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  1. Are Local Food and the Local Food Movement Taking Us Where We Want to Go? Or Are We Hitching Our Wagons to the Wrong Stars?Laura B. DeLind - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):273-283.
    Much is being made of local food. It is at once a social movement, a diet, and an economic strategy—a popular solution—to a global food system in great distress. Yet, despite its popularity or perhaps because of it, local food (especially in the US) is also something of a chimera if not a tool of the status quo. This paper reflects on and contrasts aspects of current local food rhetoric with Dalhberg’s notion of a regenerative food system. It identifies three (...)
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  2.  39
    Safe at Any Scale? Food Scares, Food Regulation, and Scaled Alternatives.Laura B. DeLind & Philip H. Howard - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):301-317.
    The 2006 outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, traced to bagged spinach from California, illustrates a number of contradictions. The solutions sought by many politicians and popular food analysts have been to create a centralized federal agency and a uniform set of production standards modeled after those of the animal industry. Such an approach would disproportionately harm smaller-scale producers, whose operations were not responsible for the epidemic, as well as reduce the agroecological diversity that is essential for maintaining healthy human beings (...)
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  3.  37
    Place, Work, and Civic Agriculture: Common Fields for Cultivation. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (3):217-224.
    ``Civic agriculture'' identifies adiverse and growing body of food and farmingenterprises fitted to the needs of localgrowers, consumers, rural economies, andcommunities. The term lends shape andlegitimacy to development paradigms that existin opposition to the global,corporately-dominated food system. Civicagriculture also widens the scope of ag-relatedconcerns, moving away from a strictlymechanistic focus on production and capitalefficiency, and toward the more holisticreintegration of people in place. To date,researchers and practitioners have attendedclosely to the economic benefits of newmarketing arrangements and institutions (e.g.,value-added co-ops, CSAs, (...)
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  4.  97
    Of Bodies, Place, and Culture: Re-Situating Local Food. [REVIEW]Laura B. Delind - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):121-146.
    In the US, an increasingly popular local food movement is propelled along by structural arguments that highlight the inequity and unsustainablity of the current agri-food system and by individually based arguments that highlight personal health and well-being. Despite clear differences in their foci, the deeper values contained in each argument tend to be neglected or lost, while local innovations assume instrumental and largely market-based forms. By narrowing their focus to the rational and the economic, movement activists tend to overlook (or (...)
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  5.  64
    Place and Civic Culture: Re-Thinking the Context for Local Agriculture. [REVIEW]Laura B. Delind & Jim Bingen* - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (2):127-151.
    This article considers the qualitative concept of place – what it means, how it feels, how it is expressed, and how it is managed across time and space as the appropriate context within which to study and promote local agriculture and the locus of relationships, both cultural and political, that prefigure a local civic culture. It argues that civic as a description of local food and farming is conceptually and practically shallow in the absence of our ability to understand and (...)
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  6.  5
    Close Encounters with a CSA: The Reflections of a Bruised and Somewhat Wiser Anthropologist.Laura B. DeLind - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):3-9.
    This essay tells a story. It is a story of the author's experience with community supported agriculture. It is also a story that depicts the difficulties of academic activism and grass-roots engagement. As an academic and an activist, the author argues that it is important to admit and share experiences that are “less than perfect,” since they are the basis for a more complete knowledge and a more organic existence, individually, collectively, sensually, and intellectually.
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  7.  55
    The State, Hog Hotels, and the "Right to Farm": A Curious Relationship. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1995 - Agriculture and Human Values 12 (3):34-44.
    A grassroots protest against a large-scale confinement swine facility in Jackson Country, Michigan resulted in an out-of-court settlement that redressed the concerns of local residents. At the same time, the protest was instrumental in modifying state-level legislation to secure greater legal protection for intensive animal agriculture. The paper traces this ironic turn of events. Original efforts to regulate industrial agriculture were publicly reinterpreted by agribusiness as an assault on the "right to farm" of all farmers, regardless of scale and organizational (...)
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  8.  23
    Sustainable Agriculture in Michigan: Some Missing Dimensions. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (4):38-45.
    Michigan's approach to sustainability does not conflict with its efforts to reindustrialize state agriculture. As currently applied, agricultural sustainability remains a one-dimensional concept tightly focused on the condition of production resources and the larger physical environment. The social and political dimensions of sustainability, by contrast, are conspicuously absent. Using Michigan's ‘livestock initiative’ as a case in point, it is argued that this conceptualization conforms to and reinforces the reindustrialization of agriculture and the existing structure of power within the industry.
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  9.  13
    Celebrating Hunger in Michigan: A Critique of an Emergency Food Program and an Alternative for the Future. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (4):58-68.
    Michigan Harvest Gathering is a popular and nationally acclaimed antihunger campaign. It represents a state-sponsored partnership among public, private, and nonprofit institutions “to improve conditions for Michigan's citizens in need". This paper reviews the program, and in the process, critically examines its underlying assumptions about the nature of hunger and helping, about those who are hungry, and about the relationship of agriculture to the remediation of hunger throughout the state. It argues that, in keeping with Michigan's corporatist orientation, the program (...)
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  10.  11
    The U.S. Farm Crisis: Program Responses and Alternatives to Them—the Case of Michigan. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1986 - Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):59-65.
    The current crisis in U.S. agriculture has broadcast a rather simplex message. It is that the traditional family farm is in serious trouble. This message is apparent in the agricultural programs that have emerged in direct response to the farm crisis. Using Michigan's experience as illustration, these programs are shown to share similar objectives supported by a singular policy orientation. They utilize a ‘farm as firm’ model and treat the small farm operation as the unit of problem analysis and remedial (...)
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  11.  10
    For Whose Benefit?: A Second Look at Fund Raisers and Other Charitable Responses to the U.S. Farm Crisis. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1987 - Agriculture and Human Values 4 (2-3):4-10.
    The deepening U.S. farm crisis has been accompanied by numerous benefit fund raisers, individual donations and volunteer programs—all an expression of cooperation and concern on the part of U.S. citizens, farmer and non-farmer alike. These responses have received wide media attention and much public praise. A sense of patriotism and self-reliance underlies their popularity. Nevertheless, such efforts work to undermine their own ultimate objective—that of improving the economic circumstances of the family farm and farm family.This irony, it is argued, arises (...)
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  12.  17
    Index – Volume 23 – 2006.Laura B. deLind - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):535-539.
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  13. Manuscript Submission.Laura B. DeLind - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22:119-122.
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