline the crucial significance of laughter, a hitherto neglected matter in the study of the Zhuangzi. It aims to show that focusing on laughter is beneficial in order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of some of the most philosophically relevant problems in the Zhuangzi since a careful analysis of the role of laughter may reveal a great deal of debate concerning such issues as life, death, friendship, social relations, (...)
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  32. Fichte's Laughter.Slavoj Zizek - 2009 - In Markus Gabriel (ed.), Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. Continuum.
  33.  9
    The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture.Stephen Halliwell - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (2):279-296.
    The proposition that man is the only animal capable of laughter is at least as old as Aristotle. In a strictly physical sense, this is probably false; but it is undoubtedly true that as a psychologically expressive and socially potent means of communication, laughter is a distinctively human phenomenon. Any attempt to study sets of cultural attitudes towards laughter, or the particular types of personal conduct which these attitudes shape and influence, must certainly adopt a wider perspective (...)
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  34.  29
    Laughter, Freshness, and Titillation.Karl Pfeifer - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):307 – 322.
    Robert C. Roberts's suggestion that the conditions for laughter at humor (e.g. jokes) can best be captured with a notion of freshness, as opposed to surprise, is pursued. The relationship freshness has to setup and surprise is clarified, and the place of freshness within a larger system of structuring metaphors is alluded to. The question of whether freshness can also cover laughter at the nonhumorous (e.g. tickling) is then taken up, it being determined that such coverage is possible (...)
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  35.  32
    Greek Laughter: A Study of Cultural Psychology From Homer to Early Christianity.Charles Platter - 2010 - American Journal of Philology 131 (3):529-532.
    In 1991, Stephen Halliwell published "The Uses of Laughter in Greek Culture", an essay that, among other things, rejected totalizing definitions of laughter and the laughable in favor of a more nuanced view that emphasized a distinction between laughter perceived as friendly and non-consequential, i.e., not injurious to the reputation of anyone, and laughter seen as abusive, hostile, or belittling, and so deleterious to the reputation of the target. His point was not that laughter could (...)
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  36.  81
    Schopenhauer’s Laughter.Peter B. Lewis - 2005 - The Monist 88 (1):36-51.
    Schopenhauer is famous for his pessimism. Many people are surprised to learn that he articulated an important theory of laughter. While this theory has been scrutinised by aestheticians exploring the nature of humour, little has been written on the role of laughter in Schopenhauer’s pessimistic vision of the world. Admittedly, this latter topic is only a minor theme in Schopenhauer’s work: yet I contend that what he has to say illuminates the human predicament.
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  37. Reconciling Laughter: Hegel on Comedy and Humor.Lydia L. Moland - 2018 - In All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. pp. 15-32.
    Hegel’s philosophical system turns to a species of the laughable at three critical junctures of his dialectic: comedy appears both at the conclusion of classical art and of Hegel’s discussion of poetry, and romantic art ends with humor. But we misunderstand these transitional moments unless we recognize that Hegel did not use comedy and humor synonymously. Comedy refers to a dramatic genre with a 2000-year-old history; humor was a relatively recent aesthetic phenomenon that had become central to philosophizing about art (...)
     
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  38.  15
    Holocaust Laughter and Edgar Hilsenrath’s The Nazi and the Barber : Towards a Critical Pedagogy of Laughter and Humor in Holocaust Education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):301-313.
    This article tries to defend the position that Holocaust Education can be enriched by appreciating laughter and humor as critical and transformative forces that not only challenge dominant discourses about the Holocaust and its representational limits, but also reclaim humanity, ethics, and difference from new angles and juxtapositions. Edgar Hilsenrath’s novel The Nazi and the Barber is discussed here as an example of literature that departs from representations of Holocaust as celebration of resilience and survival, portraying a world in (...)
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  39.  17
    Infant Vocalizations: Contrasts Between Crying and Laughter.Robert R. Provine - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):471-472.
    Crying and laughter are innate, preverbal, species-typical vocalizations that have similarities and differences which are mutually illuminating.
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  40.  7
    “Making Reason Think More”: Laughter in Kant’s Aesthetic Philosophy.Patrick T. Giamario - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):161-176.
    This article explores the surprisingly decisive role that Kant’s “incongruity theory” of laughter plays in his aesthetic and broader critical philosophy. First, laughter constitutes a highly specific form of aesthetic judgment in Kant. Laughter involves a discordant relation between the cognitive faculties characteristic of the sublime, but this relation obtains between the understanding and the imagination, the two faculties at play in judgments of taste on the beautiful. Second, laughter is the transcendental condition of possibility for (...)
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  41.  22
    Laughter and Game in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.Martin Stevens - 1972 - Speculum 47 (1):65-78.
    Even the casual reader cannot help noticing the holiday atmosphere, the joyous tone, and the laughter that prevails in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight from beginning to end. Yet, despite this festive spirit, critics have all too often examined the poem's high seriousness and focused on its darker, more brooding details while allowing the bright and playful setting to recede to the blurry edges of their vision. Repeatedly in the critical literature, we are reminded of Gawain's heavy sin, (...)
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  42. Irony, Ambiguity, and Laughter in Greek and Latin Texts.Haijo Jan Westra - 2010 - In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
     
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  43.  41
    The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor.Joseph Carpino - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):405-406.
    This anthology is a result of the editor's courses in the philosophy of laughter and humor. The book is divided into two sections, roughly equal in length. The first presents the "Traditional Theories of Laughter and Humor," in chronological order from Plato to Bergson. The second section consists of contemporary treatments and is further divided into "Contemporary Theories of Laughter and Humor", "Amusement and Other Mental States", and a final problem, "The Ethics of Laughter and Humor".
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  44.  21
    The Conception of Laughter in the XVIth Century.Vera Cecília Machline - 1999 - Trans/Form/Ação 21 (1):11-19.
    In this article it is maintained that laughter has raised, at least in the Western World, since biblical times, both caution in social interaction and prestige as a therapeutical tool. In the XVIth century, in particular, the search for the nature of the laughable was promoted side by side with the recommendation that people should laugh in moderation out of urbanity and for physiological reasons.Este artigo considera que o riso desperta, pelo menos no mundo ocidental, um misto de cautela (...)
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  45.  14
    Nietzsche’s Joy: On Laughter’s Truth.Jason M. Wirth - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):117-139.
    This essay is devoted to an examination of the relationship between truth and laughter in the works of Nietzsche. My central text shall be the much malignedbook four of Zarathustra, with special attention paid to the braying of the ass. Laughter has been traditionally considered irrelevent to serious philosophical content and, at best, a stylistic quirk. I argue that this stems from a basic predjudice that is constitutive of a large part of the Western tradition, namely, the confusion (...)
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  46.  9
    Taking Laughter Seriously in Augustine’s Confessions.Justin Shaun Coyle - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (1):65-86.
    This essay analyzes the subtle theology of laughter that is scattered across Augustine’s Confessiones. First, I draw on Sarah Byers’s work in order to argue that Augustine adopts and adapts Stoic moral psychology as a means of sorting the laugh into two moral kinds—as evidence of either good joy or bad joy. In turn, these two kinds provide the loose structure for the double theological taxonomy of merciless and merciful laughter that conf. develops. Next, I treat laughter (...)
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  47.  24
    Tails of Laughter: A Pilot Study Examining the Relationship Between Companion Animal Guardianship (Pet Ownership) and Laughter.Robin Maria Valeri - 2006 - Society and Animals 14 (3):275.
    A pilot study examined the relationship in daily life between companion animal guardianship and peoples' laughter. The study divided participants into 4 mutually exclusive groups: dog owners, cat owners, people who owned both dogs and cats, and people who owned neither. For one day, participants recorded in "laughter" logs the frequency and source of their laughter and the presence of others when laughing. Dog owners and people who owned both dogs and cats reported laughing more frequently than (...)
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  48.  18
    Laughter and the Death of the Comic: Charlie Chaplin's The Circus and Limelight in Light of the Ethics of Emmanuel Levinas.Moshe Shai Rachmuth - 2015 - Film-Philosophy 19 (1):15-32.
    Using the work of Emmanuel Levinas, this article sheds light on Charlie Chaplin's The Circus, a piece that so far eluded the critics, despite its immense popularity with theater viewers. I show that it is not Chaplin's lack of inventiveness that makes the Tramp risk his life on the tightrope 'for nothing'. It is, on the contrary, Chaplin's intuitive sense that makes him believe, anticipating Levinas, that it is human and simple for a person to help another for no benefit. (...)
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  49.  14
    Comic Laughter[REVIEW]D. C. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):310-310.
    Explaining and classifying attitudes and art forms related to comic laughter, Swabey defends the kind of comic laughter which perceives the laughable as less than the perfect and true. Bad or false pretenders to "comedy" or humor, e.g., apparently all modern art reputed to be comic and playful, are rather bitterly scolded. The thesis might have been more credibly argued if more positive examples had been used.--C. D.
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  50.  10
    Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter.Michael Naas - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation (...)
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